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Full text of "Vocational-agriculture aids"

. ; • 







L I B RAR.Y 

OF THE. 

U N 1VERSITY 

OF 1LLI NOIS 



630.VoC5 
ILL 
V. 23-24 
cop . 2 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 



http://www.archive.org/details/vocationalagricu2324univ 



JILL 



VO-AG AIDS 



Volume 23, Number 1 

August 1964 )V 23 I 



Issued jointly by 
Vocational Agriculture Service, College of Agriculture 

and 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

in Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 



XL-L 

v. A5~ £f 



co\ 



VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 



Agricultural Releases, Advance Orders for Slidefilms and Units. To date (July 21) we have 
received orders for Agricultural Releases, etc. , from 310 Illinois schools. In the September 
AIDS we will list the schools that have ordered by that time. Please keep in mind the October 
1 deadline. If you need an order blank, please let us know. 

JWM 

Changes in our Addressograph Plates. We have attempted to bring our addressograph list 
up to date according to information we have received about teacher changes, etc. Please 
check the address on your copy of this issue of the AIDS and notify us if there are errors in 
the spelling of your name or in the address so that we can correct our plates if necessary. 

JWM 

Extramural Graduate Courses in Agriculture. We have received the following information 
from Dean Karl E. Gardner about proposed extramural course offerings from the College of 
Agriculture for the first semester, 1964-65: 



Ag. Ec. E302 Financing Agriculture Holcomb 



Ag. Ec. E332 Livestock Marketing 



Agron. E303 Soil Fertility 



Plant Path. ES06 Plant Diseases 



Broadbent Moline 



Ag. Eng. E331 Farm Machinery 

Ag. Eng. E381 Farm Electrical Eqpt. Olver 



Butler & 
Hunt 



Kurtz 



Britton 



Ag. Ec. E302 Financing Agriculture Smith 



Macomb Western 111. Univ. 

Room 102, classroom bldg. 
Sept. 21, 6:30 p.m. 

Senior High School 

Room B157 

Sept. 24, 6:30 p.m. 

Henry High School, Vo-Ag Shop 

3ef*tfl9, 9;00a.m. 

Beileviite Beilwille Jr (Allege 

Room 102, Sept. 23, 6 :30p.m. 

LaSalle LaSalle-Peru High School 

Room 213 
Sept. 24, 6:30 p.m. 

Peoria Glen Oak Pavilion, Glen 

Oak Park, Sept. 24 
7:00 p.m. 

Springfield High School, Room 110 

Spt.24, 7:00 p.m. 



AIDS, August 1964 



-1- 



KEG/JWM 



bounty Ag. and Home Ec. Scholarships. We are indebted to Dean Karl E. Gardner for the 
blloWing : 

County Ag. and Home Ec. Scholarships. Two recent changes have taken 
place in the awarding of the county agriculture and county home economics 
scholarships to the University of Illinois. These changes, and perhaps 
others, have resulted in a 40 percent drop in the number of awards made in 
1964 as compared to 1963 in both agriculture and home economics. The total 
awards in 1964 are 50 county scholarships in agriculture and 27 in home 
economics. The causes may be as follows: 

1. The date for the examination was changed from the month 
of March back to November and February. For the 1964-65 
school year, high school seniors who plan to take the 
examination for one of these scholarships must make applica- 
tion by October, 1964 and take the examination in November 
(the tentative date is Saturday November 7, 1964) in order 
to be elibible for county tuition scholarship consideration. 

2. The relative grade required to pass the test may be 

somewhat higher than in the past. This year the student 
must have earned an ACT (American College Testing) 
composite score of 24 or higher. 

KEG/ J 

Admission Problems - College of Agriculture. The following information is from the 
Dffice of Dean Karl E. Gardner: 

Admission Problems . All colleges and universities in the United States are going to 
have increasing difficulty in accepting not only all the students who wish to attend, but even 
all the students who should be able to complete collegiate work satisfactorily. Nationally, 
there will be 30 percent more students graduating from high school in 1965 than in 1963 — 
just two years later. The Illinois increase is somewhat smaller than the national average. 

Obviously, the colleges and universities of the country cannot handle a 30 percent 
Increase in the number of applicants. This means that admissions standards are being 
elevated everywhere. . Some would-be college students in your area may receive "sorry" 
letters . 

A few students who wish to attend the College of Agriculture at the University wifl not 
be accepted for September, 1964 either because of their low high school rank or test scores, 
or the lateness of their applications. If they rank in the upper 50 percent of their high school 
class, they may wish to consider applying for the second semester, February 1965 since there 
will be some vacancies then as usual. 

The University of Illinois is scheduling a considerable increase in the number of new 
freshmen at Urbana for 1964 over 1963, but not as great as the 16 percent increase in the 
number of high school graduates this year. Coupled with this statistic is the fact that a higher 
percentage of students are attempting to enter colleges each year. 

The importance of a good high school scholastic record cannot be overemphasized. 
High School rank is still by far the best predictor of college success that we have available. 

In spite of the best selection indices, some 30 percent of entering freshmen at the 
University (and at other schools, too) do not return for the sophomore year for a variety of 
reasons. College students need indications of interest, support, and concern not only from 
their teachers and parents but from the home community. Encouragement at the strategic 
moment can often prevent a "college drop-out." 

ATT^C A * lOCA 9 KEG/JWM 

AIDS, August 1964 -*- 



FFA Roadside Signs . The Illinois Foundation FFA Board of Trustees in their July meeting 
authorized funds to considerably increase the number of sets that can be reconditioned during 
the coming year. This program has lagged behind the demand for the past severl years so 
we presently have a waiting list of schools, as follows: 



Atkinson 
Bismarck 
Blue Mound 
Bradford 
Bunker Hill 
Chris man 
Elizabeth 
Little York 
Manlius 



Mulberry Grove 

Oblong 

Palmyra 

Pekin 

Streator (Woodland) 

Ullin 

Williamsfield 

William sville 

Yates City 



If you would like to have your signs reconditioned, send us your request before November 1. 
A tear sheet is included for this purpose in this issue of the AIDS and will also be included in 
the September and October issues. Schools listed above need not reply unless there has been 
a change in plans. 

JWM 



VAS Order Files . A manilla folder containing order forms and envelopes will be delivered to 
each Illinois teacher at the fall section meetings. This was approved by the Vo-Ag Service 
Advisory Board at their June meeting as a means for making it more convenient for teachers 
to order materials throughout the year. We will make every effort to help you keep this file 
up to date. It is our thought that this will supplement, but not substitute for your listing card 
file which will continue to give you detailed information about each of the available items. We 
will also send one of these order files without charge to any out-of-state teacher who requests it. 

JWM 

Surveying Kits . Surveying kits will be delivered to the even-numbered sections at the time 
of their fall section meetings. In addition, kits will be available to Sections 1, 21, and 17. 
This was determined on the basis of interest indicated on the reports from the sectional 
meetings held in June. We expect to have at least one additional kit before spring, 1965, which 
can be placed in another of the odd -numbered sections. 

JWM 

Summary of Public Information Survey . Incluued in this issue of the AIDS going to Illinois 
schools is a summary of the results of the public information survey that was conducted by 
Dave Beckenholdt last spring. We have a few -additional copies for anyone that is interested. 

JWM 

Dairy Holders' Contest. Fourteen boys participated in the Dairy Holders' Contest at the time 
of the Dairy Judging Contest. They were: 



Ted Poehler - Oblong 
Lynn Ash - Gilman 
Dan Crafton - Taylor Ridge 
Craig Johnson - Huntley 
Tommy Moore - Fairbury 
Bill Plahm - Manteno 
Jack Reiser - Ashland 



Joe Newbold - Oblong 
Jamie Mueller - Sherrard 
Paul Pyatt - Pinckneyville 
Sidney Sherwin - Huntley 
Dale Smith - Greenville 
Bob Freiders - Sandwich 
Billy Hartshorn - Rock Falls 



The Winners were: 



AIDS, August 1964 



Tommy Moore - Fairbury (First) 

Lynn Ash - Gilman (Second 

Paul Pyatt - Pinckneyville (Third) 

-3- 



WHW 



Survey of Economics of Agriculture. The following was received from Professor H.J. 
Schweitzer: 

I want to express my appreciation to the many vocational agriculture teachers who 
responded to the recent survey made of Economics for Agriculture . It is encouraging to note 
that most of the teachers are reading and keeping the new issues and are then using them as 
references either frequently or occasionally. 

Many suggestions were received as to subject matter desix'ed in future issues. These 
suggestions, along with others, have been passed on to the staff in the Department of Agricultural 
Economics who contributed to this reference service. Additional comments and suggestions 
about Economics for Agriculture are always welcome. 

HJS/JHH 

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 

Once each year it has been customary to review some of the important policies and procedures 
of Vocational Agriculture Service, particularly for new teachers. 

Open Accounts. An open account is maintained for each school in Illinois with a 
vocational agriculture department. We do the same for out-of-state schools that sign up 
for Agricultural Releases. The following apply to open accounts; 

1. Orders totalling less than $10.00 are placed on open account unless 
immediate billing is requested. Statements are normally sent with orders that 
exceed $10.00. 

2. Whenever open account charges reach $10.00, a statement will be sent. 

3. A statement for Agricultural Releases and advance orders for slidefilms will be 
sent near the end of the school year. Accumulated open account charges pending 
at that time will also be included. 

4. Schools whose orders total less than $10.00 for the year will be billed for whatever 
amount is due near the end of the school year. 

Payment of Accounts. Unless otherwise directed, statements will be sent to the vocational 
agriculture instructor. We shall appreciate your submitting these statements piT>mptly to 
the proper authority for payment. Checks should be made payable to the University of Illinois 
but sent to Vocational Agriculture Service , 434 Mumford Hall, Urbana, Please notify 
us promptly if you find an error or have any question about your account. 

Shipment of Orders. Most of our shipments are made by United Parcel Service as they 
will pick up at our building and deliver to your school. If you prefer that shipment be made 
by other carrier, please indicate this on your order. 



AIDS, August 1964 " 5 " 



Participation of Agriculture College Staff Members on Off -Campus Meetings. Following 
are the main points in the long-time policy regarding securing speakers from the College 
:>f Agriculture for adult class meetings: 

1. In order to avoid conflicts and duplication within the county. 
vocational agriculture teachers should confer with local farm 
adviser before making requests for services of staff members. 
Teachers may then send their requests either to Vocational 
Agriculture Service or direct to the individual or department 
concerned. 

2. It is understood that normally only one speaker will attend any 
series of adult class meetings. 

3. As a general policy, no charge will be made for travel of a 
speaker unless the meeting requires a special trip that, in the 
opinion of the head of the department, would justify such a charge. 

4. A request for a speaker should be made as far as possible in 
advance of the meeting. It is advisable to give alternate dates 
also. 

lequests for Bulletins and Circulars from the College of Agriculture . We have tried 
tver the years to maintain the good relationship that exists between vocational agriculture 
lepartments and the College of Agriculture regarding free distribution of bulletins and 
:irculars for class use. Continuation of this good relationship depends on your cooperat 
n observing the following policies: 

1. Send requests to Vocational Agriculture Service for library copies 

of all Illinois bulletins and circulars needed in your program. Requests 
received by the Information Office or other divisions of the College are 
always referred to us which only delays the filling of your ordr 1 -. 

2. Request reasonable numbers of publications which you have previously 
examined and found suitable. Agricultural Release subscribers 
receive a single copy of each new publication as it becomes available. 
New publications are also listed in the AIDS and single copies can be 
ordered for examination by any who do not receive Agricultural Releases. 

3 . We can request that quantities of publications be sent to you only 
sufficient to meet the needs of the size of your classes and it is 
understood that these publications are to become the property of your 
department. It is College policy that distribution to individual farmers is 
the function of the county farm adviser, not the vocational agriculture 
department. 

4. Quantity distribution of publications is ordinarily governed by a 
suitability rating made by an IAVAT committee. Consideration will be 
given, however, to your special needs if they do not coincide with the 
general ratings of the committee if you justify them. 

5. We can serve you better if you limit your requests to the publications that 
you need in the near future. New publications are coming out all the time 
and it may be that a better publication will be available when you need it, 
rather than to order for the distant future. 

6. Small orders for bulletins and circulars (less than 4 pounds) can be sent 

by franked mail. Larger orders will be sent by Vocational Agriculture Service 
and shipping charges can be added to your open accouit. 

MDS, August 1964 -6- 



Charge Orders for Materials from Other Divisions of the College. Items on which there is a 
charge, such as blueprints from the Department of Agricultural Engineering, etc. , can be 
ordered through Vocational Agri culture Service. These departments will charge us for the 
items and we can place the charge on your open account. 



NEW BOOKS 



The following have been added to our library since the last 
issue of the AIDS. All of our books are available for review 
in our office by those interested. As long as the editions are 
current, they will be included in such exhibits as the one at 
the Annual Conference of Vocational Agriculture Teachers. 



EDUCATORS GUIDE TO FREE FILMS 1964 $9.00 Educators Progress Service, 
Randolph, Wisconsin. 

According to information that accompanies this issue of the Guide: 

"The twenty-fourth annual edition of Educators Guide to Free Films 
is a professional, cyclopedic service, on these visual and audiovisual 
education media. . . 

"This edition replaces all volumes and supplements which have preceded 
it. It is the only complete, up-to-date, annotated schedule of FREE 
films. It brings you the compiled information on FREE films for your 
immediate use, all at your finger tips, within the covers of a single 
book. . 

"The TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL EDITION lists 4, 164 titles of films, 725 
of which were not listed in the previous edition. All new titles are 
starred (*). For the first time films cleared for TV are indicated." 

EDUCATORS GUIDE TO FREE FILMSTRIPS 1964. $6.00 Educators Progress Service, 
Randolph, Wisconsin. 

The following information is extracted from the publisher's foreword: 

"This EDUCATORS GUIDE TO FREE FILMSTRIPS is the only complete guide to 
all filmstrips and slides available free of cost (no rental, service or 
sale cost) throughout the United States Generally. It is the only such 
Guide which is restricted to free filmstrips and slides only. 

"This sixteenth annual GUIDE TO FREE FILMSTRIPS is completely 
revised. This GUIDE has stood the test of time during these 
sixteen years from that first 1949 edition. . to this current 145 - 
page edition listing 423 filmstrips and 67 sets of slides." 



AIDS, August 1964 



-7- 



Operator's manuals. The following information which appeard previously is being repeated for 
the benefit of those who may wish to use it in planning Agriculture Mechanics instruction for 
the coming year. Illinois vocational agriculture teachers wishing to order an operator's 
or owner's manual for farm tractors or equipment may write to the individual listed below. 
Be sure to list the model and year (if possible) of the tractor or implement, and allow two 
weeks for delivery. 

ALLIS CHALMERS. Carl W. Shuster, Advertising and Sales Promotions 
Department, Marketing Service and Public Relations Division, Allis 
Chalmers Mfg. Co., Box 512, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 63201 

J. I. CASE. E. F. Reiske, District Manager, J. I. Case Co., 4260 Forest 
Park Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri 

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER. W. T. Schnathorst, Supervisor Education 
Services, International Harvester Co. , 180 North Michigan Aveni' 
Chicago, Illinois 

Mr. Schnathorst informs us that they would be willing to supply individual 
copies of manuals on specific models of machines without charge. Instructors 
desiring quantities of copies of operator's manuals should contact the International 
Harvester farm equipment district office that serves their area and arrange with them 
to order the manuals on a quotation basis. 

JOHN DEERE. W. G. Berry, Deere & Co., Moline, Illinois. A reference 
copy available without charge; additional copies available at cost. 

MASSEY-FERGUSON. George Tamm, Massey, Ferguson, Inc., 6143 
Brookville Road, Indianapolis, Indiana 

NEW HOLLAND. Elmer Z. Delp, Manager of Marketing, New Holland 
Machine Company, New Holland, Pennsylvania 

NEW IDEA. Linus Hausfeld, Assistant Service Manager, New Idea Farm 
Equipment Co. , Coldwater, Ohio. Be sure to send lot number and 
serial number to get the correct manual for the implement. 

Mr. Hausfeld informs us that if teachers wish to hold farm shop meetings for 
students or farmers on adjusting or repairing equipment they may receive 
help by contacting C. R. McQuate, Branch Manager, New Idea Farm Equipment 
Co., 95 North Main Street, Sandwich, Illinois 

OLIVER George A. Franklin, Branch Manager, Oliver Corporation, 
10,000 Galena Road, Peoria, Illinois 

Mr. Franklin informs us that manuals on older models are out of px'int in 
some cases. If they have the manuals, they will supply them. 

RFE 



AIDS, August 1964 -8- 



/ s 























-^H^ 







AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION / COLLEGE OF EDUCATION / UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Votec E370, Graduate Course for First-Year Teachers of Vocational Agriculture. The 1964-65 
school year is the fifteenth consecutive year for the Division of Agricultural Education to offer 
an extramural graduate course for first-year teachers of vocational agriculture (Votec E370). 
The principal objective of the course is to help first-year teachers do better that which they are 
planning and trying to do. The folio wing groups of teachers are encouraged to enroll: 1) Teachers 
of agriculture in their first year of teaching; 2) Teachers who have been out of teaching for some 
time; 3) Teachers from other states who are teaching in Illinois for the first time. 

Class meetings include a two -day workshop on the University of Illinois campus and four 
small group meetings during the year. The small group meetings will be held in centers throughout 
the state so that teachers enrolled will be within 50 miles of a center. The small group meetings 
will begin during the week of September 21. Each teacher enrolled will receive two instructional 
visits by the instructors of the course during the academic year. 



The course will be taught by Dr. 
desiring to enroll should contact Dr. J. 
University of Illinois, Urbana. 



Gerald Fuller and Dr. J. R. Warmbrod. Teachers 
R. Warmbrod, 359 College of Education Building, 



JRW 



Technical Education in and for Rural Areas . A preliminary report of the study 'Technical 
Education in and for Rural Areas" has been made available for distribution. This report 
describes the employment opportunities and the educational and experience requirements for 
technicians and workers requiring technical training. Data were secured from a fourteen - 
county area in East Central Illinois. 

The preparation of technicians and workers requiring technical knowledge and skills is 
usually considered to be a function of post-high school institutions; however, high school 
vocational programs will need to be coordinated for maximum effectiveness. 

Later this year reports describing the implications of the technical education study 
for high school vocational agriculture programs will be available. Teachers who want a copy 
of the preliminary report described above may request a copy from the Agricultural Education 
Division, 357 Education Building, University of Illinois, Urbana. 






PEH 



AIDS, August 1964 



Votec 477 , Field Studies in Agricultural Education. Two sections or classes of Votec 477 
will be offered this fall in' northern Illinois. The locations for the two classes are Dwight and 
DeKalb. The high schools in each of these towns have been contacted regarding meeting 
places and have agreed to provide classrooms. The DeKalb class may meet in the school 
Administrative Center, downtown DeKalb, rather than in the high school. 

The first meeting for the Dwight class is scheduled for September 22. The first 
meeting for the DeKalb class is scheduled for September 23. The classes will meet from 
5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. for eight consecutive weeks unless other arrangements are made 
with the classes. The week of the National FFA Convention will be one of the exceptions 
since many teachers attend that event. 

Each enrollee will be visited at the place of his employment by the instructor during 
the period of time the course is in progress. The instructor for the course will be Dr. A. 11. 
Krebs. 

Many teachers have expressed interest in enrolling to date. Special notu are bring 
sent to all teachers in Dist. II, Sections 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10. Interested teachers fro. adjacent 
sections may enroll. Registration materials will be provided at the first meeting. Credit I 
the course is ^unit. 

This course should be of unusual interest to teachers of agriculture this fall, since the 
new State Plan for Vocational Education should be available by the time the course starts. 
All teachers will be interested in detailed consideration of how the various parts of their programe 
can be adapted to take full advantage of the provisions of the new vocational educationl act. 

AHK 

Summer Session Enrollment at the University of Illinois. The summer session enrollment 
in agricultural education at the University of Illinois topped the 100 mark for the first time 
in several years. 

Included among the enrollees were five cooperating teachers from North Carolina. 
Those teachers who were fortunate enough to be in classes with the North Carolina cooperating 
teachers would agree that they added a great deal to the interest, value, and enjoyment of the 
summer session. 

AHK 

Agricultural Education Research Conference . Members of the Agricultural Education Division 
will be attending the Central Regional Research Conference in Columbia, Missouri during the 
week of August 4, 1964. The staff study, 'Technical Education in and for Rural Ai'eas" has 
been selected as one of two studies to be reported in depth at the conference. 

Dr. Phipps and Dr. Warmbrod will be serving as co-chairmen of an experimental 
design study group, and Dr. Hemp is to serve as chairman of a pilot program research 
interest group. 

PEH 



MDS, August 1964 



Teacher Placement Report . As of July 22, 1964, fifteen Illinois schools were searching for 
vocational agriculture teachers. All the beginning teachers qualified at the University of 
Illinois during the past year have been placed. Ten experienced teachers are still on the 
active list in the Educational Placement Office. 

Names of beginning teachers and the schools where they are employed are as follows: 

Bill Cole Brownstown 

Donald Jenkins El Paso 

Vilas Scanlan East Pike (Milton) 

Earl Gudeman Manlius 

Eugene Rench Lexington 

Russell Higgins Dieterich 

George Kreider Wellington 

Gerald Raistrick Palmyra 

Wayne Sampson Annawan 

Dick Rehn Piano 

Robert Lowe Astoria 

Donnie Kunz Havana 

Robert Wheeler Norris City 

Darrell Thompson Rankin 

PEH 

Agricultural Education Division Moves. The Agricultural Education Division has moved from 
Gregory Hall to the new College of Education Building. Our offices are on the third floor and 
the agriai ltural education laboratory, seminar room, and workroom are on the ground floor. 
We believe that we now have excellent facilities that will help us extend and improve our services 
to teachers. 

The facilities got a good 'breaking in" during the 1964 summer session. By the way, the 
air conditioning is working fine. 1 You can locate us as indicated below. Mail should be addressed 
to include the staff member's office number, College of Education Building, University of 
Illinois, Urbana. Telephone number 

Room number (Area code 217 ) 

Dr. Paul Hemp 358- 333-3274 

Dr. A. H. Krebs 350 333-3165 

Dr. LoydJ. Pliipps 357A 333-0807 

Dr. Gerald Fuller 361- 333-3277 

Dr. Robert Warmbrod 359. 333-3275 

Graduate assistants 353- 333-3037 

Graduate assistants 357 333-3166 

Graduate assistants 364 333-3478 

Agricultural Education Laboratory. . 28 
Agricultural Education Seminar ... 33 
Agricultural Education Workroom • • 27 

To leave a message for one of the staff, call 333-30807 

JRW 

Votec 471 available on campus this fall. Votec 471, Policy and Policy Making for Public School 
Education in Agriculture, will be offered on campus this fall, Monday evenings, 7-9 p.m. 
Teachers within commuting distance of Urbana should check to see if this course is a part of 
their advanced degree programs. If in doubt, check with your adviser. 

AIDS, August 1964 AHK 




I A V AT 



NEWS 



ILLINOIS ASSN. OF VO-AG TEACHERS 



The District Directors of your IAVAT are as follows: District I - Clifford Sichta, 
Lanark; District II - Leroy Lawrence, Lockport; District III - Frank Young, Washington; 
District IV - Charles Schettler, Wapella; District V - John Baker, Bridgeport. At our 
Executive Committee meeting in July these men agreed to visit sectional meetings in their 
respective districts upon invitation, so far as time allowed. 

Thanks to Don Coil for making the following article available for the May 25 issue of 
U. S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT. 

" Farming industry, though declining in relative importance in the U.S., remains 
as the country's largest single enterprise. 

Farm employment , at 6.7 million, is larger than the combined labor forces of 
primary metals, metal fabricating, machinery, electrical equipment, autos. 

Agriculture is estimated to be responsible for about 40 per cent of all jobs in the 
country, including some 6 million people working to provide the goods and services that 
farmers use. 

Capital outlay of farmers in 1962 was larger than the combined total for iron and steel, 
nonferrous metals, machinery, electrical equipment, autos. 

Farm proprietors earn around 12 billion a year, net. That does not appear to be overly 
large. But gross cash income of farmers is around 45 billion a year, and that's the measure 
of farming's importance to the U. S. 

Agriculture further provides support for most of America's small towns. 

Farm spending in 1962 came to a total of 41 billion. But less than 2 billion of this 
was spent directly in cities of more than 30,000 people. 

Largest share of farm spending went to towns of 5 , 000 or less . 

Farm operators mostly fall into the class of small business. But their combined 
activities add up to a major factor in the country's economy. 



Taken from NVATA News and Views. The Leamington Hotel in Minneapolis will be the NVATA 
National Convention which is scheduled to get under way on Saturday, December 5 at 10 a.m. 
The May issue of the AMERICAN VOCATIONAL JOURNAL carries a list of hotels and rates 
together with a reservation form. 

Dues. For the sixth consecutive year, Wyoming has been the first association to remit 
dues for 100% of its members in NVATA. I hope Illinois can soon join Wyoming. 

It CAN'T happen in Illinois, can it? The following item is reprinted from the Idaho Ag Man 
at the request of those members attending the State Officers' Leadership Conference. 

"Once there was an agriculture teacher who never joined IVATA. All his life he 
took the benefits won for him by other members of the organization but he refused to join. 
Then on his deathbed he told his wife: "Dear, please do something for me. I want six 
IVATA members for pallbearers'. 'But you never belonged to the Idaho organization', 
his wife said. 'Why do you want IVATA members to be your pallbearers ?'. 'Honey', he 
replied, 'They've carried me this far— they might as well carry me the rest of the way'. 

An excellent bulletin . 'The Nature of Agricultural Occupations, Other than Farming. In 
Saline County, Missouri" is the title of an excellent new bulletin by Warren L. Griffin. 
It is issued by the Department of Agricultural Education, College of Education. Columbi; 
Missouri in cooperation with the Missouri State Department of Education. 

News. In the September issue of the Newsletter the Public Relations Officers of Sections 
[l, 2, 3, 4, & 5 are to supply the news so you can look forward to a better issue next month. 

Agricultural Education Magazine . With the thought in mind that many agriculture teachers 
order the Ag. Ed. Magazine through their school libraries, the executive committee 
suggested we print a tear sheet that can be given to your librarian. We hope this is a 
convenience to you. (and also a hint and gentle nudge). 

Tear Sheet 

Interstate Printers & Publishers 
19-27 N. Jackson Street 
Danville, Illinois 

Please send the Agricultural Education Magazine to: 

Name , 

Add re s s 

Bill to: 



-2- 



TO: Vocational Agriculture Service 
University of Illinois 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61803 



Please send the following items: 

I would like to apply for a set of FFA Roadside Signs to be reconditioned. 
Remarks: 

Teacher 

School 



TO: Vocational Agriculture Service 
University of Illinois 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 

Please send the following: (available after September 1) 

Number Price each* Total Amount Item 



$1.75 Corn Production Subject matter Packet 



*Not including postage. 

Name School_ 

Billing 



AIDS, August 1964 



INDEX TO ITEMS IN VO-AG SECTION 

Page 

Admission Problems - College of Agriculture 2 

Agricultural Releases 1 

Changes in Addressograph Plates 1 

Charge Orders for Materials from Other Divisions # < 7 

County Ag. and Home Ec. Scholarships 2 

Dairy Holders' Contest 3 

Extramural Graduate Courses in Agriculture 1 

FFA Roadside Signs 3 

Financial Management Course Materials 4 

Ulinois Farm Record Books, Problems and Keys 4 

Judging Contest Scores and Ribbons # 4 

Meat and Milk Judging Contest 4 

New Books 7 

Open Accounts 5 

Operators Manuals ° 

Participation of Agriculture College Staff Members 6 

Payment of Accounts - 5 

Policies and Procedures 5 

Reqaests for Bulletins and Circulars 6 

Shipment of Orders 5 

State Judging Contests 4 

Subject -Matter Packets 4 

Summary of Public Information Survey 3 

Surveying Kits 3 

Survey of Economics of Agriculture 5 

Survey of Teachers Offering Farm Managerment Classes 4 

VAS Order Files 3 



AIDS, August 1964 



PRICE LIST OF FEEDS 1 / 



The feed prices for many of the feedstuffs used in vocational agriculture projects are 
listed. below. This list is meant to be used as a basis of values for all boys obtaining 
their feed at home. All feed actually purchased should, of course, be recorded at 
prices paid. 

Kind Of feed May 23 June 23 

Corn,, shelled, bu 1.15 1.13 

Corn,. ground shelled, bu 1.25 1.18 

Corn, ground ear, bu 1.25 1.18 

Oats, bu 56 .55 

Oats, ground, bu .66 .65 

Barley, (feed) bu 1.08 .94 

Barley, ground or rolled, bu 1.18 1.04 

Sorghum, grain, cwt. . 2.00 2.05 

Sorghum, grain, cracked, cwt 2.10 2.15 

Garbage and kitchen waste, ton 8.50 8.50 

Skim and buttermilk, cwt. 1.50 1.50 

Whole milk, Grade B, cwt 3.00 3.00 

Corn silage, ton 12.00 12.00 

Sorghum sillage, ton 11,00 11.00 

Grass silage, ton 

No preservative added 8.00 8.00 

Preserved with 70-100 lb. molasses 11.00 11.00 

Preserved with 150-200 lb. ground corn 13.00 13.00 

Clover and mixed hay ) All hay prices are 25.00 20.00 

Alfalfa ) for baled hay 25.00 20.00 

Timothy hay ) Loose hay $5 less per ton . . . 20.00 20.00 

Oat straw or wheat straw 18.00 18.00 

1/ Prepared by W. W. Albert, Dept. of Animal Science, University of Illinois 

Urbana, Illinois _ _ „ 

Pasture Rates Cost per day 

Calves and colts, 6-11 mos. $.06 

♦Calves and colts, 12-24 mos. $.09 

♦Cattle, 24 mos. and older $.12 

Lambs to weaning $.01 

Sheep - yearlings and mature $.025 

Pigs, 50-100 lbs. $.0025 



♦Full fed cattle on pasture reduce rate by 2/3 
♦Limited fed cattle on pasture reduce rate by 1/3 

NOTE- Feed prices for July and August will be included in the September AIDS. 
AIDS, August 1964 



VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE SERVICE 

Untvonlty of Illinois - Collogo of Agriculture 

434 MUMFORD HALL • UR6ANA, ILLINOIS 



SERIALS DEPARTMENT SSHL 

UNIV OF ILL LIBRARY 



XLL 



VO-AG AIDS 



1 
Volume 22, Number 2 

September 1964 



\l 23 19 



UstMd |olnriy by 
Vocational Agriculture Service, College of Agriculture 

and 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

in Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 



VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 



Meat and Milk Judging Contest . These contests wall be held at the U. of I. campus, 
September 19, starting at 10:00 a.m. Please registei at the Stock Pavilion in time 
for the boys to be at their respective places before judging time. 

Attached to this copy of the AIDS is a self-addressed card for you to return if you plan 
to bring a team This is not a preregistration. but a means of determining the number 
>f teams to prepare for Please return this card immediately if you expect to bring one 
or both teams. 

A list of rings for each contest was included in the Judging Contest Rules sent to you 
last February, If you have misplaced your copy, we still have a few and would be glad 
to send you another one as long as the supply lasts, 

WHW 

Order blank for farm management course materials, We are including an order blank with 
this issue of the AIDS in case you have not ordered and still wish to do so. We plan to 
duplicate these materials following the September 15 date, according to the number of 
copies received by that time. Orders will then be filled as soon as possible 

JHH 

Land -Use Selection Cards . These cards for land -use contests are available from our 
office at 25 cents per package of 25, plus postage . The information on these cards is 
based on the revised Illinois Circular 758, Understanding Soils . This item will be found 
on the tear sheet for the convenience of those who may wish to order. 

RLC 



Su bject-matter packets . This is a. reminder of the September 1 release of the Corn 
Production subject-matter packets, as announced in the August AIDS, These packets 
will be available for adult classes throughout the year* The cost of this packet will be 
$L75 each, plus postage, Tins cost could be financed by charging an enrollment fee. 
If interested, please use the tear sheet in the AIDS, 

RLC 



AIDS, September 1964 -1- 



Agricultura l R elease and Advance Order Subscriptions , The October 1 deadline on placing 
subscriptions for Agricultural Releases and advance orders for slidefilms and new subject- 
matter units is approaching 

Each year we have a few teachers who send in subscriptions too late or who think they have 
subscribed. In order to avoid misunderstanding, we have listed here in alphabetical order 
Illinois schools for which we have subscriptions as of August 20 Please check this list for 
your school If listed, let us know if the information is NOT correct: Code is as follows; 

AR = Agricultural Releases 

SF = Advance order slidefilms 

10 or other number = number of sets of new subject-matter units 



If your town is not listed it means we have no subscription from jour school, 
subscribe we will gladly send an order blank on request. 



If you wish to 



•JWM 



AR 




Abingdon 


AR 




1 


Brownstown 


AR 




Colfax 


AR 




15 Albion 


AR 






Brussels 


AR 




1 umbi a 


AR 


SF 


15 Aledo 


AR 




12 


Buckley 


AR 


SF 


13 Cornell 


AR 


SF 


15 Allendale 


AR 




10 


Buda 


AR 




Crescent City 


AR 


SF 


15 Amboy 


AR 


SF 


15 


Burlington 


AR 


SF 


1 Cuba 


AR 


SF 


10 Annawan 


AR 


SF 


10 


Bushnell 


AR 


SF 


15 Cullom 


AR 




10 Areola 


AR 


SF 


10 


Byron 








AR 




10 Armington 










AR 


SF 


10 Dakota 


AR 


SF 


14 Armstrong 


AR 


SF 


30 


Cambridge 


AR 


SF 


10 Dallas City 


AR 




10 Ashland 


AR 


SF 


10 


Campbell Hill 


AR 




Danvers 


AR 




Ashley 


AR 


SF 


10 


Camp Point 


AR 


SF 


15 DeKalb 


AR 




Ashton 


AR 


SF 


4 


Carbondale 


AR 


SF 


24 Deland 


AR 


SF 


12 Assumption 


AR 






Carlinville 


AR 


SF 


15 Delavan 


AR 




Astoria 


AR 




25 


Carlyle 


AR 




10 Dieterich 


AR 




20 Athens 


AR 


SF 


10 


Carmi 


AR 


SF 


20 Dixon 


AR 


SF 


12 Atkinson 


AR 


SF 


20 


Carrollton 


AR 




15 Dongola 


AR 




15 Atlanta 


AR 




10 


Carthage 


AR 


SF 


16 Dunlap 


AR 


SF 


20 Atwood 


AR 




25 


Centralia 


AR 




DuQuoin 


AR 


SF 


10 Augusta 


AR 


SF 


15 


Cerro Gordo 








AR 


SF 


18 Aviston 


AR 


SF 


10 


Champaign 


AR 


SF 


10 Easton 


AR 


SF 


15 Avon 


AR 




12 


Chandlerville 


AR 


SF 


10 Edinburg 








AR 


SF 


25 


Charleston 


AR 


SF 


10 Effingham 


AR 


SF 


20 Barr\ 


AR 


SF 


10 


Chatham 


AR 




12 Elkhart 


AR 


SF 


20 Beason 


AR 


SF 


10 


Chatsworth 


AR 


SF 


10 Ellsworth 


AR 


SF 


10 Bellflcwer 


AR 


SF 


10 


Chenoa 


AR 


SF 


20 Elmwood 


AR 


SF 


10 Benton 


AR 


SF 


10 


Chester 


AR 


SF 


20 Enfield 


AR 


SF 


Bethany 


AR 


SF 


10 


Chrisman 


AR 


SF 


12 Erie 


AR 


SF 


10 Bismarck 


AR 




12 


Christopher 








AR 


SF 


15 Bowen 


AR 


SF 




Cisne 


AR 


SF 


10 Fairbury 


AR 




Bradford 


AR 


SF 


10 


Cissna Park 


AR 




Fairfield 


AR 


SF 


12 Bridgeport 


AR 


SF 


15 


Clay City 


AR 


SF 


24 Fairview 


AR 


SF 


20 Brimfield 


AR 


SF 




Clifton 


AR 


SF 


10 Farina 


AR 


SF 


10 Broadlands 


AR 






Clinton 


AR 




10 Farmington 








AR 






Coal City 


AR 


SF 


20 Findlay 



AIDS, September 1964 



-2- 



Agl 


ICUltU 


rai Rt 


ncl Advance 


Order 


Subsi 


3 ripf 


ions , continued 


AR 


SF 


10 




AR 


SF 




Flora 


AR 




10 


Kinderhook 


Miniei 


AR 


SF 


15 


Forrest 


Ai; 


SF 


20 


Kinmundj 


AR 


SF 


15 


M i nonk 


AR 


SF 


10 


Forreston 


AR 






Klrkland 


\i; 


SF 


10 


Minooka 


AR 


SF 


L5 


]• ranklin 










AR 


SF 


15 


Monti eel Ui 


AR 


SF 


12 


Franklin Grove 


AR 


SF 


15 


LaHarpe 


AR 


SF 


10 


Mo r risen - 


AR 




10 


Freeport 


AR 




10 


LaMoille 








ville 










AR 


SF 


25 


Lanark 


AR 




10 


Morion 


AR 






Galal La 


AR 


SI 


20 


LaSalle 


AR 


SF 


9 


Mount 


AR 


SF 


15 


lena 


AR 


SF 


20 


Lawrence\ Llle 








Auburn 


AR 






Galesbu rg 


Ail 


SF 


15 


Leaf River 


AR 


SF 


15 


Mount 


AR 


SF 


10 


( ralva 


AR 


SF 


10 


Lebanon 








Carmel 


AR 


SF 


10 


< leneseo 


AR 




10 


Lei and 


Ali 


SF 


14 


Mount 


AR 






Genoa 


AR 


SF 


20 


Lena 








Carroll 


AR 


SF 


10 


Georgetown 


AR 




10 


LeRoj 


AR 


SF 


10 


Mount 


AR 




10 


Gillespie 


AR 




20 


Lewistown 








Morns 


AR 


SF 


20 


Gilman 


AR 




10 


Lexington 


AR 


SF 




Mount 


AR 


SF 


12 


Gira rd 


AR 




15 


Libert \ 








Sterling 






20 


Lconda 


AR 


SF 


20 


Lincoln 


AR 


SF 


20 


Mount 


\R 






Gorhnm 


AR 






Litchfield 








Vemon 


\R 


SF 


10 


Grant Park 


AR 


SF 


16 


Little York 


AR 




15 


Mount Zion 


AR 


SF 


10 


Granville 


AR 




25 


Lost ant 


AR 






Mo we aqua 


AR 




10 


Greenfield 


AR 


SF 


20 


Louisville 


AR 


SF 


10 


Mulberry 


AR. 


SF 


10 


Greenview 


AI! 






Lovington 








G rove 


\R 


SF 


20 


Greenville 










AR 


SF 


20 


Murphy s - 


AR 


SF 


10 


Gridley 


AR 


SF 


12 


Mackinaw 








boro 


AR 




15 


Griggsville 


AR 


SF 


10 


Macomb 


















AR 


SF 


10 


Mahomet 


AR 


SF 


15 


Naperville 


AR 


SF 


5 


Hamilton 


AR 


SF 


10 


Malta 


AR 


SF 


20 


Nashville 


AR 


SF 


10 


Hartsburg 


AR 






Manito 


AR 


SF 


15 


Neoga 


AR 






Harvard 


AR 


SF 


15 


Manlius 


AR 






Neponset 


AR 






Hebron 


AR 






Manteno 


AR 


SF 


12 


Newark 


AR 


SF 


10 


Hennepin 


AR 






Maple Park 


AR 


SF 


13 


New- 


AR 


SF 


20 


Henry 


AR 


SF 


15 


Marengo 








Athens 


AR 




20 


Herscher 


AR 


SF 




Marion 


AR 


SF 


10 


New 


AR 


SF 


10 


Heyworth 


AR 


SF 


20 


Maroa 








Berlin 


AR 


SF 


25 


Hillsboro 


AR 


SF 




Marshall 


AR 


SF 


10 


New 


AR 




7 


Homer 


AR 


SF 


12 


Martinsville 








Holland 


AR 




10 


Hopedale 


AR 


SF 


15 


Ma scout ah 


AR 


SF 


20 


New 


AR 


SF 


20 


Huntley 


AR 


SF 


20 


Mattoon 








Lenox 










AR 


SF 


12 


Mazon 


AR 


SF 


20 


Newton 


AR 




10 


llliopolis 


AR 


SF 


15 


Mason City 


AR 




< 


Mobley) 

Newton 


AR 


SF 


15 


Jacksonville 


AR 


SF 




McLean 








(Muj'i ay) 


AR 


SF 


15 


Jerseyville 


AR 




34 


McLeansboro 


AR 






Normal 


AR 


SF 


20 


Joppa 


AR 


SF 


12 


McNabb 








(Kuster) 


AR 


SF 


12 


Joy 
Joliet 










AR 






Normal 


AR 


SF 


20 


AR 


SF 


1 


Mendon 








(Kosiba) 


AR 


SF 


10 


Kansas 


AR 


SF 


15 


Mendota 


AR 


SF 


13 


Norris 


AR 


SF 


10 


Kemp ton 


AR 


SF 


1 


Meredosia 








City 


AR 




20 


Kewanee (Damror 


1 AR 


SF 


15 


Metropolis 










AR 






Kewanee 
(Manthe) 


AR 


SF 


20 


Milford 











AroS, September 1964 



-3- 



Agri cultu ral Release and < c Order Subsc riptions, continued 



AR 


SF 


10 


Oakland 


AR 




10 


-- * " 

Raymond 


iAB 




15 


Table Grove 


AR 


SF 


20 


Oakwood 


AR 


SI- 


10 


Reddick 


AR 


SF 


20 


Taylor Ridge 


AH 


SF 




Odm 


AB 


SI- 


10 


Ridge I- it m 


AB 




1 


Taylorville 


AR 


SF 


10 


Ohio 


AR 




20 


Ridgw;i\ 


AR 


Si 


15 


Teutopolis 


AJl 






Ok;iu\ il li 


AR 


SI 


10 


Roanoke 








(Hermann) 


AR 




20 


Olnej 


\R 


SF 


15 


Roberts 


AR 






Teutopolis 






■ Winn Lngton) 


AR 


SF 


10 


Robinson 








(Weigman) 


AR 


SF 




Olnej 


AR 


SF 


20 


Roche i Le 


AR 




1 


Thompsonville 






(Washburn) 


AR 


SI- 


11 


Rochestei 


AR 


SI 


10 


Thomson 


AR 


SF 


10 


Onarga 


AB 






Rock Falls 


AR 


SF 


15 


Tonica 


AB 


SF 


15 


Orangeville 


AR 




14 


Bosevi IK' 


AB 


SF 


15 


Toulon 


AR 




10 


Oregon 


AR 




12 


Boss\ ille 


AB 


SF 


10 


Tower Hill 


AB 


SF 


20 


Orion 


\l. 




20 


St. Anne 


AB 




10 


Ti onion 


AR 


SF 


10 


Oswego 


AR 


SI- 


15 


Sr Charles 


Ai; 


SF 


20 


Tuscola 


AH 


SF 


20 


Ottawa 


AB 


SF 


20 


St. Elmo 




















SI 


9 


St, Franc ts\ tlR 


AR 




10 


Ullin 


AR 






Palesl me 


AR 


SF 




St. Jacob 










AR 


SF 


12 


Palmyra 


AB 


SF 


16 


St Joseph 


AR 


SF 


10 


Valmej er 


AR 


SF 


20 


Pa i is 


AB 


SF 


20 


Saunemin 


AR 


SF 


20 


Vandalia 


A.R 






Patoka 


AB 


SF 


30 


Salem 


AB 




20 


Vienna 


AJl 




10 


Paw Paw 


AB 




12 


indoval 


AB 


SF 


10 


Vilki Grove 


AR 


SF 


20 


Paxton 


AB 




10 


Sandwich 


AR 




15 


Virden 


AR 






Payson 


ab 


SI- 


10 


San Jose 


AR 




10 


V] rginia 


AR 


SF 


12 


Pearl City 


AR 


SI- 


5 


Sciot.i 










AJl 




15 


Pecatonie.i 


AR 


SF 


20 


Seneca 


AB 




12 


W: "limit 


AR 


SF 


14 


Pekin 


AR 




20 


Serena 


AB 






Wapella 


AR 




20 


Petersbu rg 


|lR 






Sesset 


AB 


SF 


10 


Warsaw 


AR 






Pinckneyville 


AR 


SF 


25 


Shabbona 


AB 


SF 


15 


Washbui n 


AR 


SF 


5 


Piper City 


AR 


SF 




Shannon 


AB 


SF 


20 


Washington 


AR 


SF 


10 


Pittsfield 


AB 




20 


Shelbyville 


AB 




25 


Waterloo 






(Milton) 


AB 






Sheldon 


AB 


SF 


10 


Waterman 


AR 


SF 


20 


Pittsfield 


AB 


SF 


20 


Sherrard 


AB 


SF 


15 


Watseka 






(Hi 


gh School) 


AB 


SF 


15 


Sidell 


AB 






Wayne City 


AR 


SF 


10 


Piano 


AB 


SF 


12 


Somona.uk 


AB 






Wellington 


AR 






Pleasant Hill 


J\B 


SF 


12 


Sparland 


AB 


SF 


15 


Wenona 


AR 






Pleasant Plains 


AR 


SF 


20 


Spa rta 


AB 


SF 




Westfield 


AR 


SF 


15 


Plymout h 


AR 


SF 


10 


Stanfo rd 


AB 




18 


West 


AR 


SF 


10 


Pole 


AR 


SF 


12 


Staunton 








Frank foil 


AR 


SF 


20 


Pontine 


AR 


SF 


10 


Steeleville 


AR 




10 


Willi am sfield 


AR 


SF 


20 


Popla.r Grove 


AR 


SF 


12 


Sterling 


AB 


SF 


16 


Windsor- 


AJl 




10 


Port Byron 


AB 


SF 


16 


Stillman Valley 


AB 


SF 


15 


Wolf Lake 


AR 




20 


Princeton 








AR 






Woodhull 


AR 


SF 


20 


Princeville 


AB 
:AR 
AR 


SF 


15 


Stockton 


AB 


SF 


1 


Wood! awn 


AR 


SF 


25 


Prophetstown 


SF' 
SF 


12 
1 


Stonington 
Streato r 


AB 


SF 


20 


Woodstock 


AR 




20 


Quincy 


'AR 
!AB 


SF 
SF 


12 
10 


(Township) 
Streator 
(Woodland) 
Sycamore 


AB 






Yates City 



AIDS, September 1964 



The following was provided by Mr 
Springfield. 



R. A Guthrie Chief of Agricultural Education, 



INTENSIVE SHORT COURSES IN FARM MANAGEMENT 

The 25 intensive short courses in farm management (one per section) have been completed 
with excellent attendance. Many favorable comments have been received from the teachers 
who participated. If these comments are a criteria by which to evaluate the courses, the 
teachers who did not attend surely missed some valuable information. Such favorable 
comments as these- were made: 'Saves individual teacher days of time in preparing source 
units;" "I received ideas and information that I. have needed for years;" "Course very well 
organized. Information will be of practical value and easy to organize for use in our own 
classes;" "A very educational day;" "Well worth the time;" and 'This is material that I 
certainly feel will enable us to help our farmers in our communities." 

The unfavorable comments can be summarized in the following comments: "Too stinking 
hot;" 'Too much material for the time allowed;" 'Should be at least a two-day course." 

The teachers in attendance overwhelmingly recommended the continuation of these courses 
and suggested the following areas for consideration: (1) animal science; (2) agricultural 
education programs under the new legislation; and (3) farm mechanics, 

The time of year used was satisfactory for holding these classes 72,5 percent of the 
teachers reported 

We who work with the program appreciate the professional attitude displayed by those who 
participated in the program. To keep agricultural education progressive we must continue 
to upgrade and update our instructional programs . 

Summary of Attendance at Short Courses 



Year Course 

1964 Farm Management 

1963 Farm Management 

1962 Soils and Fertilizers 

1961 Soils and Fertilizers 

1960 Farm Machinery 

1959 Farm Machinery 

1958 Farm Tractors 



Teachers 


Attendance 


Percentage 


454 


331 




72.9 


465 


312 




67,0 


475 


329 




69.2 


485 


334 




69.2 


493 


303 




61,4 


506 


316 




63.0 


(records not available) 










RAG/JWM 



FFA Roadside Signs , As announced in the August AIDS, funds have been budgeted by 
the Illinois Foundation FFA for an expanded program of reconditioning roadside signs 
during the current school year. The tear sheet is repeated in the back of this issue 
for your convenience in applying, if you would like to have your signs reconditioned. 

JWM 



AIDS, September 1964 



NEW BOOKS 



The following have been added to our library since the last 
issue of the AIDS. All of our books are available for review 
in our office by those interested, As long as the editions are 
current they will be included in such exhibits as the one at 
the Annual Conference of Vocational Agriculture Teachers 

Teachers who are interested in securing copies for then- 
own use should write di red to the publisher 



EDUCA TORS G UIDE TO FREE TAPES, S CRI PTS AND TRANSCRIPT IONS 1964 $5 75 



Educators Progress Service 



Randolph, Wisconsin, 



The following information is taken from the Guide: 

'The eleventh edition is completely new and is devoted exclusively to 
selected free tapes, free scripts and free transcriptions It is a 
complete up-to-date, annotated cross-media schedule of selected audio 
aids and scripts — bringing you the compiled information on these 
selected free educational enrichment audio and script materials, all at 
your fingertips, within the covers of a single took," 

EDUCATORS GUIDE TO FREE CURRICULUM MATERIALS , 1964. $7 50 Educators 
Progress Service. Randolph. Wisconsin 

Publisher's statements include the following: 

'This volume replaces all preceding editions. Limiting the content of 
the guide to about 1,200 titles, and using about 50% of the available 
acceptable listings, together combine to make the materials listed in 
this edition most highly selective, . , .This edition lists 1,253 items of 
which 513, or 41.0%, are new All new items are starred . . .Materials 
are available from 534 sources, of which 148 are new this year, ......... 

"This guide is a complete, up-to-date, annotated schedule of selected 
free maps, bulletins, pamphlets, exhibits, charts, and books. It brings 
you the compiled information on this vast array of worthwhile free 
educational materials for your immediate use, all at your fingertips, 
within the covers of a single took," 

HUNGER SIGNS IN CROPS . 1964, $15 00 Howard B Sprague, Editor in Chief 
David McKay Company, New York, New York 

The following was taken from the editor's foreword to the third edition. 

"This third edition presents . concise, lucid, and accurate descriptions 
of the visible symptoms of nutrient deficiencies in economic crops 

"... .All of the chapters appearing in earlier editions have been revised in 
text, illustrations, and color plates to present the current status of know- 
ledge in each crop. They include much added information on essential trace 



AIDS, September 1964 



-6- 



elements--zinc . molybdenum, copper, manganese, iron and boron-- 
that have become increasingly important i n crop production 
Occurence of deficiencies in calcium, magnesium, and sulfur, has 
increased in the last decade; thus, more attention is given to them, 
without neglecting the major elements — nitrogen, phosphorus, and 
potassium , 

"An outstanding and unique feature of Hunger Signs in Crops has been 
its plates showing symptoms of nutrient deficiences in natural crops, 
This third edition has 110 pages of color presenting 193 full color 
illustrations. . . . . " 

Agronomy Day, 1964 . The College of Agriculture is holding its annual Agronomy Day 
on Thursday, September 10. The tours will begin at 9-00 a.m. at the Agronomy South 
Farm Lunch will be available at the farm, All students, adult farmers, and teachers 
arc welcome You will see results of the latest research in progress = 

RLC 



AIDS, September 1964 























l^-"-v^ 







AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION / COLLEGE OF EDUCATION / UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Course outlines . Three course outlines developed by Illinois vocational agriculture teachers 
as a part of their graduate study programs have been mimeographed for distribution. 
Ornamental Horticulture is a one-year course outline prepared by Harold Drake of Waterloo 
and Robert Milligan of Mascoutah. Agricultural Business is the title of a one-year outline 
developed by a committee of seven teachers enrolled in VOTEC 456 during the 1964 summer 
session. Agricultural Business Management , developed by Wayne Sampson, Annawan, includes 
outlines for 25 areas of study. 

Teachers of agriculture who are planning to reorganize the vocational agriculture curricula 
at their schools may wish to request single copies of the above course outlines from the 
Agricultural Education Division. 

PEH 

VOTEC 471 . Registration for VOTEC 471, Policy and Program Development in Agricultural 
Education, may be completed on Saturday, September 19, from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The 
registration offices will NOT be open on any following Saturday. 

The first meeting of this campus graduate course in agricultural education will be Monday 
evening, September 21, 7:00-9:00 p.m. Teachers within commuting distance of Urbana 
should enroll in this course if it is listed as a part of their advanced degree programs. 
If in doubt, check with your adviser. 

LJP 

First -year teachers' course . There is still time to enroll in VOTEC E370, an extramural 
course for new- or returning teachers of agriculture. Beginning teachers, men returning to 
teaching from other work, and out-of-state teachers employed for the first time in Illinois, 
are eligible to enroll for one-half unit of graduate credit. Four evening meetings will be 
held at centers convenient to the enrollees. In addition, each enrollee will be visited twice 
by the instructors. The course will be concerned with problems usually encountered 
during the first year of work in Illinois. Dr. J. Robert Warmbrod and Dr. Gerald R. 
Fuller are teaching the course. Interested persons may enroll by contacting Dr. Warmbrod 
or Dr. Fuller, 347 College of Education Building, University of Illinois, Urbana. 

LJP 



AIDS, September 1964 



-1- 



VOTEC 477 Field Studies in A g ricultural Education . All agriculture teachers in District II 
and other agriculture teachers near DeKaJb and Dwight are reminded of the beginning of 
VOTEC E477. The class sessions at DeKalb will start September 22 and at Dwight on 
September 23. 

Special consideration in the course will be given to the implementation of the Vocational 
Education Act of 1963. 

LJP 

Vocational Agriculture Summer Experience Program — VOTEC 275 . Student teachers for 
1964-65 at the University of Illinois are now participating in a two- or three-week summer 
experience program. They will gain experiences in the summer work of an agriculture 
teacher and participate in the opening of school at their student teaching centers. Dr. 
Gerald R. Fuller is supervising the students enrolled in VOTEC 275. 

LJP 

Teacher placement . Eight vacancies in vocational agriculture departments were listed 
as of August 14, 1964, but only three available teachers were listed on the active list. 
By employing qualified teachers from other states and persons who have been working 
outside of the teaching field, most schools have been able to fill their vacancies. A 
summary report of placement during the past year will appear in the October issue of 
the AIDS. 



PEH 



AIDS, September 1964 



ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY 
DCPAITMENT OF AGRICUtTURf 

NOIMAL, ILLINOIS 4)761 




AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



Summer Experience in Agricultural Education, Agr. 295 . Student teachers are now 
participating in a three -week summer experience program in vocational agriculture 
departments. The students will participate in the summer work of a teacher of 
vocational agriculture and the opening of school in their student teaching centers. 
The 17 schools with cooperating teachers providing experience programs in their 
departments and students are as follows: 



Student teacher 



School 



Cooperating teacher 



Ronald Skinner 


Dwight 


Ronald Seibel 


James A. Winslow 


Eureka 


Arthur Phillips 


William. P. Decker 


Flanagan 


Howard E. Cotter 


Laverne M alone 






John Blessent 


Kirkland 


John M. Olson 


Edward F. Stokes 






Ned Richardson 


LeRoy 


R. Donald Bateman 


Lee Duringer 


Maro a -Forsyth 


Melvin Nicol 


Dale Stallings 






Richard Hanson 


Morris 


Donald Kaufman 


Henry McClenning 






Dugene H. Wagner 


New Lenox 


Robert R. Van Rheeden 


Donald Wilson 






Carl Hart 


Normal 


Clarence Kuster 


George Andes 






Larry Stevenson 


Peotone 




Donald Toepke 






Richard Allen 


Pontiac 


Daren Cox 


Harley W. Hicks 


Princeville 


E. L. Rice 


Lloyd G. Gaylor 






Jerrv Crump 


Streator 


Donald Higgs 


Daniel Leathers. 


Wapella 


Charles Schettler 


Darel Zook 






Jack Niles 


Washington 


Frank Young 


Ray L. Brownfield 


Williamsfield 


James Guilinger 


Steve. Bruce 






Don Mueller 


Yorkville 


Marion F. Welles 


William Speers 







KEJ 



Teacher Placement Report. Two men will qualify for vocational agriculture teaching 

at Illinois State University on November 13 and will be available for placement. 

They are William Decker of Strawn and Laverne Malone of Maroa. 

KEJ 



^fi 




ikVAT 



NEWS 



ILLINOIS ASSN. OF VO-AG TEACHERS 



A BETTER TOMORROW * 

Only a little more than 1% of vocational agriculture students (in Minnesota) were 
unemployed six months after graduation When you compare this with the national 
rage of 15-18% unemployed for this age group, vocational agriculture and FFA 
Lning assume an important stature in the eyes of all businessmen, 

The low rate of unemployment is, in itself, a testimonial to the quality of instruction 
which these students receive in both their classrooms and their project work. This 
type of training is an asset of immense importance, not only to them but to their future 
mployers as well As a businessman, I can give you my personal assurance that the 
mphasis you place on the value of these young men's future is vital for the preservation 
E the business in the future --whether it be farming, or milling, or insurance, or any 
ther enterprise, 

"You have a unique opportunity and responsibility in shaping young men. You as 
counselors, have a very effective tool which, 1 might add, many teachers do not have. 
Through the FFA your relationship with the student takes on an aspect somewhat 
different from the ordinary student -teacher contact, In many cases, you are able to 
reach students where others may fail--because of their built-in interest in FFA, Your 
role, then, in the high school drop-out problem is certainly an important one. Your 
efforts may very well be the influence which will keep a disinterested student in school. 
Yes, your opportunities and responsibilities as counselors are unique and so important 
to the future of all of us," 

*Excerpts from an address by Philip W, Pillsbury to the Minnesota Vocational 
Agriculture Instructors' Association, sponsored by the Minneapolis Chamber 
of Commerce, Mr, Pillsbury is chairman of the board, the Pillsbury Company, 

Taken from News and Views of NVATA , 

The Heart of Illinois Fair sponsors an FFA Tug-of-War contest each year, $100, 00 in 
premiums have enticed from 12 to 16 teams to participate in the event each year and the 
spectators love it, First place pays $50 and a trophy; second, $25 and a rosette; third, 
$15 and a rosette; and fourth, $10 and a rosette, Williamsfield has won three years 
straight; the rest of us are dragging our feet, but it has not helped much, 



AIDS, September 1964 



There was quite a bit of discussion at the NVATA summer conference regarding an 
advisor's blazer and a corduroy field jacket. The membership preferred to have an 
NVATA emblem rather than the FFA emblem on the advisor's jacket and to make the 
advisor emblem optional. 

Did you know? 

The Indiana Agricultural Teachers' Association invites members of the State 
Board of Vocational Education to a dinner meeting? 

Ohio has a tractor trouble -shooting contest? 

Kentucky has a state welding contest ? 

Missouri has a state farm mechanics contest that includes welding? 

Michigan has an Agricultural Council made up of all agricultural interests in the 
state, and they feed all of the state senators and representatives at a big banquet? Loot 
bags are supplied with products of the agricultural manufacturers' products. 

The IVA Convention will be held at the Pere Marquette Hotel in Peoria on February 25, 
26, and 27, 1965. 

If you appreciate your split year d-Con diary, a letter to Hamilton Hicks of the d-Con 
company might enhance continuation of the project. It was suggested at the NVATA 
summer conference that an earlier month be put in the beginning of the diary, plus an 
additional year on the back cover to help facilitate the change over each year, plus 
ordering dates for a year or more ahead. If you have an opinion, let me hear from you. 

Your letters of appreciation for the diaries should be sent to 

Hamilton Hicks, Educational Director 

The d-Con Company 

1450 Broadway 

New York 18, New York 

Tom Fitzsimmons, Public Relations Officer for Section 5, sent out a questionnaire with 
seven pertinent questions. The results were as follows: 

1. In your opinion, 'Is the new bill going to have the desired effect on vocational 
agriculture?" Nine said yes; 3 acknowledged lack of information, and 1 thought, 
"no change". 



AIDS, September 1964 -2- 



2. What effect does an adult program have on the QUALITY of classroom 
instruction? Five thought it lowered the quality. 7 thought it raised 
the quality, and 1 thought it unchanged, 

3. Where does the FFA stand in the new program ? Two thought better, 

5 thought worse, 3 could see no change, and 1 was undecided. 

4. Should we change the FFA name? Seven thought yes, 6 thought no. 

5. Where does the primary responsibility of the vocational agriculture 
instructor lie? STUDENT or ADULT? Eight thought student, 2 
said "community", 2 thought equal responsibility, and 1 was 
undecided. 

{ - E - L - P '.".'.' We need to hear from more public relations officers 

jji case your librarian was not on the job when you received the August issue of the 
Vo-Ag AIDS, another tear sheet for the Agricultural Education Magazine is 
ncluded in this issue. 



Interstate Printers and Publishers 
19-27 North Jackson Street 
Danville, Illinois 

Please send the Agricultural Education Magazine t o: 
Name 



Address 



Street Town 

BILL to: 



AIDS, September 1964 -3- 



T am sure every mem be 1 o] LA\ AT was shocked and saddened at the sudden death of four 
former members of IAVAT <>\ er the week end of August 15-16. They were: Rollin 
Williams, former agriculture teacher al Salem, recently a county superintendent; T W 
Clarida, who formerly taught al ( entralia; N J Smith, former teacher at Monticello: 
and N„ H, Anderson io rmer teacher at Yates Cm Though sympathy is small consola- 
tion even when it springs from the hearts of those who share the sorrow, we want the 
families to know how keenly these men's loss is felt, and to tell them of the respect and 
admiration in which these men were held by all who worked with them We only wish it 
were within our power to alleviate the sadness that has come to their respective families. 



AIDS, September 1964 -4- 



To Vocational Agriculture Service 
University of Illinois 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61803 



Please send the following items: 



I would like to apply for a set of FFA roadside signs to be reconditioned. 
Remarks: 



Teacher: 
School: 



Address: 



To Vocational Agriculture Service 
University of Illinois 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61803 

Please send the following: (available after September 1) 

Price Total 

Number each* amount Item 



Corn Production subject-matter packet 



*Not including postage. 

Name School_ 

Address 

Billing 



AIDS, September 1964 



ORDER BLANK FOR FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT COURSE MATERIALS 



This sheet shows the items available through Vocational Agriculture Service 
and handed out or used at the one -day short course. We will accept orders 
until September 15, 1964 and will then duplicate and distribute copies as soon 
as possible. Illinois circulars or subject matter units referred to in the course 
are, of course, available as usual. 



To: Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 

Please send the following items: 

No. of Price of Total 

copies each * amount 

6? 

12£ 

6? 

16£ 

T$ 

3£ 

3£ 

2? 

3? 

2? 

3<? 

16£ 

8? 

12£ 

3? 

10£ 

12£ 

3? 

3? 

25£ 

* Price does not include postage 



Title 



Farm and Family Business Management 

Part HI. Family Economics 
Farm and Family Business Management 

Part IV. Farm Business Adjustments, 

Alternative Plans, Annual Financial Operation. 
Farm and Family Business Management 

Part V. Financing the Farm Business 
Farm Business Adjustments for Improved 

Efficiency, Increased Income. 
The New Illinois Commercial Code and 

Farm Financing 
Michigan State Ext. Folder F-322, Interest 

Rate Calculator 
Farm and Family Financial Budget Form 
Farm and Family Financial Planning Problem 
Our Net Worth Statement Form 
Sheet: Costs of Alternative Corn Harvesting 

Methods (Lines and columns are blank.) 
Problem: How Much Capital is Needed to Change 

the Method of Harvesting Corn? (4 -page leaflet) 
Economic Considerations in Choosing a Corn 

Harvesting Method 
Guides for Use in Planning Hog Production Systems 
Guides for Use in Planning Beef Feeding Systems 
Michigan State Ext. Folder, F-320, Planning 

Family Insurance 

Cornell Ext. Bulletin 1002, Life Insurance for 

Farm Families 
Farm Management Manual 
Form , " Income Possibilities on Your Farm" 
Partial Budget Form (double sheet of 4 forms) 
Slidefilm, Insurance in the Farm Business 

(Country Companies Insurance and VAS) 



Name 



School 



AIDS, September 1964 



INDEX TO ITEMS IN VO-AG SECTION 



Page 
number 



Agronomy Day, 1964 7 

Agricultural Releases and Advance Order Subscriptions 2,3,4 

FFA Roadside Signs 5 

Intensive Short Courses in Farm Management 5 

Land-Use Selection Cards 1 

Meat and Milk Judging Contest 1 

New Books 6,7 

Order Blank for Farm Management Course Materials 1 

Subject-matter Packets 1 



AIDS, SEPTEMBER 1964 



PRICE LIST OF FEEDS* 

July 25. 1964 

The feed prices for many of the feedstuffs used in vocational agriculture projects are 
listed below. This list is meant to be used as the basis of values for all boys obtaining 
their feed at home. All feed actually purchased should, of course, be recorded at 
prices paid. 



Kind of feed 

Corn**, shelled, bu. . 
Corn, ground shelled, bu. 

i , ground ear, bu . 

Oats.bu 

Oats, ground, bu. 

ley, feed, bu. 

ley, ground or rolled, bu. . 

hum grain ,cwt. . 
•ghum graiir, cracked cwt . ■ 

bage and kitchen waste, ton 
Skim and buttermilk, cwt. 
milk, Grade B , cwt. 
■n silage, ton .... 
Sorghum silage, ton . 
Grass silage, ton 

No preservative added 

Preserved with 70-100 lb. 

Preseved with 150-200 lb. 
Clover and mixed hay ...... 

Alfalfa (Quoted for baled forages). 

Timothy hay (Loose hay and straws $5, less per ton). 

Oat and wheat straw ...... 



Cost per bu . . cwt, 
or tons in dollars 



molasses . 
ground corn 



$ 



112 

1 22 

1.22 

.58 

.68 

.96 

1.06 

2,12 

2,22 

8.50 

1.50 

3, 00 

10.00 

9.00 

8.00 
9.00 
10.00 
22.00 
22.00 
20,00 
18.00 



Pasture Charges Per Day 



Calves and colts, 6 to 11 months 

(reduce by 2/3 for full-fed cattle). . . 
Calves and colts, 12-24 months ...... 

Calves and colts, 24 months and over 
Lambs to weaning. .................. 

Sheep , yearling and mature. ......... 

Pigs . 50 to 100 pounds. .............. 



$.06 

$.09 
.$,12 
$.01 
$.025 
$.0025 



* Prepared by W. W. Albert, Department of Animal Science, University of 
Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 

**High-moisture com to be discounted at the rate of one cent for each one-half 
percent moisture above 15.5 percent. 



AIDS, September 1964 



VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE SERVICE 

Unlvcnlry of tlllnolt ■ Callage of Agriculture 

434 MUMFORD HALL • URBANA, ILLINOIS 



S2r, " ' NT SSHL 

UNIV OF ILL LIBRA 



ZLL. 



VO-AG AIDS 



Volume 23, Number 3 
October 1964 






Issued jointly by 
Vocational Agriculture Service, College of Agriculture 

end 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

in Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 



VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 



Agricultural Releases for 1964-65. The first shipment of Agricultural Releases is being- 
assembled and should reach you a few days after you receive the October AIDS. The October 
issue of Releases is usually one of the largest as it includes a number of items that have 
accumulated over the summer. If you have ordered Releases and do not receive yours 
promptly, or if you find any errors in packing, addressing, etc. , please let us know and 

we will do our best to correct the situation. T„r»„ 

JWM 



Bulletins and Circulars from the College of Agriculture . Since the last issue of the AIDS, 
we have received seven new circulars and two new bulletins. Numbers, titles, and prices 
for out-of-state distribution are as follows: 



Circular 885 

Circular 886 
Circular 888 
Circular 889 

Circular 890 
Circular 891 
ilar 892 
Bulletin 700 
Bulletin 701 



Family Planning of Titles and Taxes in the Transfer of Farm 

Property - 15£ 

Plant Regulators: Their Use as a Hobby - 10£ 

Recommendations for Housing and Management of Layers - 3£ 

Laws and Regulations Concerning Recreation in Rural Areas 

of Illinois - 10$ 

Using Agricultural Credit - 5£ 

1963 Summary of Illinois Farm Business Records - 15£ 

Controlling Quackgrass in Illinois - 5£ 

Apple Marketing in Illinois - 45£ 

Some Mineralogical Properties of Seaton, Fayette, and Clinton 

Soils in Illinois - 20£ 



Single copies of the above circulars are being sent in October Releases, 
not sent but may be requested by those especially interested. 



The bulletins were 
JWM 



Farmstead and Farm Building Planning Aid . 



This is the title of Agricultural Engineering- 



tip sheet No. 25. A copy is included in October Releases and will be sent without charge to 
any Illinois teacher who requests it, Limited quantities are available from the Department 
of Agricultural Engineering on request after you have examined a single copy. 

JWM 



Electrical Controls Kit Program . Five new electrical controls kits will be available to 
teachers in Sections 1, 12, 17, 19, and 22 early in October. Arrangements are being mr.de 
to get these kits into the hands of the power supplier representatives or others who will he 
handling them by the time you read this. Sectional chairmen should contact the following- 
individuals in rega.rd to scheduling a training course within the section for those teachers 
who wish to use the controls kit. 

Section 1 - V. M. Bokemeier, Voc ; Agr. Instructor, Freeport 
Section 12 - Mark Kemper, Central Illinois Light Company, Peoria 

Lyle Phillips, Central Illinois Public Service Company, Havana 
Section 17 - Voc. Agr . Service, Urbana 

Section 19 - Len Seaman, Shelby Electric Cooperative, Shelbyville 
Section 22 - Robert Vander Pluym, Clinton County Electric Cooperative, Breese . 



AIDS, October 1964 



Persons In Charge of Electric Motors Kits . The following power supplier representatives 
and others are in charge of the Vocational Agriculture Service electric motors kits for the 
school year 1964-65. The kit should be checked out and taken back to one of the men in 
charge for your section, according to the schedule made up at your sectional meeting 



Section 



Name 



1 


Howard E. Hetric 


2 


Robert E . Liehr 


3 


LeRoy V. Hard 




M. M. Jontz 


4 


John Hurt 


5 


John Ewan 




Mark Kemper 


6 


George Forgey 


7 


R. K. May 


8 


Marion F. Welles 


9 


Joe Crosno 


10 


C. C. Benbow 


11 


Lester Aeilts 




Roy C. Kerr 


12 


Lyle Phillips 




Mark Kemper 


13 


Roger C. Mohrma 


14 


Roy Goode 




Dorland Smith 



15 

16 
17 

18 
19 
20 

21 

22 
23 
24 

25 



Karl Longenbaugh 
Ray Thompson 

John L. Ingham 

Charles C. Shaw 
Cy Anderson 



Tex Davis 

L, W. Seaman 

Randall Beasley 
Carl Mitchell 

Andy Bird 
Vic Ketten 

Robert Vander Pluym 

Roy L Morris 

H. M. Parker 

Jack Wiggins 



AIDS, October 1964 



Address 
Central 111. Electric and Gas. Co. 
303 N. Main Street, Rockford 

Morrison Community High School, Morrison 

Farmers Mutual Electric, Co. , Geneseo 
Illinois Valley Electric Cooperative, Princeton 

Illinois Power Co. , 1144 Monmouth Blvd. , 
Galesburg 

Central Illinois Light Co. , Lacon 

Central Illinois Light Co. , 300 Liberty, Peoria 

Woodstock Community High School, Woodstock 

Illinois Power Co. , 200 Marquette St. , LaSalle 

Yorkville Community High School, Yorkville 

Corn Belt Electric Cooperative, Bloomington 

Central Illinois Public Service Co. , Watseka 

Western Illinois Electric Cooperative, Carthage 
Central 111. Public Service Co. , Macomb 

Central 111. Public Service Co. , Havana 
Central 111. Light Company, 200 Liberty, Peoria 

Adams Electric Cooperative, Camp Point 

Rural Electric Convenience Cooperative, Auburn 
Menard Electric Cooperative, Petersburg 

Illinois Rural Elec. Cooperative, Winchester 
Central HI. Public Service Company, Jerseyville 

Illinois Power Company, 2460 N.. Jasper, Decatur 

Central 111 Public Service Co, , Paxton 
Eastern 111. Power Cooperative, Paxton 
(Kit usually at VAS Shop and Storage Bldg, ,Urbana) 

Illinois Power Company. 24 S Vermillion, Danville 

Shelby Electric Cooperative, Shelbyville 

Coles -Moultrie Electric Cooperative, Mattoon 

Norris Electric Cooperative, Newton 

Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Mt, Vernon 
Southwestern Electric Cooperative, Greenville 

Clinton County Electric Cooperative. Breese 

Wayne-White Counties Elec. Coop. , Fairfield 

Central 111. Pub. , Service Co. , 405 N 111. Ave. . 
Carbondale 

North Gallatin Community Schools, Ridgway 
-2- 



County Scholarship Application for 1965. The following reminder was provided by Dean 
Karl E. Gardner. It concerns the application for count} - scholarships to the University of 
Illinois for the fall of 196 

"All county tuition scholarships to the University of Illinois for Fall 
1965 will be awarded on the basis of the November 7. 1964 , ACT (American 
College Testing) examination, BUT application must be made at least three 
weeks in advance of the examination date to the principal of the high school 
or the county superintendent of schools, preferably by October 1. 1964 . 

For the student who keeps himself in good academic standing, these 
scholarships exempt the scholarship holder from paying tuition fees which 
amount to $85 per semester or $680 for the customary eight semesters of 
work at the University. 

Each county has one agriculture scholarship and one home economics 
scholarship. In addition, there are the customary two county scholarships 
(more in populous counties), and the scholarships for the children of veterans 
of World War I, World War II. and the Korean War. Many of these county 
scholarships go '"a-begging." 

KEG -JWM 

1964 Problem for Use with the Illinois Farm Record Book . The problem and key have now 
been brought up-to-date with minor revisions. New prices on these items are 5C each for 
the problem and 250 for the teacher's key, plus postage. These can be ordered at any time. 
If included with an order for record books, we will hold orders until such time as the record 
books become available, unless you specify otherwise. A single copy of the problem is in- 
cluded with the October Ag. Releases. ,„„ 

Illinois Farm Record Books, Parts I and II. These are being reprinted again for the coming 
year. We understand that they are to become available sometime between November 1 and 
15. We will till orders as soon as possible. ,„„ 

Financial Management Materials . We have duplicated some of these materials and ordered 
all the others necessary to fill the individual orders received to date. We hope that our 
supplies will arrive shortly. If we have appreciable quantities of any of the items remaining, 
we expect to list them in next month's AID.- T „„ 

Meat and Milk Judging Contes t. Fifty teams participated in the meat judging contest and 33 
in milk. The contests were held at Urbana on Saturday. September 19, 1964= Sterling won 
the meats contest and will represent Illinois in the national contest at Kansas City on October 
14. Bismarck won the Milk contest and will judge in the national at Waterloo Iowa on 
October 6. ^ 

$30 College Scholarship . Through the thoughtfulness of Pre ss E. L. Kr..:Ac our office 
has received an announcement of a weed control essay contest for a S300 college scholarship 
at the national level and £2 .ward to each state winner. These awards are presented by 
the north-central Weed Control Conference to the boy or girl who submits the winning 5S 
of approximately 1.000 words entitled "How We Control Weeds on Our Farm." A oc ; he 

contest rides is enclosed with this issue of the AIDS for Illinois teachei - 

Essays should be sent to Bill Craig. Extension Weec 3S -.int. N416 Turner Hall. Uni 
of Illinois. Urbana. by October 31, 1964. R . 

AIDS. October 1964 -3- 



Swift & Co Slide Sets, Mr. Don Moeller of Swift & Co. , has sent us the following an- 
nouncement of slide sets that they have available. If you are interested in any of these, 
contact Mr. Don Moeller direct. His address is 

Agricultural Research Division 
Swift & Co , 
115 W. Jackson Blvd. 
Chicago, Illinois 60604 

If you order any of the slides, send check, cash, or money order. Make all checks payable 
to Swift & Co . 

The slide sets are as follows: 

'YOUR STAKE IN MEAT TYPE HOGS" 

This set of 31 slides seUs for S3. 50. It is accompanied with a 
commentary of 14 triple spaced pages. Average time of presentation 
would be about 30 minutes. 

The story tries to show the need for increased efforts to produce 
more meat hogs. Consumer dollar expenditure, retail values, test re- 
sults and various live hog and pork cut pictures are presented in such a 
way to try and convince the audience that meat hogs are the only hogs 
producers should be planning to produce. 

"THE STORY OF THREE S'S" 

The 11 slides in this set and accompanying commentary are 
available for $1. 50, Average time of presentation will be about 25 
minutes. 

This basic set tells the story on how Shrink. Service and 
Selection makes up the spread of 89C between SI. 09 steak and 20c 
cattle. On your own, additional slides showing pictures of live animals 
and cuts of meat can be added. The set was kept to a minimum num- 
ber of slides to help reduce the cost. 

"GRUB CONTROL" 

This set contains 18 slides and sells for $2.50, A commentary- 
accompanies the set. Average time of presentation will be about 25 
minutes. 

The set of slides shows the life cycle of the heel fly, damaged 
carcasses and hides, various methods of treatment using systemic 
grubicides, and the script gives some of the economic factors related 



to grub losses. 



DM \VH\V 



Forest tree application forms. Through the cooperation of Professor W. F. Bulkley, we 
are enclosing an application for forest tree planting stock and a listing of trees available 
for reforestation purposes. These application forms are being sent to vocational agricul- 
ture teachers in Illinois because the stock is available only to Illinois landowners. The 
nurseries will accept orders between September 1, 1964 and April 16, 1965. RTr 

Subject -Matter Packets . Teachers who have ordered the "Corn Production Packets" may 
expect to receive them in a few days. Additional packets will be available on request 
throughout the year for SI. 7 5 each f.o.b. Urbana. The tear sheet is repeated in the back 
of this issue for vour convenience, if vou desire packets for adult classes on corn produc- 

ti0n " RLC 

AIDS, October 1964 -4- 



In-Service s Scheduled. The following cou . 

tively scheduled Teachers in the sections involved wi 
cases there is room for a few additional teachers from 
ally interested. If you are from outside the aan 

early. We will, in turn, notify the host school and inc 






October 3 


Electric motors 


Section IS 




October 6 


Electric wiring 


Maroa, Section 16 


- z . :■:. 


October 17 


Surveying 


Carbondal 


:0 a.m. 


October 19 


Small engines 


--_--._ 


Z..—. 


October 26 


Electric Mot: 


Zion, Sztion 16 


4 p.m. 


Novemtx 


ay painting 


Freeport, Section 1 




December 5 


Surveying 


oella. S - ."ion 16 


r 


December 12 


. ictor Tune -Up 


rwood, Sectior 18 


:' 2. . 7'S.„ 



cation and starting time to be detei 



.--.:-" z 



Soil samples of known soil-te-: ..._e . The Field and f 
Standard soil samples of known soil ach s 

S -:ing Laboratory-. The 

value : 



.ole 












_pH_ 


PI 


P2 


K 


1 


6.9 


13 


115 


14C 


_ 




6 


9 


I -: 


3 


i 


:: 


53 


.- 


— 


5.9 


__ 


33 


__. 


5 


6.0 


15 




210 


6 


6.6 


17 


7 


■ ; : 



Individual sample s - r $15.00 ft 

are sent in paper plastic lined bags, bv 

'-.eir original s due. Tnev are 



RLC 



Controls K;- Z:,: :--. ;'.,-.- _ ise 16 in the elect! 

in tc - - Lsed. Thi£ 

a motor. Trie DP- - rn rt 

of the ten - ?ed copies of 7 _ 

purchased ses last - 

of AIDS Sets ::'■-. ses 1 ourcha- 



ses as us 

- itch in ■ 






AIDS. October 1964 



- - 



NEW BOOKS 



The following have been added to our library since the last 
issue of the AIDS. All of our books are available for re- 
view in our office by those interested. As long as the 
editions are current, they will be included in such exhibits 
as the one at the Annual Conference of Vocational Agriculture 
Teachers. 



MIDWEST FARM HANDBOOK 1964. Staff, College of Agriculture, Iowa State University. 
$3.95, Iowa State University Press, Ames, Iowa. 

The following is quoted from statements made by the publisher: 

'The Sixth Edition of the Midwest Farm Handbook. . . is designed to be 
a working tool for farmers, vo-ag workers, and extension personnel, 
and presents information for practical, profitable, and efficient farming. 

'Written by staff members of the College of Agriculture at Iowa State, the 
book provides the answers to many of the questions that come up daily 
around the farm. . . Much of the material is illustrated with photographs, 
diagrams and charts, including 16 pages in color. 

"The 474-page Midwest Farm Handbook, Sixth Edition, may be purchased 
from bookstores or from the Iowa State University Press at Ames for 
$o . 95 . 

EDUCATORS GUIDE TO FREE SOCIAL STUDIES MATERIALS 1964. $6.75. Educators 
Progress Service, Randolph, Wisconsin. 

Following statements are excerpted from the publisher's foreword: 

'This fourth annual Guide to Free Social Studies is completely revised. 
It is devoted exclusively to free social studies materials, and it uses 
the cross-media approach. 

"It lists, classifies and provides complete information on titles, sources, 
availability and contents of 1,271 films, 107 filmstrips, 34 sets of 
slides, 120 tapes, 29 scripts, 111 transcriptions, and 340 other ma- 
terials — a total of 2, 012 selected free items, . „" 

EDU C ATORS GUIDE TO FREE SCIENCE MATERIALS 1964. $7 25 Educators Progress 
Service, Randolph, Wisconsin, 

The publisher makes the following statements about the Fifth Edition: 

"It is a complete, up-to-date, annotated schedule of selected currently 
available free audiovisual media and other science curricular enrich- 
ment aids — bringing you the compiled information on these free educa- 
tional and informational materials, all at your finger tips, within the 
covers of a single book_ 

'This fifth edition lists, classifies and provides complete information 
on titles, sources, availability and contents of 875 free films, 103 
free filmstrips and 285 other free supplementary materials from 377 
sources. , . a total of 1,263 free items, of which 354 are new in this 
edition, , . " 

; AIDS, October 1964 -6- 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION /COLLEGE OF EDUCATION / UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Graduate assistants for 1964-65 . The following persons have been employed as graduate 
assistants in the Agricultural Education Division for 1964-65. 



Name 

1. Robert Daniels 

2. Norman Ehresman 

3 . Keith Fiscus 

4. Byron Gregg 

5. Martin McMillion 

6. Norman Wetzel 



Home State 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Kansas 

Illinois 

West Virginia 

Pennsylvania 



LJP 



Roy Dillon, to Kentucky . Roy Dillon, who has been a graduate assistant in agricultural 
education and a candidate for a doctor's degree for the past two years, has been employed 
as the head of the agriculture department at Morehead State College, Morehead, Kentucky. 
Congratulations, Roy. T Tp 

Robert V. Jurgens to Joliet. Mr. Jurgens, who has been teaching vocational agriculture at 
Serena, Illinois, was employed to teach the agriculture courses in the two-year, post-high 
school agriculture supply curx'iculum, Joliet Junior College. The Joliet Agriculture Depart- 
ment now has three staff members and additional staff will be added as needed. The agricul- 
ture supply curriculum is starting with 48 enrollees. Joliet is to be congratulated for their 
1 outstanding performance in this pioneering effort. Max Kuster, head of the Agriculture De- 
partment at Joliet, has been exceptionally effective in launching this new program, 

UP 

Paul E, Hemp, placement representative for agricultural education , Dr. Hemp will be 

handling placement in agricultural education for 1964-65. He will work with the Teacher 
i Placement Office as a consultant to facilitate the effective and efficient placement of teachers 
; of agriculture. The Office of Teacher Placement, 140 College of Education Building, will be 

responsible for distributing credentials and handling 'paper work" relating to placement. 

Teachers wishing assistance with placement for next year should activate their credentials 
; by January, 1965. T TT -. 



AIDS, October 1964 



Votec E370. Agricultural Education for First-Year Teachers . Beginning teachers, returning 
teachers, and all teachers who are teaching in Illinois for the first time may still enroll in 
this course. To date, 41 teachers are tentatively enrolled. Meetings for small groups of 
enrolled teachers will be held at Brownstown, Waverly, Norris City, Tamaroa, Armstrong, 
Piano, Orion, El Paso and Astoria. Further information about this graduate course may be 
obtained by contacting your supervisor or by writing to either Dr. Warmbrod or Dr. Fuller, 
347 College of Education Building. T p 

Placement report . As of September 11, 1964, all vocational agriculture vacancies had been 
filled. To fill job vacancies in Illinois, 57 persons who had not taught vocational agriculture 
in Illinois during the 1963-64 school year were employed. Of these 57 teachers, 13 came from 
outside Illinois, and nine men returned to teaching from other work. These and other facts 
about vocational agriculture placements are included in the following summary: 

Annual Placement Summary 

September 1, 1963 - September 1, 1964 

Total number of placements (including multiple placements) 91 

Number of inexperienced and out-of-state teachers placed 49 

Number of experienced teachers placed 46 

Number of out-of-state teachers placed 13 

Number of teachers returning to teaching from other work 9 

Number of returning servicemen placed 1 

Number of teachers qualified at the University of Illinois 21 

A. Placed as teachers 16 

B. Graduate school 3 

C. Military Service 

D. Other work 2 

Beginning teachers entering teaching from graduate school 4 

Number of teachers placed who were teaching in Illinois as 

of September 1, 1963 34 

Number of teachers placed who were not teaching in Illinois 

as of September 1, 1963 57 

Schools without approved teachers of vocational agriculture 

at the time of this report 2 

PEH 



AIDS, October 1964 



Votec 275 Summer Experience in Agricultural Education . The 1964-65 student teachers have 
completed their summer experience program. As usual, the university supervisor visited 
each student twice during the duration of the course. A list of students and the student teach- 
ing center at which they obtained their experience follows: 

Student Center Cooperating Teacher 



Ken Macke 
Art Englebrecht 
Vernon Watt 
J. D. Harrold 
Ulin Andrews 
Dan Bock 
Richard Wagner 
Larry Hippen 
Larry Spengler 
Robert Cottingham 
Charles Higgins 
Archie Devore 
William Schreck 
Lynn Liable 
Joe Hampton 
Dennis Hackett 
Max Muirheid 



Charleston 

Central (Clifton) 

Herscher 

Lincolnwood (Raymond) 

Mattoon 

Woodstock 

Woodstock 

Henry 

Henry 

Joliet 

Lawrenceville 

Lawrenceville 

Mahomet 

Minonk 

Sullivan 

Sullivan 

Sycamore 



J. W. Berger 
M. L. Boudreau 
Eldon Chapman 
Wm. Doerr 
James Leming 
George Forgey 
George Forgey 
Virgil Foster 
Virgil Foster 
Max Kuster 
Jesse Keyser 
Jesse Keyser 
Kenneth Knell 
Wm. Martini e 
Bill Rich 
Bill Rich 
Robert Howey 



GRF 



AIDS, October 1964 




ikVAT 



NEWS 



ILLINOIS ASSN. OF VO-AG TEACHERS 



There's something sort of pathetic about a horsefly sitting on the radiator of a tractor- 
don't let your IAVAT go the way of the horse because you didn't become a member. As of Sep- 
tember 1st, a majority of the sections are guarding against this with 100% memberships . They 
are: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 9, 11, 12, 14, 16, 17, 19, 2.0, 21, 24, & 25. In addition the VAS, State 
Office, U. of I. , SIU, and ISU are all 100%. Congratulations'. 



****#**;(;;(;* 






f 1964-65 






Receipts 






Dues & subscriptions 


$8 


,415.00 


IVA Refund (1964) 




120.00 


State Judging Contest 




533.00 


Expenses 






Conventions & Conferences 




800.00 


AVA Dues 


4 


,700.00 


IVA Dues 




188,00 


NVATA Dues 


1 


,400,00 


Ag. Ed, Magazine subscriptions 




660.00 


Awards & Banquets 




150.00 


Judging Contest, etc. 




450.00 


Postage, Stationery, Phone, etc. 




300.00 


Memorials, Flowers, etc. 




50 00 


IAVAT Committee reports, VAS 




225.00 


Miscellaneous 




50.00 


Secretary salary 




175.00 



THE ROLE OF IAVAT 

The role played by IAVAT depends upon the personalities and capabilities of its 
individual members and the ability of each to work not only as a single, cohesive unit, but 
also as an active member of the much larger and more powerful vocational family. With 
a new school year launched, it becomes necessary for IAVAT to evaluate past performances 
and consider steps that must be taken to insure success in the future. 

To quote Dr, A. W\ Nolan: 'Every man, and every association of men has a history, 
worthy or unworthy of interest, Why an organization of teachers of agriculture? There 
could be good work carried on by the teachers of agriculture without an organization, but 
through group association, important values are conserved and advanced. 

AIDS, October 1964 



There could be good farmers without the Farm Bureau, Grange, etc. , good education 
without schools, good christians without churches; but all these agencies conserve and promote 
the ideals which they hold. The purpose of this organization is to foster a more democratic 
control of the policies and programs of the teachers of vocational agriculture throughout the 
State". 

Through the years IAVAT members have contributed much time, interest, and effort 
to activities tantamount to vocational agriculture as we know it today „ The organization de- 
veloped out of a felt need, then as now, to 'bring teachers more closely together whereby the 
cause of vocational agriculture could be more strongly fostered — and to provide a more log- 
ical relationship between agriculture teachers and the State Board for Vocational Education". 
It has been said that no important ruling has ever been issued by the State Supervisory Staff 
that has not been discussed with and approved by the executive committee. No doubt, this 
one fact is largely responsible for the fine relationship that has always existed between the 
teachers of Illinois and the State Supervisory Staff. 

Your IAVAT has and will always work toward better relationships with other groups 
and individuals. The IAVAT urged the University of Illinois to organize a four week graduate 
course for vocational agriculture instructors, The IAVAT has worked closely with the College 
of Agriculture in its many activities of value to our work in the state judging contests, the 
summer conference, the short courses, extramural courses in agriculture, and the many 
teaching aids developed by the College through Vocational Agriculture Service. In addition, 
the IAVAT has assisted the College of Education in making available consultants, the special 
four weeks course for vocational agriculture teachers, the extramural courses, and the 
special course for beginning teachers. It has assisted the Illinois Agricultural Association 
in its entertainment of the officers of the association and in presenting awards to men who 
have taught for twenty -five years. 

Furthermore, the IAVAT has helped the FFA and FFA Foundation in their establish- 
ment, growth, and refinement through the years and with Vo-Ag Service in studying all new 
college publications and making recommendations for their use by vocational agriculture de- 
partments in the state as well as the present successful program of filmstrips and slides. A 
committee worked long and diligently to investigate project record books, The record books 
currently used by teachers today incorporate suggestions growing out of their studies. And 
don't forget the effort that was expended by the IAVAT to maintain our state appropriations 
for vocational work in Illinois, These are but a few of the many accomplishments of your 
IAVAT It is impossible to cite all of them. 

Learn to utilize your experiences, the joys and the failures, in a course of develop- 
ment. Make them serve as stepping stones in a constant personal growth, Cherish your 
INDIVIDUALITY but remember, you, as yourself, standing up with the other "YOU'S"make 
up the IAVAT , We need YOU . 

We a re depending on you . During the year many of you will have ideas or suggestions that 
you feel should be considered by your association or executive committee. The next execu- 
, five committee meeting will be held at the time of the IVA convention in Peoria, February 
27 Your District Directors are- District I, Clifford Sichta, Lanark; District II, Leroy 
Lawrence, Lockport; District III, Frank Young, Washington; District IV. Charles Schettler, 
[Wapella; District V, John Baker, Bridgeport; Vice-President, M, J, Nicol, Maroa; and 
| Bill Martinie, Minonk. Past President, We are all interested in hearing your ideas or 
suggestions, 



AIDS, October 1964 -2- 



Roasting ears and grilled hamburgers were enjoyed by all the Ag teachers of Section 

XI at the all day Farm Finance course held at Colchester, July 22. The cost came to less than 

$1.00 for all you could consume. Thanks to Burdette Graham and John Garrison for planning 

the feast. ,. 7 ,,. 

M. L. Mixer 

Public Relations Officer 

Section XI 

Section VI fall meeting for Vo-Ag Teachers was held at Belvidere Park with 100% of 

the schools attending. Even our two retiring teachers, Merle Roberts and Carl Lewis attended. 

Excellent barbeque chicken was served by the North Boone Chapter. A date, time, and place 

was set for the years activities. _, _ _ 

J R„ E. Brown 

Public Relations Officer 

Section VI 

Have you ordered subscriptions to the NATIONAL FUTURE FARMER magazine for 
your FFA members ? 

Thanks to VAS and the State Supervisory Staff for the many hours spent in setting up 
and conducting the State Meat and Milk Judging Contest . 

A good suggestion for the use of AG ED MAGAZINE is that after you have read each 
issue, pass it on to your principal and superintendent to read. 

Now is a good time to write an article for a magazine that would qualify you for the 
"30-Minute Club". 

We tried to be helpful with the tear sheet for ordering the AG ED MAGAZINE, how- 
ever, we were neglectful in informing you that $3*00 must accompany your order, 

Interstate Printers & Publishers 
19-27 N. Jackson Street 
Danville, Illinois 

Please send the Agricultural Education Magazine to: 
Name 



Address 
Bill to: 



ADDS, October 1964 



AGR. DIVISION TENTATIVE PROGRAM - AVA CONVENTION 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 
December 5-10, 1964 



Saturday, December 5 

10:00 - 11:30 A.M. 
1:00 - 2:15 P.M. 
2:30 - 5:00 P.M. 
6:00 - 9:30 P.M. 

Sunday, December 6 

8:00 - 9:30 A.M. 

1:00 - 2:30 P.M. 
2:45 - 4:15 P.M. 
4:30 - 6:00 P.M. 



Monday, December 7 



8:00 
9:00 
10:00 
1:30 
4:00 
6:00 



- Noon 

- Noon 

- Noon 

- 3:45 P. 

- 5:30 P. 



M. 
M. 



7:30 P.M. 



8:00 P.M. 

Tuesday, December 8 

7:00 - 8:30 A.M. 



9:00 - 10:00 A 


M 


10:00 - Noon 




1:30 - 4:30 P, 


M 


4:30 - 5:30 P 


M 


6:00 P.M. 




8:00 P.M. 





Wednesday, December 9 
7:30 - 11:30 A.M. 
7:30 - 11:30 A.M. 
7:30 - 9:30 A.M. 

9:45 - Noon 
12:00 - 1:30 P.M. 

2:00 - 4:00 P.M. 
6:00 P.M. 

Thursday, December 10 
8:30 - 11:30 A.M 

1:30 - 3:00 P,M, 

3:00 - 5:00 P.M. 
7:30 P.M. 

AIDS, October 1964 



NVATA First General Session 
NVATA Special Program 
NVATA First Regional Meetings 
NVATA State President's Dinner 
Sponsored by Swift & Company 

NVATA Breakfast - Combined Ag Groups 

and wives. 
NVATA Second General Session 
NVATA Group Meetings (6) 
Reception - Combined Ag Groups & Wives 
Sponsored by Minnesota, N. Dakota & 
S. Dakota Assoc. 

Ag Division Committee Meetings 

Ag Ed Executive Committee Meeting 

NVATA Second Regional Meetings 

Combined Agricultural Groups 

Ag Executive Council Meeting 

NVATA Past Officers Meeting & Dinner 

First AVA General Session 

Breakfast - Combined Ag Educ. Groups & 

Wives 1 — Sponsored by Minn. Assoc, of Fra. Co -Ops 

Business Meeting - Combined Ag Groups 

Combined Ag Groups 

Combined Ag Groups Visit Exhibits 

Meeting of Editing -Managing Bd„ ,Ag Ed Mag. 

Dinner - Editing -Managing Board 

AVA Second General Session 

State Supervisors Breakfast 
Teachers Educators Breakfast 
NVATA Awards Breakfast - Members & 
Wives - Sponsored by Allis -Chalmers 
NVATA Final General Session 
International Harvester Luncheon 
Combined Ag Ed Groups & Wives 
Combined Agricultural Groups 
AVA Banquet 

Combined Agricultural Groups — Joint 
meeting with Guidance Section 
Combined Ag Groups - Convention 
Summary and Final Business Session 
AVA House of Delegates 
AVA Ships Program 

-4- 



Meet versatile Charles L. "Charley" Schettler, Director of District IV. He was 
born and raised on 160 acres in Franklin County near Sesser, Illinois. He graduated from 
Southern Illinois University in 1940 and had his first job as teacher and principal of a three 
room grade school in Mulkeytown, where he taught the 7th and 8th grades and 'done the 
spankin' for the other six. This job terminated at the end of that school year because of no 
tenure and one of the director's sons needed a job. His next job was principal and 8th grade 
teacher at Steeleville, Illinois from whence the Army snatched him for a 5| year hitch in 
1942. Most of this time was spent with the famed Japanese -American 442nd Combat Team. 
Upon his return from overseas duty, Schettler returned to school at the University of Illi- 
nois and obtained his Master's Degree of Science in Vocational Agriculture. In June of '47 
he "hired out" as the Vo-Ag teacher in the Wapella Community Unit District and has had con- 
tinuous tenure there ever since. 

Charley has Adult and Young Farmer classes in addition to his all -day classes and 
the FFA. He has had one American farmer and 29 state farmers; 50 sectional, 10 district 
and 2 state FFA foundation winners; 4 sectional and 1 district Star farmer, and 6 sectional 
Vice-presidents. He has been the Secretary and President of the Wapella Business and 
Professional Men's Club, President of the local and county teacher's associations, President 
and Vice-president of the Wapella Community Club, a committee member of the Wapella Corn 
Bread and Bean Festival since its inception 10 years ago. He is in Ms 17th year as a 4-H 
Club leader of 56 members, he is a member of the Session of the United Presbyterian Church 
of Clinton, Illinois and was its Clerk for 6 years. And he also teaches a class for Reserve 
Army Officers on the Command and General Staff level one night each week. 

Schettler is entitled to wear the silver star for gallantry in action, Combat Infantry 
and glider badges, unit citation with oakleaf cluster and European theater Ribbon with 5 Major 
battle stars and an invasion arrowhead. Charley now holds the rank of Lt. Colonel in the U.S. 
Army Reserves and has graduated from the Command and General Staff College at Fort 
Leavenworth, the Senior Tactical Command and Staff College of the Army. 

Mr, and Mrs. Schettler, "Charley and Marge", live in a three bedroom ranch type 
"Lu-Re-Co" home, "built by the farmers of the Wapella area". Mrs. Schettler, an ardent 
church worker, is in her 15th year as a girl's 4-H leader, is secretary of the Wapella Com- 
munity Club, is President of her church circle, and teaches a Sunday School class. Chuck, 
the eldest son, is a junior at the University of Illinois, majoring in Ag Mechinization. Tom, 
their second child, is a Sophomore at Wapella and is taking Agriculture under "pop", Nancy 
Sue is a typical High School Freshman who hasn't made up her mind what she wants to do» 
Hats off to Charley Schettler, Director of District IV. 



AIDS, October 1964 -5- 



PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICERS 


1964-65 


Section 


Name 


Address 


1 


Warren Schmidt 


Oregon 


2 


Arthur Schick 


Sterling 


3 


Marvin Damron 


Kewanee 


4 


Tom Knox 


Alexis 


5 


Tom Fitzsimmons 


Brimfield 


6 


Robert Brown 


DeKalb 


7 


Ken Anderson 


Ottawa 


8 


Marion Welles 


Yorkville 


9 


C. J. Kuster 


Normal 


10 


Donald Whitten 


Cissna Park 


11 


Mervin Mixer 


Nauvoo 


12 


Paul Cranfill 


Tremont 


13 


Shaw Terwilliger 


Virginia 


14 


Lee D. West 


Mt. Pulaski 


15 


Victor Funk 


Franklin 


16 


Donald Bateman 


LeRoy 


17 


Clark Esarey 


Philo 


18 


John Smith 


Georgetown 


19 


William Doerr 


Raymond 


20 


Carl Chapman 


Oblong 


21 


Gerald Binkley 


Kinmundy 


22 


Richard Petrowich 


New Athens 


23 


Grover Burkett 


Louisville 


24 


Ardell Kimmell 


Campbell Hill 


25 


William J, Brinklev 


McLeansboro 






Send News to: E. L. Rice 

Princeville, 111. 



61559 



AIDS, October 1964 



-6- 



TO: Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61803 



Please send the following items: 



Price Total 
Number each* amount Item 

1.75 Com Production Subject -Matter Packets 



15. 00 Complete Set of Soil Samples of Known Test Value 

Individual Samples 



3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 



Sample 


J2*L 


Zl 


Test 


P 2 


J£ 


1 


6.9 


13 




115 


140 


2 


4.6 


6 




9 


145 


3 


5.9 


11 




53 


276 


4 


5.9 


22 




33 


220 


5 


6,0 


15 




24 


210 


6 


6.6 


17 




67 


300 



.05 1964 Student problem for use with 111. Farm Record Book 

.25 Teacher's key for Record Problem 

Free Revised Exercise 16, Electrical Controls Kit 

(For schools who ordered the exercises last year) 

*Price does not include postage. 

Name- School 

Address 

Billing 



NOTE: You may wish to detach this form and place it in your VAS ORDER FILE for 
future reference in case you do not use it now. 



AIDS, October 1964 



INDEX TO ITEMS IN VO-AG SECTION 

Page 

Agricultural Releases for 1964-65 • ♦ • • . • • 1 

Bulletins and Circulars . . . . 1 

Controls Kit Exercise Revised . 5 

County Scholarship Applications for 1965 3 

Electrical Controls Kit Program 1 

Farmstead and Farm Building Planning Aid . 1 

Financial Management Materials . 3 

Forest Tree Application Form 4 

Illinois Farm Record Books, Parts I and II 3 

In-Service Courses Scheduled 5 

Meat and Milk Judging Contest 3 

New Books .6 

1964 Problem for Use with the Illinois Farm Record Book, 3 

Persons in Charge of Electric Motors Kits 2 

Soil Samples of Known Test Value 5 

Subject -Matter Packets 4 

Swift and Company Slide Sets 4 

$300 College Scholarship 3 



AIDS, October 1964 



PRICE LET OF 



The feed prices for many of the feedstuff s used in vocational agnvJsz:. 
below. This list is meant to be osed as a basis of valne 
home. All feed actually purchased should, of course 

Kind of feed 
Corn, shelled, bu. 



_ 
i 



■n, ground shelled, bu. . 
Corn, ground ear, bu 

Oats , bu 

Oils . groun d, bo. 

Barley, (feed) bu. 

Barley, ground or rolled, b- 

_hum, grain, cwl 

.horn, grain, cracked, cwt. ... . 

5-:„~ is. : \ .:: -.' ■--:.-: : " IT. 

Whole milk, Grade B. cwl 

:-•-•-■ .'.''. 

Sorghum sillage, ton • • LM '.'-.'.<'. 

- 

- 
Preserved with 70-100 lb. mc: 

Pr 150-200 lb. ground co - M 

----- 
.-.'-'. :■-'.:- for bal 

.othy h^ L - ~ " 20.04 



1 -----;.--' . 



-- . t' .. . : .-,:::: . - ' . : . 



s 

ts. 12 -24 - 5. OS 

:l;rr - 12 

- ■ 5.01 

- - . 

-1 5.00-1: 



- 
- 



AIDS. Octc Der 



VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE SERVICE 

Unlv.nify of tlllnolt ■ Goll»o« of Agrkgltur* 

434 MUMFORD HALL • URBANA, ILLINOIS 



serial: sshl 

univ 0? ill library 



J^LL 



VO-AG AIDS 



. 



Volume 23 . Number 4 
November 1964 



bsu«d (olnrty by 

Vocational Agriculture Service, College of Agriculture 

end 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

in Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 



VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 

There's A New Challenge in Agriculture . A new supply of this publication on agricultural 
careers, published by the Land-Grant College Association, has been received. A single 
copy is being sent without chai'ge to each Vo-Ag department in Illinois from the office of 
Dean Gardner. Additional copies are available from Vocational Agriculture Service at 25£ 
each, plus postage. JWM 

Bulletins and Circulars . Only one new bulletin has been released since the last issue of the 
AIDS. It is Illinois Bulletin 702, Illinois Country Grain Elevator Financial Organization and 
Operation. Because of its technical nature and limited application to vocational agriculture, 
it was not included in the November issue of AGRICULTURAL RE LEASES . A single copy 
is available on request. TWM 

Simple Plumbing Repairs for the Home and Farmstead is the title of Farmers Bulletin 2202 
which was included in November RELEASES. Additional copies are available from the Supt. 
of Documents, U. S. Printing Office, Washington, D.C. at 10^ each. TWM 

Fitting and Showing Calves is a leaflet included in November RELEASES and is available, in 
quantity, without charge from Mr, Jerry Sotola, Public Relations, The Chicago Livestock 
Exchange, Chicago. j^^ 

Satisfaction Guaranteed . Do not hesitate to return or write about any materials obtained 
from Vocational Agriculture Service that are not up to your expectations. We will replace 
them or refund j^our purchase price. A few Rapid Raters and some timing lights have been 
returned and have been replaced without question. TWM 

Milk Judging Ribbons , A new supply of milk judging ribbons was received and distributed 
to schools on October 1< If you had ribbons coming and have not received them yet, please 
let us know because you should have received them before this. We will duplicate your 
shipment if necessary. whw 

1964 Revenue Act - Provisions of Significance to Farmers . Our attention has been called 
to an error in this item that was handed out at the summer intensive courses. The item 
"Crop Insurance Proceeds'' on page 7 did not become a part of the law and should not have 
been included in this publication. THH 

Financial Management Materials . These materials, which were ordered at the summer in- 
tensive courses and afterward, are being mailed out at present. Please let us know if you 
do not receive them shortly. THH 

Plans for Soil Shaker Block. Single copies of plans for making a soil shaker block were sent 
in the November RELEASES. A few additional copies are available for those who did not 
receive a copy or want an additional copy. „.„ 

AIDS, November 1964 -1- 



Club Calf Sale. The following information was furnished by Sherwood Jackson, Vocational 
Agriculture Teacher, Seneca High School: 

"Quality will reign supreme as owners of thirty Northern Illinois beef cattle 
herds consign their best 1964 steer and heifer calves to Seneca's Seventh 
Annual Club Calf Sale. The annual event is sponsored by the Seneca Future 
Farmers in cooperation with Northern Illinois beef cattlemen to provide 
Fancy quality steer and heifer calves for 4-H and FFA Projects. Ample 
selection is offered as 45 steers and 15 registered heifers of three breeds — 
Angus, Shorthorn, and Hereford, are sold at auction to the highest bidders. 

"The Sale will be held on Thursday night, November 19th at 7:00 pm, in the 
FFA Sale barn on Route 170 in Seneca, Illinois. 

"Calves from consigning beef herds have won in leading shows in Illinois, 
Indiana, and Wisconsin, in 1964. All calves sold will be eligible for Land 
O Lincoln classes at the 1965 Illinois State Fair with certificates furnished 
for each calf sold on sale night. Many calves arc sired by top sires of their 
breeds in Ulinois. All will be broke to tie and lead and will weigh from 400 to 
500 pounds by sale nighto 

"Since many of the hei'ds represented in this sale have been started as 4-H and 
FFA beef projects, sellers will offer their best to improve show quality of 
junior exhibitors in the midwest who are exhibiting feeding and breeding cattle 
at shows. 

"At the close of the Sale, show equipment donated by local merchants and sale 
consignors, will be given away to calf owners. 

"The sale committee for 1964 includes Frank Herriott of Seymour, Roy Kates 
of Grand Ridge, and Jay Kinney of Leland. 

"All calves will be ready for inspection in the Seneca FFA Salebarn after 5:00 
p.m., CST on Thursday Night, November 19, 1964. The sale will start 
promptly at 7 : 00 p . m. " WRW 

In-Service Courses Scheduled. The following courses have been requested and are tenta- 
tively scheduled. Teachers in the sections involved will be notified directly but in most 
cases there is room for a few additional teachers from nearby sections who may wish to 
attend. If you are from outside the section and wish to attend, please let us know as soon 
as possible. We will, in turn, notify the host school and include you in the course. 



Saturday, Nov. 7 
Tuesday, Nov. 17 
Saturday, Dec. 5 
Saturday, Jan. 9 



Spray Painting 
Electrical Controls 
Surveying 
Tractor Tune-Up 



Freeport, Section 1 9 a.m„ 
(Senior High School) 
Urbana, Section 17 4 p.m. 

(Vo-Ag Service Bldg.) 
Wapella, Section 16 9 a.m. 

{High School) 
Oakwood, Section 18 9 a.m. 

(High School) 



RFE 



AIDS, November 1964 



-2- 



Corn Subject-Matter Packets . All orders for corn production packets received to date have 
been filled. If you have not received your order, please advise. Additional packets are avail- 
able on request and may be ordered on the tear sheet included in this issue of the AIDS. 

Agronomy Facts - Volume IX. This consists of bound copies of Agronomy Facts issued by the 
Agronomy Department during the period of June 1, 1962 through June 30, 1964. Volume IX 
has just been released and is available at $1.00 per copy plus postage. It is included on the 
tear sheet for your convenience. Volume IX has been released ahead of Volume VHI which is 
not quite ready. It will be announced at a later date. rt n 

Ag -Science Demonstration No. 4. Single copies of "Checking and Calibrating Farm Sprayers" 
were sent in the November Ag. Releases. It is 4 pages in length. Quantity copies are avail- 
able for 3 cents plus postage. Use the tear sheet if you desire quantify copies. 

Soil Samples of Known Soil-Test Value. All orders i eceived for soil samples have been filled. 
Please advise if you have not received your order. Relerto October AIDS if you desire addi- 
tional samples* RLC 



NEW BOOKS 



The following have been added to our library since the last 
issue of the AIDS. All of our books are available for re- 
in our office by those interested. As long as the 
editions are current, they will be included in such exhibits 
as the one at the Annual Conference of Vocational Agriculture 
Teachers. 



EDUCATORS GUIDE TO FREE GUIDANCE MATERIALS 1964. 
Service, Randolph, Wisconsin. 



$6.50. Educators Progress 



The publisher makes the following statements about the Third Edition: 

"It is a complete, up-to-date, annotated schedule of selected currently 
available free audiovisual and other guidance aids — bringing you the 
compiled information on these free informational and educational ma- 
terials, all at your finger-tips, within the covers of a single book. 

"This third edition lists, classifies and provides complete information 
on titles, sources, availability and contents of 500 films, 69 film- 
strips, 43 tapes and transcriptions, and 237 other materials — bulletins, 
pamphlets, charts, posters, magazines and books — a total of 849 
selected free items of which 289 are new and starred (*)." 



AIDS, November 1964 



-3- 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION / COLLEGE OF EDUCATION / UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



New Advanced Certificate Candidates . In recent months the following teachers of vocational 
agriculture have been admitted at the University of Illinois to the Advanced Certificate Degree 
program: 



Harold Elliott 
John Fedderson 
Thomas Fitz Simmons 
Russell Lev 
Harold Lindley 
\\ iUiam Martinie 
Roland Meyer 
Robert Mills 
William Pietor 
Norbert Pohlman 
Gordon Sa 
Ronald Siebel 
John Sweenev 
Glen Willard 



Atlanta 

Milledgeville 

Brimfield 

Rantoul 

Hopedale 

Minonk 

Cissna Park 

Manteno 

Woodstock 

LaHarpe 

Peotone 

Dwight 

William sville 

Griggsville 



LJP 



Votec E477 Enrollment. The enrollment in Votec E477, Field Studies in Agricultural Educa- 
tion, is encouraging. Forty -seven persons are enrolled in the two sections of the course 
being offered by Dr, Krebs at Dwight and DeKalb. Several of the teachers enrolled have a 
master's degree and are working for the Advanced Certificate in Education, The most pop- 
ular topic for field studies is related to the implementation of the opportunities for vocational 
agriculture created by the Vocational Education Act of 1963. 

The following schedule will be followed in the offering of Votec E477 in future years: 

1965-66 District 3 Sections 11-16 Western niinois 

1966-67 District 4 Sections 17-20 East-Central Illinois 

1967-68 District 1 Sections 1-5 Northwestern Illinois 

1968-69 District 5 Sections 21-25 Southern Illinois 

Votec E477 may be used for either a master's degree or the Advanced Certificate in Education 
degree. Keep this course in mind when planning your program of courses. T Tp 

Placement Information . Teachers who up-date their credentials this year will find a set of 
new procedures being used by the Educational Placement Office, Candidates, for example, 
will be asked to type their own personal data sheets. Appropriate forms and instructions 
will be sent to those candidates who request that their credentials be activated. 

Space does not permit a more complete description of the new procedures to be initiated in 
the Educational Placement Office this year. Questions and requests for help should be 
directed to Professor Paul Hemp, Placement Consultant for Agricultural Education. -pyv 
AIDS, November 1964 



Sharp Increase in Freshman Class , Twenty -seven freshmen are enrolled in Agricultural 
Education at the University of Illinois for the fall semester, 1964-65„ This number repre- 
sents a sharp increase over the enrollment of past years,, The undergraduate enrollment 
in Agricultural Education rose to 100 for the fall semester, 1964-65 . This is an increase 
of 23% over last year's figure* 



Freshmen students, their home high schools, and the names of their vocational agricultural 
teachers are listed below: 

Name 



1. Bend, Stephen Douglass 

2. Buikema, Vernon 

3. Cravens, James R. 

4. Currie, Glenn 

5. Dow, Robert 
6„ Espe, Richard 

7. Greenwood, Larry 

8. Hayes, Gerald 

9. Helt, Philip Ray 
10, Hoff, Harlan 

11 Korth, Ronald Francis 

12. Miller, Harry Edward 

13. Monti, David 

14= Nolte, Thomas John 

15. O'Connor, Dennis Lee 

16. Peters, Mervin Gene 

17. Riskedal, Stephen Kenneth 

18. Schoney, Richard 

19. Smith, Roger E, 

20. Smith, Russell 

21. Taylor, Richard 



22. Thomas. Larry Clinton 

23. Unger, Charles Byron 

24. Wise, Dale A, 

25. Anderson, George 

26. Compton, Alan 

27. Roth, Gary 



High School 


Agr. Teacher 


Shabbona 


Porter Martin 


Thomson 


Wm. Gengenbach 


Tri-City H.S. 


Henry Gartner 


Buffalo 




Paxton 


Robert Rohlfing 


Flora 


G_ S, Zimmerman 


Shabbona 


Porter Martin 


Mulberry Grove 


Russell Weger 


Hillsboro 


Ed Voils 


Martinsville 


John Beaty 


Thomson 


Wm = Gengenbach 


Shabbona 


Porter Martin 


Raymond and 


Wm. Doerr and 


Hillsboro 


Carroll Turner 


Carlinville 


Stanley Klaus and 




Gary Ellis 


Brussels 


G. F. Brock 


Tolono 


J. Clark Esarey 


Paxton 


Robert Rohlfing 


Leland 


Wm. McMurtry 


Lena-Win slow 


Wm, Holak and 




Carl Miller 


Findlay 


Jerry Kuykendall 


Benton 


Bernard Finley 


Catlin 


Charles Lane, 




John Boyer, and 




Russell Holstine 


Leaf River 


Wilbert Asbury 


Raymond 


William Doerr 


Macon 


Luther Wells 


Shabbona 


Porter Martin 


Shelbyville 


Kenneth Diehl 


Roanoke-Benson 


Eldon Witt 



PEH 



First Year Teacher's Course , A total of forty -two teachers have enrolled in the first-year 
teacher's course (Votec E370). The course has been divided into two sections with Dr. 
Warmbrod and Di% Fuller each teaching one section. 



Meeting Center Teacher 

Dr. Warmbrod is working with the following men: 



Norris City 



ADDS, November 1964 



-2- 



Roger Johnson 
Robert Wheeler 
Ray Reece 
Dale Liston 



High School 



Enfield 
Norris City 
Eldorado 
Shawneetown 



Meeting Center 
Tamaroa 



Brownstown 



Waverly 



Dr. Fviller is working with: 



Astoria 



Orion 



El Paso 



Armstrong 



Piano 



Teacher 


High School 


William Beldon 


Red Bud 


Richard Sutton 


Tamaroa 


Donald Murray 


Woodlawn 


Gerald C rouse 


Bluford 


Donald Hobbs 


Marissa 


Frank Smola 


Waltonville 


Carroll Turner 


Hillsboro 


Alvah Kelley 


Ramsey 


William Cole 


Brownstown 


Roy Rogers 


Sandoval 


Russell Higgins 


Dieterich 


William Murray 


Newton 


Gene Scanlan 


Milton 


Alvin Brock 


Ashland 


Gerald Raistrick 


Palmyra 


Paul Ames 


Waverly 


Gerald Weiss 


Augusta 


Robert Lowe 


Astoria 


R. Tom Hainline 


Lewistown 


Don Kunz 


Havana 


Norman McClure 


Warren (Monmouth) 


Wayne Sampson 


Annawan 


Earl Gudeman 


Manlius 


Jim Vetter 


Orion 


Donald Jenkins 


El Paso 


Marvin Lay 


Minier 


Eugene Rench 


Lexington 


Lyle Cox 


Chatsworth 


Robert Dickeson 


Lostant 


Robert Kinney 


Bellflower 


Darrell Thompson 


Rankin 


George Kreider 


Wellington 


Ralph Peverly 


Chrisman 


Robert Lease 


Mansfield 


Larry Kimble 


Newark 


Raymond Lett 


Sandwich 


Richard Rehn 


Piano 


Gerald Nolte 


Huntley 



GRF 



AIDS, November 1964 



-3- 




ilAVAT 



NEWS 



ILLINOIS ASSN. OF VO-AG TEACHERS 



DUES REBATE 

The members of your Executive Committee who will attend the NVATA & AVA con- 
vention in Minneapolis will have some decisions to make since there are several resolutions 
that will probably be submitted. If I can adequately summarize some of them for you, you 
may want to express your opinion to your representatives before the convention. 

At the Atlantic City convention of AVA last year, a dues increase of $5.00 was 
voted. Also a rebate plan was attached to this So. 00 increase, whereby the AVA would 
rebate $3.00 for affiliate state associations having 100% of its potential membership. 

hi May of 1964, the AVA AG DIVISION committee met and suggested the following 
plan for distributing the AVA dues rebate: 



Group 


% of Rebate 


State Ag Teacher Assoc. 


50 


NVATA 


45 


Ag Ed Division 


3 


NASAE 


1 


A ATE A 


1 



(The last two represent Supervisors and Teacher Trainers) 

The Minnesota Vocational Agriculture Instructors Association adopted the following 
resolution: 

BE IT HEREBY RESOLVED that the MVAIA, Inc. recommend to the 
Executive Committee of NVATA that the full rebate be returned to each 
affiliate state organization in proportion to its state potential, and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the NVATA, if it feels that additional 
monies are needed to promote the activities of the organization, initiate 
a dues increase rather than use any portion of this rebate for the purpose 
of increasing its dues. 

Region III of NVATA, meeting in Ames, passed the following resolutions: 

Resolved that Region IH oppose the Executive Committee of the Ag Section 
of AVA recommendation of the AVA dues rebate. Resolved that the AVA 
clues rebate be returned to the state affiliate organization which paid them 
according to the AVA rebate plan. 

AIDS, November 1964 



Recommend that the AVA Executive Board set the dues at $7, ,50 per member 
without the rebate plan,. 

And finally. The Wisconsin Vocational Association will sponsor a resolution to 
rescind the resolution adopted at Atlantic City, relating to the distribution of rebates for 
the years succeeding the current membership year and that the AVA House of Delegates 
assembled at Minneapolis amend the AVA By-Laws to set affiliated membership dues at 
$8.00, 

ADVICE FROM A STUDENT TO A TEACHER— Deny yourself absolutely the privilege of 
sarcasm, nasty irony, ridicule, and humiliation. Don't force anyone to expose his 
weaknesses publicly 

Will Attend IAA Annual Meeti ng 

Your president has been invited to represent the IAVAT at the 50th Annual Meeting 
of the Illinois Agricultural Association to lie held in the Sherman House, Chicago Illinois 
on November 18-19, I have accepted the invitation, 

A PRAYER FOR TEACHERS 

O Lord of all Learners and all Teachers: 

Help us to reexamine our loyalties by the light of thy teaching and to 
square them with eternal truth 

Help us to dedicate ourselves anew to the children; for of such is the 
kingdom of heaven 

Help us to dedicate outselves anew to the free public school; for it is 
the bulwark of our personal rights, our political liberties, 
and our representative institutions,. 

Help us to dedicate ourselves anew to our chosen goal of a united 
profession of teachers; for in it we shall find our larger 
selfhood. 

Help us to dedicate ourselves anew to the democratic ideals of our 
country; for it is the last best hope of earth, 

Help us to dedicate ourselves anew to the universal brotherhood of 
humanity; for we are all members one of another 

Grant, O Lord, that we may hold high the torch of truth, goodness, 

and beauty, that we may be worthy the high office of teacher. 

For thine is the kingdom and the power and glory forever. 

Joy Elmer Morgan 

Reminder 

If you have not paid your dues — now is the time, I'm sure your sectional chair- 
man will accept them and welcome you into our fraternity. As of October 20, 1964, we have 
less than half of our sections with 100% of their teachers as members of the Association, 
Surely we can do better than this. The following sections are 100%: 1, 3, ; 5, 9, 11, 12, 14 , 
17, 19, 20, 22 ; and 23, ****** 

AIDS, November 1964 -2- 



Section 2 

In our daily hustle, bustle, and hurry on the job, we seldom stop and take a good 
look at some of the people in our area who are constantly working for Vocational Agriculture 
and the FFA. In the Sterling -Rock Falls Community we have Mr. R» M. Robinson who is 
presently serving as District I Director of the Illinois FFA Foundation, 

In addition to capably getting more donors and contributors to the Foundation, he 
has also found time to speak to the Chapter Officers at the Section II Leadership Training 
School and to the Whiteside County 4-H Federation. He has made financial contributions to 
the FFA Foundation and to the Whiteside County 4-H Federation as well as the Sterling and 
Rock Falls Chapters. 

Presently Mr. Robinson is serving as a member of the Agriculture Advisory Council 
of Sterling Township High School. He is a busy business man that owns and operates the 
DcKalb Molasses Feed Company at DeKalb. Illinois and the Second DeKalb Molasses Feed 
Company at Rock Falls, Illinois. 

I am sure that there are men in many communities of Illinois that deserve our 
recognition and thanks for a job well done. Take a good look around you and find out who 
your real boosters are and take the time to thank them for their interest and support. 

Section 2 Vocational Agriculture Teachers held their Fall meeting at Dixon, Illinois 
on September 3, 1964. The Leadership Training School for FFA Officers of Section 2 was 
held at Erie High School on October 1, 1964. The Section 2 Land Use Selection Contest was 
held at Lanark, Illinois on October 6, 1964. Fifteen schools participated in the contest. 
Sterling placed first, Lanark second, and Shannon and Thomson tied for third. 

A. L. Schick, Section 2 
Public Relations Officer 

I realize many times a day how much I owe to others and how I must exert myself 
to give in return for all that I have received. 

Albert Einstein 

Section 12 

The following officers were elected at the State Conference in June by the 
Section 12 Agriculture Teachers: 

Fred Bergman - Section Chairman 

Bob Albers - Section Secretary 

Paul Cranfill - Public Relations Officer 

The Section 12 Agriculture Teachers met at Pekin for our summer meeting on 
August 24, 1964. Dr. Herbst was with us from the University and explained to us some of 
the new materials which were available from Vo-Ag Service. Harold Engelking, State 
Supervisor, also spoke to us proposing some new challenges for the coming year in Voc. 
Agr. 

The Section 12 Ag Teachers met at Canton in the Library on July 22 for a Farm 
Management Workshop with Don Miller as instructor. This was a most interesting work- 
shop on financial management. 

AIDS, November 1964 -3- 



The Section 12 Leadership Training School met at Fair- .... g 

Sept 24. Representatives from all 23 chapters in the section enjoyed format; 

discussion groups for each FFA Officer and for each section of the Program o: 
bountiful family style ham dinner was enjoyed by all at the Reforms 
king and Bob JeckeL State FFA Sec.-Treas. both addressed 

The Section 12 Land Use Selection Contest was held at Fannin. 
Twenty one schools participated. The contest winner was t m. 

The Section 12 Grain Show and Crop Judging Contest will be held at - - 
November 21. 1964, 

Pau: - 

Lie Relations Officer 



AIDS. November 1964 



ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICUtTtJI 

NOIMAl, HllNOIt 617*1 




AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



Publication Completed on Tools and Equipment Used to Make Repairs on the Farm in Central Illi- 
nois. A publication has recently been completed by Dr. Orville L. Young, Department of Agri- 
culture, Illinois State University at Normal concerning the hand tools and power equipment used 
to make repairs on farms and the frequency of ownership of each. The publication, Tools and 
Equipment Used to Make Repairs on the Farms in Central Illinois , included a study of 250 farms. 
Copies are being sent to teachers of vocational agriculture. 

Teacher Placement Report . Two men will qualify for vocational agriculture teaching at Illinois 
State University on November 13. These men are presently doing their,student teaching in voca- 
tional agriculture at Flanagan High School. Names of the student teachers and other data regard- 
ing their vocational agriculture background are as follows: 



Name 
William Decker 
Laverne Malone 



High School 
Attended 
Strawn 
Maroa-Forsyth 



Years of 
Vo-Ag 

4 

4 



High School 
Vo-Ag Teacher 
Patrick Gallivan 
Melvin Nicol 



Student Teachers for First Semester . Thirteen men are enrolled in Methods and Procedures in 
Agricultural Education for the first semester and will begin their student teaching on November 
16. Those completing requirements and available for teaching positions at the completion of 
student teaching are also indicated. 

High School 
Vo-Ag Teacher 
Myron Langhorst 
Alan Thompson 
Everett Rieck 
John Roth 
Bernard Goetze 
Clarence Kuster 
Charles Crowley 
Robert Littlefield 
John Sweeney 
Warren Schmidt 
Stanley Magnuson 
Wilbur Hancock 
Ernest Sancken 
John Olson 
Warren K. Wessels 
Joseph McGann 

♦State^armer KE j 

♦♦Available for teaching positions as of January 29, 1964 
tAmerican Farmer 

AIDS, November 1964 



Name 
John Blessent 
Ray Brownfield 


Teaching 
C< titer 
Kirkland 
Williamsfield 


Home 
High School 
Reddick 
Roberts -Thawville 


Years of 
Vo-Ag 
4 

4 


Steve Bruce 
Jerry Crump 
Lee Dueringer 
Harley Hicks 
Daniel Leathers 

♦♦Roger Macauley 

♦♦Jack Niles 


William sfield 

Streator 

Maroa 

Princevilie 

Wapella 

Streator 

Washington 


Bluffs 

Normal 

Gibson City 

ABL High School 

Williamsville 

Oregon 

Somonauk 


4 

4 
4* 

4 

3 

4* 

4* 


♦♦Edward Stokes 
♦♦Lloyd Taylor 
♦♦James Winslow 
Darel Zook 


Kirkland 
Princevilie 
Eureka 
Wapella 


El Paso 
Kirkland 
Fairbury 
Danvers 


4t 

4 
4 
4 



(tear sheet) 



TO: Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61803 

Please send the following items: 



Number 



Price 
each* 

1.75 

1.00 

,03 



Total 
Amount 



Item 

Corn Production Subject -Matter Packets 

Agronomy Facts, Volume IX 

Ag. Science Demonstration No. 4, Checking 
and Calibrating Farm Sprayers 



*Prices do not include postage. 



Name 



Address 



Billing^ 



School 



NOTE ; You may wish to detach and place this form in your VAS ORDER FILE for future 
reference in case you do not use it now. 



AIDS, November 1964 



INDEX TO ITEMS FN VO-AG SERVICE SECTION 

Page 

Ag -Science Demonstration No. 4- ............................ . 3 

Agronomy Facts - Volume DC 3 

Bulletins and Circulars .......... ................ ........ 1 

Corn Subject-Matter Packets - . . ....................... 3 

Financial Management Materials ............................. 1 

Fitting and Showing Calves ............. 1 

In-Service Courses Scheduled .......... 2 

Milk Judging Ribbons 1 

1964 Revenue Act - Provisions of Significance to Farmers 1 

Plans for Soil Shaker Block .............................. . 1 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 1 

Simple Plumbing Repairs for the Home and Farmstead ................ 1 

Soil Samples of Known Soil-Test Value .......... .............. . 3 

There's a New Challenge in Agriculture ........................ 1 



AIDS, November 1964 



PRICE LIST OF FEEDS^ 
October 21, 1964 

The feed prices for many of the feedstuffs used in vocational agriculture projects are listed 
below. This list is meant to lie used as a basis of values for all boys obtaining their feed at 
home. All feed actually purchased should, of course, be recorded at prices paid. 

Kind of feed October 21 

Corn, shelled, bu. 1.10 

Corn, ground shelled, bu. 1.20 

Com, ground ear, bu 1.20 

Oats, bu 60 

Oats, ground, bu 70 

Barley, (feed) bu 1.06 

Barley, ground or rolled, bu 1.16 

Sorghum, grain, cut 2.08 

Sorghum, grain, cracked, cut 2.18 

Garbage and kitchen waste, ton 5.50 

Skim and buttermilk, cwt 1.50 

Whole milk, Grade B. cwt 3.00 

Corn silage, ton 10.00 

Sorghum sillage, ton 9.00 

Grass silage, ton 

preservative added 5.00 

Preserved wim 70-100 lb. molasses 9.00 

Preserved with - lb. ground corn . 10,00 

Clover and mixed hay) All hay prices are 22.00 

Alfalfa • baled hay and straws ...... 25.00 

Timothy hs ) Loose less per ton . . ........... 22.00 

Oat straw or wheat straw ....... .... 15.00 



— Prepared by Albert, Dept . : .ence. University of Illinois. Urbana, mi- 



AIDS. November 1 



VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE SERVICE 

Ufllvwlfy of Illinois ■ Call*** of Agrtorftvr* 

434 MUMFORD HALL • URBANA, ILLINOIS 



SERIALS DE S3HL 

- ILL l: 






VO-AG AIDS 



Volume 23, Number 5 
December 1964 



Unwd Jointly by 
Vocational Agriculture Service, College of Agriculture 

and 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

in Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 






VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 



New Subject -Matter Units . Quantity copies of 9 new or revised subject-matter units have 
been sent to those schools having advance orders The units sent were as follows: 

Unit No Title No. of Pages 



1008a Making the Butterfat Test 8 

1037 Caring for the Sow and Litter at Farrowing Time 8 

2002a Inventory Your Resources for Farm Planning 12 

2003a Planning for Sound Land-Use 12 

2005a Developing the Land-Use Plan and Field Layout 8 

2038 Capitalism, Socialism, and Communism 12 

4010a Planning a Fertilizer Program 8 

:3a Producing Oats 12 

4047 Controlling Insects of Vegetable Crops 20 

A single copy of each was also included in each shipment of the December Agricultural 
Releases. Those wishing to order additional copies of any of these units may use the 
tear sheet accompanying this issue of the AIDS, 

o remaining units of the 1964-65 series are: 

10a The Soil Fertility Program — Economic Considerations, 

Build-Up and Removal 12 

3017 Farm Building Appraisal 24 

se units will be sent out in the near future and will be announced in the next issue of 
the AIDS. „ 

Bulletins and Circulars . Two new circulars have been received since the last issue of the 
AIDS. They are- Illinois Circular 893 ; Soil Disinfestation — Methods and Materials, and 
Illinois Circular 895, Illinois Forage Handbook. A copy of the latter publication was in- 
cluded in December Agricultural Releases. For out-of-state readers, these publications 
are priced as follows: Circular 893 - 10<? each; Circular 895 - 15£ each, t\vm 

Items Omitted from November Releases Two items were omitted from November Agri- 
cultural Releases by mistake but have been included in the December Releases They are: 
Ag. Science Demonstration No = 4, "Checking and Calibrating Farm Sprayers" and "Plan 
for a Soil Shaker Block " Additional copies of the former are available and are listed on 
the tear sheet. In addition, the supply of the leaflet "Fitting and Showing Calves" from 
the Chicago Livestock Exchange ran out so were not included in all of the shipments of the 
November Releases, If you did not receive a copy, please let us know as we have a small 
supply on hand again. JWM 

Spray Painting Visuals, A set of 50 instructional illustrations on spray painting, printed 
on 82 x 11 sheets, was included in the December Agricultural Releases, These can be used 
with an opaque projector, for making transparencies for overhead projection, or for direct 
viewing.- Additional sets are available for those who are interested at 60£ per set, plus 
postage. They are included on the tear sheet. „ „,-, 

rlr Jii 
AIDS, December 1964 -1- 



Me ssage from Dean Karl E, Gardner 

It has been called to our attention by several vocational agriculture tea( hers that 
the new admission statement of the University of Illinois as transmitted recently to high 
school principals and guidance counselors by Dean of Admissions. C. W Sanford, docs no1 
specifically List vocational agriculture among the requirements As presently stated lei 
admission for the fail of 19(i (S , the following would be required for entrance to the College 
of Agriculture, 

Sui, Number of Units 

English 3 

Mathematics (Algebra and Plane Geometry) 2 

One or more units in at least three of the 
following fields: English (maximum of one 
unit in addition to the three units required), 
Foreign Language (2), ^Science, Social Studies, 
Mathematics (in addition to the two units re- 
quired) 5 

*Not General Science 



10 



Obviously, the above is a list of the absolute minimum requirements for entrance. 
it is purposely set 2 to 4 units lower than the requirements for all other Colleges of the 
University of Illinois at Urbana (Engineering, Commerce, Liberal Arts and Sciences, Fine 
and Applied Arts, Physical Education, and Education) so that vocational agriculture can 
still be scheduled in the high school program. There was no intent to omit vocational agri- 
culture in our thinking. 

Never has the College of Agriculture required that all students entering the College 
have vocational agriculture in the high school. It is quite obvious that such a requirement 
is impossible since many students come from schools where the subject is not even offered. 

This is to assure you there has been no change in our interest in having high school 
students take vocational agriculture when available In fact, we still note that some 62 per- 
cent of the entering freshmen in the College of Agriculture (fall, 1964) have taken one or more 
units of vocational agriculture. 

We still think that vocational agriculture teachers must encourage high school student 
to take a good load of solid academic subjects such as rhetoric, math, science, social studies, 
and the like if they plan to go to college The boy who has only 8 or 9 units of such subjects 
prior to entering the University is likely to find that he has been "short changed." 

KEG/JWM 

In-Service Courses Scheduled, We are continuing the practice of listing non-credit, in-servic 
courses that have been tentatively scheduled in the near future. Teachers in the sections in- 
volved will be notified directly but there may be teachers in nearby sections who would like to 
attend. If you are in this category, please let us know if you wish to attend so that we can plar 
for you and send you last minute details. 

Saturday, Dec. 5 Surveying Wapella, Section 16 9 a.m. 

Wednesday, Dec. 16 Small Engines Mt. Carmel, Section 23 4:30 p.m. 

Saturday, Jan. 9 Tractor Tune -Up Oakwood, Section 18 9 a.m. 



RFE 



AIDS, December 1964 -2- 



nge in Income Tax Standard Deduction The 1964 Revenue Act provides for a new method of 
claiming standard deductions For example the change now enables an FFA or 4-H member to 
earn up to $900 and have no tax to pay. Check further information in Farm Management Facts 
and Opinions Letter 64-20 of November 16, 1964 

Federal Orders for Marketing Milk. A single copy ol this item was included in the November 
Releases as a reminder that it is still available Additional copies we have on hand al the end 
of this school yea] will be given - or destroyed If any of you have use for this pu on 

it would be advisable for you to ordei i opies from us al this time ["here is no charge except 
po st age . 

New Slidefilm s, Four new slide films have been released and senl to .'II schools havin] 
orders for new slidefilms 

The new slidefilms that were sent are as follows 

404-64 Unpacking and Identifying Items in the Electrical Wiring Box 

463 The Power Grinder--How to Use It Safely (color) 

465 The Portable Elect! ic Saw—How to Use It Safely (color) 

708 Soil Color (color) 

If you have an advance order for slidefilms and did not receive these, please let us 
knew. 

All of the above films are now available to those who did not receive them on advanced 
order, They are listed on the tear sheet for the convenience of any wishing to ordei R1 ,. 

Corn Subject -Matter Packets , All orders for corn production packets received to date have been 
filled and we have approximately 100 packets left. Orders for these remaining packets are 
available at $lo75 plus postage, on a first come first served basis. It is included on the tear 
sheet for your convenience. RLC 

Arc Welding and Weed Identification Slidefilms , Shortly after receiving the December AIDS, 
you may expect to receive the second advanced order shipment of four new slidefilms, They 
are as follows 

Learning Arc Welding Skills 
450-64 No. 1 Process, Equipment, and Safety (color) 
451-64 No, 2 Flat Position Welding (color) 
452-64 No, 3 Vertical, Overhead, and Horizontal Position (color) 

491 Identification of Weeds (color) 

The series of three arc welding colored slidefilms listed above were cooperatively 
produced by the James F. Lincoln Arc Welding Foundation and Vocational Agriculture Service. 
This complete set of three films will sell for $5,00, plus postage, 

The Identification of Weeds colored slidefilm shows all of the weeds included in the 
Illinois State Judging Contest Rules. It is available at $2.35, plus postage. 

If you have an advance order for slidefilms and did not receive these slidefilms, 
please let us know. It is included on the tear sheet for those who may wish to order, 

RLC 
Current Dairy Feeding Recommendations . This pamphlet, prepared by dairy extension 
specialists, was included in December Agricultural Releases. Quantity copies are available 
on a limited basis. JWM 

AIDS, December 1964 -3- 



R esults of Survey of Adult Classes in Farm Mana g ement , The survey was made in May but we 
are using this means to report the major findings to the teachers., A survey form w; s sent for 
each of the 133 adull courses in Farm Management listed for the 1963-64 school y< i < 

The two-fold purpose oi the survej was to determine the major topi is Included 

in the adult courses in Farm Management and the areas in which tei need more ht 

Ninety-two forms wore returned, with five teachers stating they had not gone ahead to com- 
plex ourse A summarization whs made oi the other 87 r< p 

The firsl 14 questions deall with topics planned oi covered in the courses. A 
majority oi the topi Lsted wore Ln the i cm m tnagemenl n differeni 

areas < I altural Economics and stjij othe e in differeni areas of Agi L< u 

A. number of topics were included for which t< aching aids had been made a\ during 

the intensive farm management courses held the preceding summer. 

Teachers were asked to list the topics in farm management io^■ which 
subject matter aids are needed. Items mentioned three or more times were: 



Money management and credit 

Additional budgeting materials 

Records and record analysis 

Marketing 

Economics of fertilizer use 

Economics of machine purchase or use 

Dr. G, R. Fuller asked that two additional questions be included. One related to 
the need for course outlines or source units for teaching adults. Items mentioned three or 
more times were: 



Insurant 

Fa I'm Law 

Work simplification and materials hand 

Leases and partnerships 

Income tax and ta.\ management 



Farm planning 

Credit 

Budgeting 

Farm accounts and analysis 

Insurance 

Labor efficiency 

Livestock 



Crops 

Agr. chemicals 

Taxes 

Law 

Fitting machinery to the farm 

Marketing 

Agr. mechanics 



In the final question the teachers were asked to list the topics they had the most 
difficulty in developing methods and procedures for teaching. The following were mentioned 
three or more times: 



Organizations and programs 

Agr. mechanics 

Soils 



Farm accounts and analysis 

Farm planning 

Marketing 

Insurance 

Taxes 

Credit 

Budgeting 

We want to express our appreciation to the teachers who participated in the survey. 

JHH 



AIDS, December 1964 



Farmer's Tax Guide. The current edition of the Farmer's Tax Guide is included in the 
Dec< mb .' ei >es, No additional copies are available Erom the College ol Agriculture, 
However, the) can proba obtained from your local [nternal Revenue Office in the 

Latter pari of December. .„„ 

Dairy ( alf Sale, Professo] J G Cash of the Dairy Departmenl has asked us to announce 
the 17th annual PDGA dairy i le to be held at the Stock Pavilion on Saturday Feb- 27, 

L965 A copj ol the catalog will be senl to i ach vo( ational agriculture instruct©] in Illinois 
as soon as thej are off the p] II the catalog doesn'1 answer all oi youj questions, you 

can contacl Professor Cash direct <m notifj Vocational Agriculture Service and we will try 
to gel the ansv >u» rGC/WHW 

New Scrambled Bo ok Re leased, Scrambled Book No 105, Making the Butte rial Test, has 
been completed and a cop\ was included in December Ag] [cultural Releases, it is nov 
available at 10^ per copv, plus postage, and is listed on the tear shi ™ttt™, 

WHW 

Planning Your Farm Business . Supplies of this publication have been temporarily exhausted 
Another printing is planned; we estimate 3 that copies will not be available until sometime in 
January. We will carry an announcement in the AIDS when copies do become available* 

JHH 

DON'T FORGET SHEEP DAY AT UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS DECEMBER 11. 



Bred Ewe and Lamb Sale . We received the following announcement from Maynard 
Boudreau: 

Illinois Hampshire Association Bred Ewe and Lamb Sale 

1. Illinois State University sale pavilion, Normal, Illinois, December 29, 1964. 

2. Fifty head registered Hampshire bred ewes and ewe lambs. 

3. Ewes will be bred yearling and two-year old ewes. Ewe lambs will be open. 

4. Sale catalogs available from Maynard Boudreau, Rte. 1, Chebanse, Illinois. 



AIDS, December 1964 -5- 



NEW BOOKS 



The following have been added to our library since the last 
issue of the AIDS All of our books are available for review 
in our office by those interested, As long as the editions 
are current, they will be included in such exhibits as the one 
at the Annual Conference of Vocational Agriculture Teachers. 



INSECT PESTS OF LIVESTOCK. POULTRY AND PETS, 



AND THEIR CONTROL 1964 , 



$4 00. Rudolph Seiden, Springer Publishing Company. 44 East 23rd Street. New York 
Following is extracted from publisher's description of this book: 

"This new pocket dictionary : is for people primarily concerned 
1th the use of pesticides — veterinarians and lay users manu- 
facturers and distribute- 
After Rachel Carson's SILENT SPRING and the 1964 pesticidi 
it is reassuring to have Dr. Seiden, one of the country's le 
chemists and consultants in the field, stal the most dange 

ous insecticide, which kills all par; - - suppos. ill, can 

be applied sai on the pertinent warni 

has put into this book 'all the pre< 

necessary' to make the handling ol and dangerous in- 

safe for beast and man " 



RFD -THE CHANGING FA 






University P .loomington. India 

The toll :atements the put . 

. 
of one branch of the po- 
from the old rural America to the 

in the country in the early 1900' -e story 

politics in its most colorful aspects It is the stO; .can 

enterprise as seen in the fabulous growth of the great mail-order 
And ii is finally, the story of American determination demonstrated 
the ultimately successful passage from the old. established 
into one new and dvnamic. " 



AIDS, December 1964 




AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION / COLLEGE OF EDUCATION / UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Votec 474, This course. Supervised Agricultural Experiences :: :onal Agriculture . 

ght on the campus the second st . - -9:00 \. 

Hemp will be The s1 tor and tfa - 11 meet in room 33 Education Build: lg 

icultural Education Seminar room. Teachers within driving distance s to 

e course has beer si _ 1) coop. 

programs in agricult . grams *m 

agricultural occupations - semester of 19- " - ne 

he cour- s necess 
n in agricultui-. T Tp 

This inch - - 

i are in1 a in 

- soon. Enro limey 
in mus* - :ed anc 

T TT> 



Dr. Paul Hemp and Dr, 5 s of a r 

Guide for Placement -Employment Pro- - ultural Business and Inci 

rom Interstate Printers and Publishers. Danville. Tllino- 
able book for teacher- - ho have pupils prepa^ ing . - an 

farming , invol\ing knowledge and skill in a_ ..re . , yp 

Teacher Placement Report . As of November 17. one vocational agriculture vaca;: 

Hsted with the Educational Placement Office. Seven seniors will qualify for teaching at the 

close of the fall semester in January. Three of these seven seniors hope to start teaching 

immediately fo Rowing graduation. The other four men hope to begin graduate work in 

February. 1965 ; „„„ 

Pi.H 

Student Leaders , Alpha Tau Alpha and the Ag. Ed. Club recently held elections for offi. 
who are to serve during the second semester. Students elected, their home high school - 
and names of their vocational agriculture teachers are as folio 



ALPHA TAU ALPHA 



Office 
President 

First Vice President 
Second Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 
Ag Council 

AIDS. December 1964 



Student 
Mike Still 
Allen Hombrook 

an Naylor 
Ron Greenfield 

Roger Allaman 
John Hillison 



Mt. Zion 
Young America 
- -ton 
boy 

Ro Seville 
Ambov 



_■;:.-•.■■- 
W\ E. Bucy 
Banta Bundy 
Herschel MePheron 
Albert Tie 
Russell Alderson 
B. A. Tomlin 
Russell Alderson 
(continued) 



AG, ED. CLUB 

Office Student Home High School Voc- Agr. Teacher 

President John Huston Roseville B. A, Tomlin 

Vice President Allen Hornbrook Young America Banta Bundy 

Secretary Roger Allaman Roseville B A„ Tomlin 

Treasurer Gerald Mayberry Norris City Jerry Kuykendall 

Reporier Alan Naylor Ashton Herschel McPheron 

Ag, Council Mike Still Mt. Zion W„ E. Bucy 

PEH 



AIDS, December 1964 -2- 




fAVAT 



NEWS 



ILLINOIS ASSN. OF VO-AG TEACHERS 



TO EACH HIS MOON 

Dr. J. E, Goldman, Director, Scientific Laboratory, Ford Motor Company, gave 
this advice to the agriculture teachers at the Ford Motor Company's banquet at the National 
FFA Convention,, 

'Give each of them a moon. Then teach him how to think — -mathematically 
and semantically. Provide him with the logic of reasoning and then with the means 
with which to communicate, Fertilize his mind with curiosity and challenge so he 
can harvest the bounty of knowledge and stock the silo of mankind's technology. 
For with an intellectual moon at the end of his rainbow, he will more readily con- 
quer the more physical and materialistic world, 

I am proud to come here tonight from an industrial organization that gives 
more than lip service to the support of truly basic science in an atmosphere 
conducive to scholarship and to advancement of the frontiers of knowledge as 
well as technology, I will be even more proud if I have been able to stir just one 
of you to point just one of your students to just one moon," 

^^^^ ^^ 
SERVICE AWARDS 

We are proud of the service our members have contributed to vocational agricul- 
ture and we wish to express this gratitude to those of you who have reached the 10, 20, 25, 
30 and 35 year milestones this year. 



SO , will you P - L - E 
eligible for one of these awards ? 



JUDGING TEAMS 



- A - S - E inform me (E, L. 
We need to order them soon. 



Rice, Princeville) if you are 






Our congratulations go to the Danvers FFA Chapter and their adviser, Joe McGann, 
for representing Illinois in the National FFA Dairy Judging Contest held at Waterloo, Iowa; 
the Shelbyville FFA Chapter and their adviser, Kenneth Diehl, for representing Illinois in the 
National FFA Livestock Judging Contest held at Kansas City, Missouri; and the Spoon River 
Valley FFA Chapter, Fairview, and their adviser, Charles Ham, for representing Illinois at 
the National FFA Poultry Judging Contest held at Kansas City, Missouri. 






AIDS, December 1964 



From "NEWS & VIEWS OF NVATA" 

Recommendations Adopted by the FFA Boards of Student Officers and Directors on Integration 
of the FFA-NFA. 

1, States concerned should set up State Committees to study and work on the 
problem of merging the NFA with the FFA, 

2, Have professional Negro educators serve as consultants at meetings of 
the FFA Board of Directors. 

3, NFA members, meeting the qualifications of the National FFA Constitution, 
will begin FFA membership, at comparable degrees, on July 1, 1965, where 
administratively permissible, and in accordance with approved State Plans 
for Vocational E due at ion „ 

4, The la,st National NFA Convention will be held not later than October, 1965, 
for presentation of final awards and for completion of the merging of the 
NFA with the FFA, 

5, Selected former NFA officers, or members, should attend the 1965 National 
FFA Convention for special activities which will be held in connection with 
the merging of the two organizations. 

U, So Office Reorganization 

On September 28, 1964 the Agricultural Education Branch along with the other branches 
of vocational education ceased to exist., Instead there now exists three branches, namely, 
Professional Resources, Field Administration and Research and Development, which embrace 
all areas of vocational education, The old administrative set-up of four regions has been dis- 
carded in favor of a nine region plan. 

For a complete explanation of the new plan, please refer to the October issue of the 
AVA Journal c 

The reorganization could and probably will have far reaching effects on vocational 
agriculture, the FFA and the NVATA„ It will receive considerable discussion at the national 
convention. 

IAVAT MEMBERSHIP 

According to our secretary, Joe Berger, 445 out of 453 teachers have paid their clues. 
I would like to extend a personal invitation to those eight men who have not done so to join our 
group and help us promote vocational agriculture. 

I've Heard That No News is Good News 

I'm sorry I can't report any news of our sectional activities but you've all heard the 
old story that "Mother Hubbard's cupboard was bare"". Since your president, doubling as news 
editor, is getting old and doddering, how about humoring him with a few news articles ? This 
is hard work, trying to write a newsletter with no news. I need your articles by December 15th 
for the January AIDS. 

Your IAVAT Executive Committee hopes each of you had a bountiful Thanksgiving 
and that you will enjoy a Merry Christmas and have a happy and prosperous New Year. 

AIDS, December 1964 -2- 



WHY I TEACH 

I'm sometimes asked, "Why do you teach?" 

I never wonder why. 

There are so many reasons, 

All good ones to reply. 

I teach for that Great Supervisor 
Who looks down from His desk in the Sky 
And says, "A small child shall lead them," 
To that glorious Schoolroom on high. 

I teach because in the face of a child 
That lifts itself up to me, 
I see strength and faith, love and hope, 
And all that they want ME to be. 

It demands that I live in a finer way, 
As they come with their joys and their cares. 
I see need to build for the greater tasks 
That will very soon be theirs. 

I teach for the nourishment of my soul, 
That comes from the daily touch 
Of a little hand that hunts for mine 
And means so very much. 

I teach because I love each child 
In a special and different way; 
Whether strong or weak, wise or dull, 
They offer a challenge each day. 

I teach in the call of duty; 
For those personalities grand, 
Who are recruits for my profession. 
And needed throughout our land* 

I teach because I love the friends 

Who have faith in me through the years , 

In trusting me with their boys and girls 

The treasures they hold most dear. 

And finally, my good friends, 

I teach as all of us do 

For that blessed event--my pay check — 
I like to be honest, don't you? 



AIDS, December 1964 -3- 



(tear sheet) 



TO: Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61803 

Please send the following items: 

Price Total 
Number each * Amount 
~,1 



VAS 1008a Making the Butterfat Test, 8 p. 

VAS 1037 Caring for the Sow and Litter at Farrowing Time, 8p,„ 

VAS 2002a Inventory Your Resources for Farm Planning, 12 p. 

VAS 2003a Planning for Sound Land-Use, 12 p. 

VAS 2005a Developing the Land-Use Plan and Field Layout, 8p. 

VAS 2038 Capitalism, Socialism, and Communism, 12 p. 

VAS 4010a Planning a Fertilizer Program, 8 p. 

VAS 4023a Producing Oats, 12 p. 

VAS 4047 Controlling Insects of Vegetable Crops, 20 p. 

IPrice per copy in parentheses applies if total order is for more than 1, 000 pages. Otherwise, 
price is 10 per page. 

Spray Painting Visuals, set of 50 

Scrambled Book No. 105 - Making the Butterfat Test 



80(60)- 

80(60) 
120(90) 
12ft9$) 

8<?(6<i) 
12^(9$) 

80(60) 
120(90) 
200(160) 



600 
100 



1.21 
2.58 

2.82 
2.55 

5.00 



2 


,35 


1. 


.75 


,03 



Slidefilm 404-64 - Unpacking and Identifying Items in the 

Electrical Wiring Box 
Slidefilm 463 - The Power Grinder, How to Use it Safely (Color) 
Slidefilm 465 - The Portable Electric Saw, How to Use it 

Safely (Color) 
Slidefilm 708 - Soil Color (Color) 

Set of 3 Slidefilms on Arc Welding (Color) 
450-64 - Process, Equipment and Safety 
451-64 - Flat Position Welding 
452-64 - Vertical, Overhead and Horizontal 
Position Welding 

Slidefilm 791 - Identification of Weeds (Color) 

Subject -Matter Packet on Corn Production 

Ag, Science Demonstration No. 4 - Checking and Calibrating 
Farm Sprayers 



*Prices do not include postage, 
Name 



School 



Address 



Billing_ 



AIDS, December 1964 



INDEX TO ITEMS IN VO-AG SERVICE SECTION 



Arc Welding and Weed Identification Slidefilms 3 

Bulletins and Circulars . 1 

Change in Income Tax Standard Deduction . 3 

Corn Subject -Matter Packets 3 

Current Dairy Feeding Recommendations 3 

Dairy Calf Sale ... ........ 5 

Farmer's Tax Guide 5 

Federal Orders for Marketing Milk 3 

In-Service Courses Scheduled ...... 2 

Items Omitted from November Releases 1 

Message from Dean Gardner ........................ 2 

New Books 6 

New Scrambled Book Released ....................... 5 

New Slidefilms 3 

New Subject Matter Units 1 

Planning Your Farm Business ....................... 5 

Results of Survey of Adult Classes in Farm Management ........... 4 

Spray Painting Visuals 1 



AIDS, December 1964 



PRICE LIST OF FEEDS- 



November 20, 1964 



The feed prices for many of the feedstuffs used in vocational agriculture projects are listed 
below. This list is meant to be used as a basis of values for all boys obtaining their feed at 
home. All feed actually purchased should, of course, be recorded at prices paid. 



Kind of feed November 20 

Corn, shelled, bu. , . . , , . .. « 1.08 

Corn, ground shelled, bu. 1.18 

Corn, ground ear. bu. 1.18 

Oats, bu. .60 

Oats, ground, bu.. .70 

Barley, (feed) bu.. . . , 1.06 

Barley, ground or rolled, bu. ................ 1.16 

Sorghum, grain, cwt. 2,02 

Sorghum, grain, cracked, cwt.. ........................ 2.12 

Garbage and kitchen waste, ton 8.50 

Skim and buttermilk, cwt. 1.50 

Whole milk, Grade B, cwt. 3.00 

Corn silage, ton 10.00 

Sorghum silage, ton 9.00 

Grass silage, ton. ..... 

No preservative added. ........................ 8.00 

Preserved with 70-100 lb. molasses. .................. 9.00 

Preserved with 150-200 lb. ground corn 10.00 

Clover and mixed hay) All hay prices are . . . . , . 22 , 00 

Alfalfa ) for baled hay and straws , 25.00 

Timothy hay ) Loose hay $5 less per ton 22.00 

Oat straw or wheat straw 18.00 



- Prepared by W. W. Albert, Dept. of Animal Science. University of Illinois, Urbana. Illinois 



AIDS, December 1964 



VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE SERVICE 

Unlv«r»lty of Illinois - Call*** ot Agriculture 

434 MUMFORD HALL • URBANA, ILLINOIS 



SERIALS EPARTMENT SSHL 

UN IV OF ILL LIBRARY 



VO-AG AIDS 



Volume 23 , Number 6 
January 1965 



luiwd Jointly by 

Vocational Agriculture Service, College of Agriculture 

and 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

in Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 



VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 



Changes in State Judging Contests , The executive committee of the IAVAT has recommended 
that we do not send out the judging rules until after the committee meets again about March 1 
This will be about 2 months later than usual. The}' suggested, however, that we give you the 
changes as decided to date. They are as follows: 

In the crop seed class, broom corn, buckwheat, castor beans, flax, hemp, millet, rape, rice, 

r beets, tobacco, vetch, and white clover have been deleted and fescue and ladino clover 
added. The list as revised is as follows: 



Alfalfa 
Alsike clo\ 
Barley 

Birdsfoot trefoil 
Bromegrass 
Corn 
Cotton 
Crimson clover 



Fescue 

Ky bluegrass 
Ladino clo 1 
Lespedeza 
Oats 

Orchard grass 
Red clover 
Red top 



Rye 

Sorghum, grain 

Soybeans 

Sudan grass 

Sunflower 

Sweet clover 

Timothy 

Wheat 



In the weed slide class, corn cockle, rough cinquefoil, wild buckwheat, and wild salsify have 
been dropped, so the list as revised is as follows: 



Annual mornin 
Barnyard grass 

adleaf plantain 
Buckhorn 
Bull nettle 
Canada thistle 
Cheat 
Cocklebur 
Common ragweed 
Crab grass 
Curled dock 



Evening primrose 
Field bindweed 
Giant foxtail 
Giant ragweed 
Jim son 

Johnson grass 
Lambs quarter 
Leafy spurge 
Milkweed 
Ox-eye daisy 
Pepper grass 



Perennial sow thistle 
Quack grass 
Red sorrel 
Rough pigweed 
Smartweed 
Spanish needle 
Velvet weed 
Wild carrot 
Wild mustard 
Wild parsnip 
Yellow foxtail 



(These are the weeds included in Slidefilm 7 91) 



WHW 



Adult Class Assistance — Concrete. Claude A. Kincaid, Farm Field Engineer, Portland 
Cement Association, will accept dates for Adult Evening Classes of 15 members or more. 
Colorful Slide illustrated programs are available on the following subjects: 

Making Quality Concrete for Farm Improvements 
Building with Concrete Masonry 
Heated Concrete Floors for Farrowing Houses 
Concrete Feeding Floors and Paved Barnyards 
Horizontal Silos Above and Below Grade 
Tilt-Up Farm Building Construction 
Concrete Feed Bunk Automated Installations 
Confinement Hog Production Structures 

(continued) 

AIDS, January 1965 -1- 



Should you desire Mr. Kincaid's participation in your Adult Evening Programs, select two 
of the subjects applicable to your group and correspond directly with Mr» Kincaid who lives 
at 2101 Brentwood Drive, Springfield, Illinois 62704, 

Crop Varieties Recommended for Illinois „ Through the thoughtfulness of Dr, W\ O. Scott, 
Department of Agronomy, we are sending in the January Agricultural Releases a wall chart 
showing the crop varieties recommended for Illinois in 1965 This chart lists the varieties 
of small grains, legumes, and grasses that are currently recommended for the northern, 
central, and southern sections of Illinois, Additional copies are not available, but you may 
write for a single copy if you do not receive Agricultural Releases. RT C 

Sample Grain Rings for J udging , Grain judging rings for corn, oats, soybeans, and wheat 
are being made available to vocational agriculture departments by the Field and Furrow Club 
at the University of Illinois, Each ring will consist of four 8-ounce samples with an official 
placing and reasons. Orders will be accumulated until January 15 and shipment will be made 
as soon as possible after this date< 

Each ring will sell for $2, 00, or $7 , 50 for the complete set of four, plus postage from Urban;: 
Charges can be placed against your open account. This item is included on the tear sheet for 
the convenience of those who may wish to order. pT „ 

Corn Subject -Matter Packets . The response for the remaining 100 corn packets was over- 
whelming We received orders for about 250, so we decided to make up an additional 500 
packets o These new packets should be made up by January 1, so anyone desiring this ma- 
terial for adult classes may order Please refer to the December AIDS for order blank, 

RLC 

Illinois Custom Spray School . The 17th Annual Illinois Custom Spray School will be held Jan- 
uary 20-21 in the Illini Room, Illini Union, Urbana< Some of the topics include: New Corn 
Disease (4 articles), Ultra -low Volume Insecticide Applicators (3 articles), Insecticide and 
Herbicide Soil Residue (7 articles), Pre-emergence Herbicides (5 articles), and Alfalfa 
Weevil (3 articles). This years Custom School will feature several out-of-state speakers 
from the US DA at Brookings, S. Dakota; Iowa State, Michigan State, University of Missouri, 
and the USDA. 

All persons interested in agricultural chemicals are invited to attend. As in the past, copies 
of the summaries of presentations will be included in the March issue of Agricultural Releases. 

RLC 

In-Service Courses Scheduled. We are continuing the practice of listing non-credit, in-service 
courses that have been tentatively scheduled in the near future. Teachers in the sections 
involved will be notified directly but there may be teachers in nearby sections who would like 
to attend. If you are in this category, please let us know if you wish to attend so that we can 
plan for you and send you last minute details. 

Saturday, January 9, 1965 Tractor Tune-Up Oakwood, Section 18 9:00 A.M 

Monday, January 18, 1965 Electrical Controls Waverly, Section 15 4.00 P.M.. 

Friday, January 22, 1965 Plumbing Crescent City, Section 10 4:30 P.M. 

RFE 
AIDS, January 1965 -2- 



New Slidefilms ., Nine new slidefilms have been released and sent to all schools having 
advance orders for new slidefilms. 

The new slidefilms that were sent are as follows: 

*166-64 Selecting Breeding Hogs 

404-64 Unpacking and Identifying Items in the Electrical Wiring Box 
463 The Power Grinder --How to Use It Safely (Color) 

Learning Arc Welding Skills: 

450-64 No. 1 Process, Equipment, and Safety (Color) 

451-64 No. 2 Flat Position Welding (Color) 

452-64 No 3 Vertical, Overhead, and Horizontal Position (Color) 

465 The Portable Electric Saw— How to Use It Safely (Color) 

708 Soil Color (Color) 

791 Identification of Weeds (Color) 

*This slidefilm was not announced in the December AIDS, It is a 74-frame black and white 
slidefilm that discusses the points you should consider in selecting breeding hogs. Price 
$1.29, plus postage. 

If you have an advanced order for slidefilms and did not receive these, please let us know. 

All of the above films are now available and are listed on one of the tear sheets for the con- 
venience of any wishing to order „ T „ 

Winter Sho rt Cou r se at U. of I. February 1 to March 12 . Young farmers, age 18 or over, 
who are Lnt< i ted in bringing their agricultural knowledge up to date, can enroll for any of 
the 6-week courses in — agricultural economics, agricultural engineering, agronomy, animal 
science, dairy science, horticulture, turf and park management, and veterinary medicine 
Cost of the short course will range fix>m $225 to $290, depending on the courses and housing 
accommodations the individual student chooses. 

Aids include some $100 scholarships to be given by local banks and twenty $50 FFA scholar- 
ships offered by the Illinois FFA Foundation to FFA members who can meet short course 
requirements Registration deadline is January 22, but applicants can enroll up to February 
1 Interested persons may write Warren Wessels, Short Course Supervisor, 104 Mumford 

Hall, Urbana. „ ATr 

EAK 

Farm Financial Management Materials , By this time all orders for these materials should 
have been received. We are stocking the forms and the problems used in the summer program. 
These are listed on one of the tear sheets, along with other items which remain in quantities 
of 100 or more. TITTjr 

Jrirl 

Standards f or Measures of Efficiency The 1964 revision of this item is being included with 
the January Agr. Releases. Additional copies of the item can be obtained for 5 cents each, 
plus postage, by use of one of the tear sheets in this issue of the AIDS The item furnishes 
a means of comparison for record results obtained by students or farmers. „,„ 



AIDS, January 1965 -3- 



Analysis Charts for Livestock . This item has been revised so that a single set of headings 

can be used for each kind of livestock enterprise. These charts can be used to plot a student's 

livestock enterprise results on a chart for comparison with other class members or farmers, 

A sample chart filled in for a hog enterprise is also available. These items appear on one of 

the tear sheets in this issue of the AIDS, 

JHH 

The Farm Index, We have been receiving this publication and were under the impression that 
individual teachers were also receiving it. It contains much information and is presented in 
simple, interesting terminology. We have found out that individuals wanting the item will need 
to write a letter or postcard to: Editor, The Farm Index , Economic Research Service, Room 
1459, U So Department of Agriculture, Washington, D C. 20250 It is our understanding 
that the publication is free to those requesting it. 

JHH 

Bullet ins and Circulars . We have received one new circular since the last issue of the AIDS 
It is 111. Cir . 894, Principles of Ruminant Digestion. A copy was included in the January Agri- 
cultural Releases. For out-of-state orders, the cost of this publication is IOC 

Tra ctor Safety is No Accident. This is the title of a leaflet received from Mr. O, L. Hogsett, 
Farm Safety Specialist, and included in January Releases. Quantity copies are available as 
long as the supply lasts. You may direct your request to Mr. Hogsett at 330 Mumford Hall 
or we will forward it to him if you send it to us, TWM 

Materials Available for Small Engines Work. Several teachers have asked about aids avail- 
able from industry for teaching units on small engines We have brought the following infor- 
mation up to date by writing to various companies 

BRIG GS AND STRATTON 

Will furnish without charge to schools that agree to conduct a regular course on 
small engines, and will use material for educational, classroom purposes only: 
1 An engine of their choice 

2. Copies of publication "General Theories of Operation" 

3. Copies of publication "Repair Instructions" 

4. Set of wall charts 

Additional engines may be purchased at 50% off list price. Slides ax-e also avail- 
able on a charge basis 

Write to: Mr, J M„ Gerathy, Service Production Manager, Briggs and Stratton 
Corp. , 2711 North 13th Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 

CLINTON 

Will furnish a two-cycle or four-cycle engine at no charge except freight from 

Maquoketa, Iowa. Requests should go to Clinton Central Warehouse Distributor. 

Also available "1964 Field Service Clinic Manual" at $1.00 

Write for these and list of other aids to: 

Illinois Auto Electric Company Borbein-Young Company 

20311-37 Indiana Avenue or 3663 Forest Park Boulevard 

Chicago, Illinois St, Louis, Missouri 

AIDS, January 1965 -4- 



JACQBSEN 

"We have made available, for instructional purposes, an institutional 
Package consisting of one of our Jacobsen two-cycle 3 h.p. engines, 
one Jacobsen Engine Repair Manual, and one Jacobsen Special Tool 
Kit at $34.50 f.o.b. Racine, Wisconsin." 

Write to: Jacobsen Manufacturing Company, Service Department, 
1721 Packard Avenue, Racine, Wisconsin. 

LAUSON- POWER PRODUCTS 

Power -Products two-cycle engines Our choice of model and horsepower, 

$14.00 each, f.o.b. factory. 

Lauson four-cycle engines Our choice of model and horsepower, 
$18.00 each, f.o.b. factory. 

Mechanic's Handbook $1.00 

Lauson-Power Products Combined Master Manual $10.00 

Power Products Tool Kit $10.00 

Lauson Too] Kit $10.00 

Colored Training Slides (several sets available at varying prices) 
Special school order blank available on request. 

Write: Tecumseh Products Company, Parts Depot, Grafton, Wisconsin 

LAWN -B OY 

"Materials Available to Educational Institutions 

New Lawn-Boy Engines The new Lawn -Boy Finger-Tip Start, 
I o-cycle Engine ("D" series) is available to schools at a special 
price of $19.94 each. 

Portable Engine Mount $3.50 each (Can be bolted to bench or placed 
in a vise to hold engine.) 

Lawn -Boy Mechanic's Handbook Covers service, maintenance and 
repair. It also contains sections on two-cycle operation, trouble- 
shooting chart, etc, $1.00 each. 

Order blank for special service tools, paint, etc. available on request. 

Write: Lawn-Boy Service Department, Outboard Marine Corporation, 
Galesburg, Illinois 

KOHLER 



Educational materials suitable for classroom use available on a no -charge 
basis. Write: Service Department, Engine and Electric Plant Division, 
Kohler Co. , Kohler, Wisconsin. 

For information on the acquisition of engines directly from the factory, 
write Mr. F. W. Nelson, Sales and Service Coordinator, Engine and Electric 
Plant Division, Kohler Co. , Kohler, Wisconsin. 



AIDS, January 1965 -5- 



Summer School Courses in Agriculture . The following information was provided by Dean 
Karl E. Gardner: 

The College of Agriculture will offer the following courses on a four-week basis from June 22 
through July 16, 1965 which may be of interest to teachers of vocational agriculture: 



Instructor 



Course and Title 
Agr, Econ. 324 - Farm Operation 

An. Sci, 301 - Beef Production 

An„ ScL 330 - Reproduction and Artificial 

Insemination of Farm Animals 

(Same as Dairy ScL 330) 
Rural Soc, 477 - Rural Community Organizations 

and Development 

In addition to these, special problems courses may be arranged in several departments. 



Credit 
3 hrs, or 3/4 to 

1 unit 
3 hrs. or 3/4 

unit 
3 hrs, or 1/2 

unit 

1 unit 



Wills 

Garrigus and Albert 

Lodge and Graves 

Lindstrom 



JWM 



AIDS, January 1965 



-6- 



I 







AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION! NEWS 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION / COLLEGE OF EDUCATION / UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Freshmen enrollment in Agricultural Education. The names of the freshmen students 
enrolled in agricultural education at the University of Illinois, their home schools, and 
the names of their vocational agriculture teachers are as follows: 



Name 

1. Anderson, George 

2. Buikeman, Vernon 

3. Compton, Alan 

4 Cravens, James R 

5. Croft, John 

6. Currie, Glenn 

7. Douglass, Fred C 

8. Dow, Robert 

9. Espe, Richard 

10 Greenwood, Larry David 

11 Harris, Philip Ray 
12 . Hayes, Gerald 

13 . Heavner, Charles 

14, Helt, Philip Ray 

15. Hoff, Harlan 

16 Korth, Ronald Francis 

17. Miller, Harry Edward 

18. Monti, David 

19. Myre, Arthur 

20. Nolte, Thomas John 

21. O'Connor, Dennis Lee 

22. Paulson, Steven 

23. Peters, Mervin Gene 

24. Riskedal, Stephen Kenneth 
25 Ronna, Richard C. 

26. Scherer, Ronald 

27. Schoney, Richard 

28. Schoonover, Edwin 

29. Smith, Roger E. 

30. Smith, Russell 

31. Taylor, Richard 



Home High School 

Shabbona 

Thomson 

Shelbyville 

Tri-City 

Leaf River 

Paxton 

Woodstock 

Flora 

Shabbona 

Mulberry Grove 

Shabbona 

Hillsboro 

East Pike 

Martinsville 

Thomson 

Shabbona 

Hillsboro and Lincolnwood 

Cai'linville 

Seneca 

Brussels 

Unity 

Rockfox-d (Auburn) 

Paxton 

Leland 

Milford 

Olney 

Lena-Winslow 

Louisville 

Findlay 

Benton 

Catlin 



Vo-Ag Teacher 
Porter Martin 
Wm. Gengenbach 
Kenneth Diehl 
Henry Gartner 
Wilbert Asbury 
Robert Rohlfing 
George Forgey 
G. S, Zimmerman 
Porter Martin 
Russell Weger 
Porter Martin 
Ed Voils 

Charles Ferguson 
John Beaty 
Wm. Gengenbach 
Porter Martin 
Carroll Turner and 

Wm. Doerr 
Stan Klaus and 

Gary Ellis 
Sherwood Jackson 
G. F. Brock 
J. Clark Esarey 

Robert Rohlfing 
Wm. McMurtry 
Ralph Goodman 
L. T. Clark, Lee Shafer 

and Bobby Whittington 
Wm. Holak and Carl Miller 
Grover Burkett 
Jerry Kuykendall 
Bernard Finley 
Charles Lane, John Boyer, 

and Russell Holstine 



AIDS, January 1965 



■ 









I 



] 



i 



- 
- ■ 



i2. Thomas, Larry Clinton Leaf River Wilbert Asbury 

t3. Unger, Charles Byron Lincolnwood Wm. Doerr 

!4. Watkins, James Neoga Louis Wagner 

S5, West, Thomas P. Ridgway Jack Wiggins 

!6. Wise, Dale A. Macon Luther Wells 

Ul but one of these freshmen came through the vocational agriculture ranks. Many of them 
ire State Farmers and former chapter officers. Approximately 61 percent of the freshmen 
jroup ranked in the upper quarter of their high school graduating class. Most of these 
students tell us that their vocational agriculture teachers were key people in helping them 
iecide to come to college and enroll in agricultural education. Congratulations to these 
eachers and others like them who are helping provide the agriculture teachers for tomorrow. 

PEH 

Placement report. Three Illinois high schools are searching for vocational agriculture teachers 
'or the second semester of the 1964-65 school year. It appears that all beginning teachers de- 
siring teaching positions for the second semester will be placed. 

Salary data for vocational agriculture teachers placed through the University of Illinois Educa- 
ional Placement Office during the 1964 placement season are as follows: 

Years of teaching Number Mean Annual 

experience of teachers Salary 

15 $5973 

1-5 11 $6736 

6-10 5 $7020 

11 or more 8 $7775 

PEH 

\dvanced Certificate Degree Programs Planned . The following additional teachers have corn- 



Dieted official plans for their Advanced Certificate degrees: 

Wayne Blunier - Cullom 

Maynard Boudreau - Clifton-Chebanse 

Ralph Buswell - Watseka 

Eldon Chapman - Herscher 

J. V. Griffin - St. Anne 

Donald Higgs - Streator 

Loren Mills - Belvidere 

Harry White - Fairbury 

These men are to be congratulated for planning programs of continuing professional growth. 

AHK 

Registration Information . Registration for the second semester is scheduled for Wednesday, 
Feb. 3 to 3:00 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 6. The Saturday, February 6, registration schedule 
will be from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. for the benefit of commuting teachers. 



LJP 



yotec 474, Supervised Agriculture Experience Programs , will be offered on the U. of I. 



campus on Tuesday evenings from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. by Dr. Paul Hemp. This is one of the 
courses that may be used by teachers of agriculture to qualify themselves officially to con- 
duct cooperative programs in agriculture. 

LJP 

A.IDS, January 1965 -2- 



S taff Members Attend AVA Convention . All full-time staff members, Gerald Fuller; Paul 
Hemp; Alfred Krebs; Lloyd Phipps; and Robert Warmbrod, attended the American Vocational 
Association convention in December., Dr 3 Krebs was elected President of American Assoc- 
iation of Teachers Educations in Agriculture and Dr, Phipps was elected to the Board of 
Trustees of the American Technical Education Association. 

LJP 



AIDS, January 1965 -3- 




I A VAT 



NEWS 



ILLINOIS ASSN. OF VO-AG TEACHERS 



ARE YOU ELIGIBLE? ? ? ? ? 

Once again, let me say we are proud of the service our members have contributed 
to Vocational Agriculture and we wish to express this gratitude to those of you who have 
reached the 10, 20, 25, 30, and 35 year milestones this year. Last year there were 37 
men so honored. As of December 15, 1964, 7 men have notified me of their eligibility. 
Surely there are more. Please let me know at your earliest possible convenience. The 
names of the men I have received as of December 15 are as follows: 

10 years - Steve Kingry 

20 years - Vernon Luther 

25 years - Robert VanRheeden, Stanley Klaus, and E. 

30 years - Louis Templeton, C. N. DeHart 



N. Gates 



s(cii;^:^4;^c 



PLAN NOW TO ATTEND 



This year the IVA Convention will be held at the Pere Marquette Hotel in Peoria, 
Feb. 26-27. Mel Nicol, our Vice-President, has lined up a fine program for the IAVAT 

section of the convention. Added attraction Jesse Keyser, Voc. Agr. Instructor at 

Lawrenceville , is President of IVA this year. 






NOTICE TO IAVAT EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The IAVAT Executive Committee will meet Saturday morning, Feb. 27, 1965, at 
8:00 A.M. in the Pere Marquette, Please plan to attend if at all possible. 

COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN TAKE NOTE 

How are your committees functioning? Mel Nicol will appreciate receiving your 
reports as early as possible. He needs time to assemble them and Vo-Ag Service needs 
time to print them. 



AIDS, January 1965 



FTEND IAA ANNUAL MEETING 



I had the privilege and pleasure of representing IAVAT at the 50th Annual Meeting of 
e Illinois Agricultural Association held in the Sheman House, Chicago, Illinois, on Wednes- 
ty and Thursday, November 18-19. Activities started with an informal dinner for the 
leaker, guests, and their wives in the Louis XVI Room. Following the dinner, we were 
corted to the Speaker's Platform in the Grand Ballroom for the general session. Thanks 
past leadership and past and present membership I was proud to "stand tall" when intro- 
,ced along with Ralph Guthrie and J. E. Hill and presidents of other agricultural organi- 
.tions in the state. Captain Edward V. Rickenbacker, United States Air Force hero of two 
rid wars delivered the address of the evening. We enjoyed the hospitality of our host and 
stess, IAA Director Clair Hemphill and his wife at the banquet and reminisced with 
lother Director, Paul Ives, at the reception. 

/ATA & AVA CONVENTION 



The NVATA held its 16th Annual Convention in Minneapolis, December 5-9 with almost 
i0 members registering. Those from Illinois in attendance at the NVATA and AVA were: 
ilph Guthrie, Chief; Harold Engelking, Supervisor; Orville Floyd, Supervisor; George 
chter, Supervisor; Vernon E. Burgener, Head, Statistics & Research; all of the State Office. 
hn Matthews and Harold Witt represented Vo-Ag Service. Teacher Trainers in attendance 
re: Lloyd Phipps, Al Krebs, Paul Hemp, Gerald Fuller, J. R. Warmbrod, from the 
hversity of Illinois; Ralph Benton and Evigene Wood, from Southern Illinois University; and 
snneth James, of Illinois State. Jesse Keyser represented the IVA. James Guilinger, 
illiamsfield; Mel Nicol, Vice-President; Frank Young, Director, District IE; Clifford 
chta, Director, District I; and yours truly represented the IAVAT, Bob Howey serves as 
/ATA Treasurer and was re-elected for another year, 

Our hats are off to Al Krebs, the new president-elect of the Teacher Educator's 
iction of the Ag Division of AVA. Congratulations. 

Dr. Elizabeth Simpson, U. of I. , was elected Vice-President of AVA, in charge of 
>me Economics. 

Jesse Keyser was nominated for alternate Vice-President of Region IV of the NVATA 
ong with Glenn McDowell of Kentucky, who was elected to the post. Gerald Page, Nixa, 
issouri, succeeds Winfield Weaver, Delphi, Indiana, as Region IV Vice-President of NVATA. 

And, oh yes, we had three lovely ladies along, Jane Keyser, Virginia Sichta, and 
)ris Rice, who kept us on the straight and narrow. 

:CTION 23 NEWS AND VIEWS 



The highlight of the school year 1964-65 will no doubt be the Breakfast Meeting which 
2 had for our fall meeting. As a group of agriculture teachers we should set an example by 
lowing a lot of enthusiasm. 

Section 23 welcomes Dallas Lee who replaced Lee Riggs at Allendale. Riggs went 
ick to his home state of Indiana to teach. Section 23 found last year that when six of the 
xteen teachers were new in the section that some method of orientation is needed to ex- 
ain contest and other procedures to the new teachers in the section. Perhaps some other 
action has a system. 

EDS, January 1965 -2- 



The regional meeting to explain the new State Plan was attended by almost 100 per- 
cent of the teachers in the section . 

Section 23 is proud to have a former student, Tom Fisher, as the Illinois FFA 
President for 1964-65. 

Next year Section 23 will elect a better Public Relations Officer. 

G rover C. Burkett 

Sec. 23 Public Relations Officer 

OMISSIONS AND CORRECTIONS 

Ah, I have found a way to hear from the members of IAVAT; possibly rather 
devious, but effective--omit some pertinent information from the Newsletter. A complete 
and I hope authentic list of the state judging teams is as follows: 

Team School Teacher National Rating 

Livestock Shelbyville Kenneth Diehl Gold Emblem 

Meats Sterling Art Schick Gold Emblem 

Dairy Danvers Joe McGann Silver Emblem 

Dairy Products Bismarck Ronald Stickler Bronze Emblem 

Poultry & Eggs Fairview Charles Harn Honorable Mention 

Once again, we want to thank you men and your boys for so ably representing Illinois 
in these National contests and congratulations for your fine showing. 

WITH THE SICK 

Gale Gossett, Voc„ Agr„ Instructor at Princeton is in the Perry Memorial Hospital, 
Princeton, Illinois. Wouldn't it be wonderful therapy if he could receive a get -well card 
from over 400 Agr. Teachers? Let's try it, . . a card from each of us * 

SECTION 16 NEWS 

Section 16 is planning to hold a dinner meeting with wives as guests. 

The Voc, Agr. Fair was held at the Macon County Fair grounds in Decatur, August 
6. 169 boys, representing 18 schools, exhibited livestock, grain, poultry, rabbits, and 
garden produce. 

Section 16 started their parliamentary procedure contest at 4:30 p.m. with time out 
at 6:00 p.m. for a sack lunch. It was completed by 8:30 p.m, The teachers in Section 16 
appreciated very much the judging being done by teachers from surrounding sections. To 
reciprocate, some of the Section 16 teachers have helped judge contests for other sections. 

Leroy has a "200 Bushel Corn Club" organized and making satisfactory progress. 
Twenty -three attended the last meeting. A local fertilizer dealer has offered $1000. 00 in 
prize money for yields over 200 bushels. 



AIDS, January 1965 -3- 



;ivity 

fm Mgt. Course 

•ay Painting 

adership Train. School 

[1 Meeting (2 nights) 

id Judging contest 

;c. Wiring 

ri. Proc. contest 

ra & Soybean Prod. Show 

veying Kit School 



Place 


Date 




Attendance 


Maroa 






Well attended 


Mt. Zion 






Well attended 


Farmer City 






All schools 


Maroa 








Cerro Gordo 








Clinton 


Oct. 


1 


16 schools, Clinton winner 


Maroa 


Oct. 


6 


15 teachers 


Monticello 


Nov. 


19 




Blue Mound 


Nov. 


30 


10 schools, 139 entries 


Wapella 


Dec. 


5 





R. Donald Bateman 
Public Relations Officer 






[TORIAL - THE DROVERS JOURNAL. In case you missed this editorial in the JOURNAL 
I thought you might appreciate reading it. 

PORTUNITEES IN AGRICULTURE. 

More farmers' sons have followed in their father's footsteps than is true of any other 
upation, we read the other day. Of 2,069,000 men who were operating farms in March, 
2, about 85 per cent had fathers who were farmers, the Census Bureau found. No other 
upational group had as many as 30 per cent of the fathers in the same occupation as the 

[S. 

This certainly seems to say a great deal for farming as a way of life, It is regrettable 
t, because of the consolidations now going on in the field of agriculture, there will be fewer 
ms and farmers in the future, and therefore fewer chances for fathers to be succeeded by 
ir sons in actual farming. 

But all of us shoidd take note of the fact that this does not necessarily mean there will 
fewer opportunities in agriculture for the farm boys who want to stay in that field. 

Farming, we are reminded by agricultural leaders, is only one part of the American 
icultural complex which includes a great many occupations that require knowledge and 
ils in agricultural subjects. The broad field of agriculture includes production, servicing, 
cessing and marketing, notes A. W. TENNEY, director of the agricultural education 
inch of the U. S. Office of Education. Within these areas, there are many occupations 
t require knowledge of agriculture. People working in them can well be called "agricul- 
alists," even though the range of titles they have is a broad one. 

"Some may operate or work in greenhouses, care for a golf course, or manage a ranch 
t counts its size in square miles instead of acres. They may sell farm advertising, write 
ra news, represent a bank, sell fertilizer and seed, or teach vocational agriculture. Their 
nmon denominator is that the job they do requires a knowledge and skill in agricultural 
•jects," said Mr. TENNEY. 

"Farming and ranching are still promising and rewarding occupations. But agriculture 
nore than farming. While new opportunities on the farm may be declining, opportunities in 



)S, January 1965 



the broad field of agriculture are expanding as other industries and organizations develop to 
provide basic supplies and services to the farmer and to market his product. 

"Agriculture is the nation's most basic industry. Agriculture grows increasingly 
important as the populations of America, and of the world, continues to expand 

"In our high school program of vocational education, we see at least four groups 
of students whose future occupations will require knowledge and skill in agriculture: 

Those who plan to engage in production agriculture, farming and ranching, 

Those who will enter agricultural occupations directly from high school. 

Those who will obtain further technical training after high school in 

preparation for specific agricultural jobs. 

Those who will continue their education beyond high school for entry into 

the agricultural professions, 

"In each instance, opportunities are waiting, As in all occupations, opportunities 
will depend largely on the willingness to work and the level of education reached by the 
individual student. We encourage each student to continue education to the limit of his 
abilities and resources. 

"These will be the new agriculturalists. « , " 

THE STORY OF 100 MEN 

This is the story of 100 men at age 65 who set out at age 21 to seek their fortunes: 

1 was well-to-do ... 3 were comfortably situated , . 32 were self-supporting . , 
32 were poor ... 16 were destitute . , . 16 were dead. 

The 48 who ended up "poor" or "destitute" didn't plan to be failures they just 

failed to make and carry through, the right plan. 

I LAUGHED AT THIS ONE 

Two small boys were returning from Sunday School and were discussing the first 
lesson. 

"Do you believe all that stuff about the devil?" one asked the other. 

"No", he replied, "it's just like Santa Claus it's your old man". 



AIDS, January 1965 



(tear sheet) 



TO: Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 

Please send the following items: 

Price Total 

Number each* Amount Item 

60 Farm and Family Business Management 

Part III, Family Economics 
60 Farm and Family Business Management 

Part V, Financing the Farm Business 
160 Farm Business Adjustments for Improved Efficiency, 

Increased Income 

30 Michigan State Ext, Folder F-322, Interest Rate Calculator 

3£ Farm and Family Financial Budget Form 

2£ Farm and Family Financial Planning Problem 

3£ Our Net Worth Statement Form 

2£ Sheet: Costs of Alternative Corn Harvesting Methods 

(Lines and Columns are blank) 
30 Problem : How Much Capital is Needed to Change the 

Method of Harvesting Corn? (4-page leaflet) 
30 Michigan State Ext, Folder, F-320, Planning Family 

Insurance 
100 Cornell Ext, Bulletin 1002, Life Insurance for Farm 

Families 



Analysis Charts for Livestock 

Sample of Filled-In Analysis Chart for Hog Enterprise 
Standards for Measures of Efficiency 

*Prices do not include postage 

Name S choo 1 

Address 



(Pack of 14) 
10"? 


(Pack of 7) 
50 


50 



Billing 



AIDS, January 1965 



(tear sheet) 



TO: Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61803 

Please send the following items: 

Total 
Number Price* Amount 



$1. 


29 


$1. 


21 


$2 


58 


$2. 


82 


$2 


55 


$2, 


35 


$5 


00 



$2,00 

$2., 00 

$2,00 

$2.00 

$7.50 

*Prices do not include postage 

Name 



Item 



Slidefilms : 

166-64 - Selecting Breeding Hogs 

404-64 - Unpacking and Identifying Items in the 

Electric Wiring Box 
463 - The Power Grinder, How to Use it Safely (Color) 

465 - The Portable Electric Saw, How to Use it Safely (Color) 

708 - Soil Color (Color) 

7 91 - Identification of Weeds 

Set of 3 slidefilms on Arc Welding: 

450-64 Process, Equipment, and Safety (Color) 
451-64 Flat Position Welding (Color) 
452-64 Vertical, Overhead, and Horizontal Position 
Welding (Color) 

Grain Judging Samples : 

(Shipment to be made soon after January 15) 

Ring of corn (4 samples) 

Ring of oats (4 samples) 

Ring of soybeans (4 samples) 

Ring of wheat (4 samples) 

Complete set of four rings above 



School 



Address 



Billing_ 



AIDS, January 1965 



INDEX TO ITEMS IN VO-AG SERVICE SECTION 



Adult Class Assistance — Concrete ........... 

Analysis Charts for Livestock ............ 

Bulletins and Circulars 

Changes in State Judging Contests .......... 

Corn Subject -Matter Packets ............ 

Crop Varieties Recommended for Illinois ....... 

Farm Financial Management Materials ......... 

Illinois Custom Spray School ............. 

In-Service Courses Scheduled ............ 

Materials Available for Small Engines Work ...... 

New Slidefilms ................... 

Sample Grain Rings for Judging ........... 

Standards for Measures of Efficiency ......... 

Summer School Courses in Agriculture ........ 

The Farm Index .................. 

Tractor Safety Is No Accident ............ 

Winter Short Course at U. of I. February 1 to March 12 



Page 

No. 

1 

4 
4 
1 
2 
2 
3 
2 
2 
4 & 5 
3 
2 
3 
6 
4 
4 
3 



AIDS, January 1965 



! 



PRICE LIST OF FEEDS- 
December 15, 1964 



1/ 



The feed prices for many of the feedstuffs used in vocational agriculture projects are listed 
below. This list is meant to be used as a basis of values for all boys obtaining their feed at 
home All feed actually purchased should, of course, be recorded at prices paid 



Kind of feed 

Com, shelled, bu. 
Corn, ground shelled, bu. 
Corn, ground ear, bu. 
Oats, bu ..... . . 

Oats, ground, bu.. . . 

Barley, (feed) bu. 
Barley, ground or rolled, bu. 
Sorghum, grain, cwt 
Sorghum, grain, cracked, cwt. 
Garbage and kitchen waste, ton 
Skim and buttermilk, cwt 
Whole milk, Grade B, cwt 
Corn silage, ton . . . 

Sorghum silage, ton 
Grass silage, ton 

No preservative added . 

Preserved with 70-100 lb. 

Preserved with 
Clover and mixed hav ) 
Alfalfa " ) 

Timothy hay ) 

Oat straw or wheat straw 



December 15 



moiasscs 
150-200 lb ground corn 
All hay prices are . 
for baled hay and straws 
Loose hay $5 less per ton 



; 

: 

j 

■ 



1. 50 

3. 00 
10. 00 

9. on 

8 ,. 00 
9 i'i 
10 00 
25.00 
25 00 
22.00 
18 00 



- Prepared by W. W. Albert, Dept. of Animal Science, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 



AIDS, January 1965 



VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE SERVICE 

VMvanlry of HHnolt - Callage of Agriculture 

434 MUMFORD HAIL URBANA, ILLINOIS 






S5HU 



X L L 



ijtiwrsrty if Illinois 

FtB 18 Wbb 

LIBRARY 



VO-AG AIDS 



Volume 23 , Number 7 
February 1965 



U*u«d (olnHy by 
Vocational Agriculture Service, College of Agriculture 

and 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

in Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 



VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 



FFA ROADSIDE SIGNS . The program for reconditioning FFA roadside sign sets and 
providing some new sets is about read}- to go for this school year. We now have the 
decision on new and revised slogans and have received from Mr, G. Donavon CoiL 
Executive Secretary Illinois FFA, a list of 15 slogans that are to be used. Some of these 
are from the original series, some are slightly revised, and some are entirely new. 

We have a backlog list of FFA chapters that have applied for reconditioned and new sets of 
signs . These chapters which are listed below are being contacted directly and are assured 
of sets if they still want them . 

FFA Chapters Who Have Requested Reconditioned Sets of Roadside Signs -- 



Beason 
Beecher 
Bradford 
Bunker Hill 
Car rollton 
Ceri'o Gordo 
Co mell 
Forman (Manito) 



Heyworth 

Highland 

Leland 

Lincoln 

Manlius 

Mansfield 

Mt. Zion 



Mulberry Grove 

Murphy sboro 

Oblong 

Oneida 

Rossville 

St. Joseph 

Sullivan 



Tonica 

Tremont 

Triad 

Warren 

Washburn 

Williamsville 

Yorkwood 



FFA Chapters Who Have Requested New Sets of Roadside Signs — 

Bement Hopedale Pontiac Palmyra 

Blue Mound Knoxville Port Byron Pekin 

Brownstown Lewistown Atkinson Yates City 

Chrisman Okawville Elizabeth 

It appears at this time that funds appropriated by the Illinois Foundation FFA for this purpose 
should permit a few more chapters to be added to the list this year. Space is provided on a 
tear sheet near the end of this issue of the AIDS for your request. Mr, Coil suggests that 
you send in your request with next year in mind as well a,s this year, We can then take cair 
of as many as possible this year, using up all available funds, and then go to the Foundation 
Board of Trustees meeting in July with a proposal to take care of the remaining requests 
during 1965-66. 

JWM 



Ag ; Student Guest Day , Vo-Ag teachers in Ulinois have received a direct mail announce- 
ment about Ag Student Guest Day and Home Economics Hospitality Day which will be held 
on the University of Illinois campus on Saturday, March 6, 1965, This is to call your 
attention again to this date so you can make plans to attend with interested students and 
parents Those who come will have opportunity to learn about various courses of study 
in the College of Agriculture and about the many career opportunities open to them as 
graduates. More information, including a poster and program for the day, will be sent 
to you later. 

JWM 



AIDS, February 1965 



New Bulletins and Circulars , Foui new circulars have been received since the last issue 
of the AIDS, A single copy of each was included in February Agricultural Releases. Their 
titles and quantity prices for out-of-state distribution are: 

Circular 897 - Insect Control for Vegetable Crops, 5£ 

Circular 898 - Insect Control for Livestock and Livestock Barns, 3£ 

Circular 899 - Insect Control for Field Crops, 5£ 

Circular 900 - Insect Control for the Homeowner, 5£ 

JWM 

New Listing Cards, A packet containing 42 new listing cards describing new materials 
available from Vocational Agriculture Service has been sent to each teacher in Illinois . 
With the cards is a sheet of instructions on bringing your listing card file up-to-date as 
; of February 1, 1965. Our record of out-of-state teachers who have one of our listing 
card files is not accurate so no cards have been sent to this group. If you are in this 
group and wish to receive a set, we will send one to you without charge on request . Space 
has been provided on the tear sheet for you to request the new listing cards. 

JWM 

| New Order Forms . Two copies of each of five revised order forms are being sent to you 
i with this issue of the AIDS, They are for: Subject -Matter Units; Slidefilms; Crops, Soils 

and Fertilizer Materials; Agricultural Mechanics Materials; and Farm Management Ma- 
t terials. Please place these forms in your VAS Order File and discard old forms of the 
f. same titles. The form entitled "Composite Order Materials" should also be discarded as 

concrete kit items have been discontinued, and small engine and tractor maintenance items 

are listed on the new Agricultural Mechanics order form. These will be carried in stock 

in the future and can be ordered at any time. 

JWM 

\ Planning Your Farm Business . The new printing of these booklets has now arrived. No 
changes were made from the early printing but the old supply was exhausted. We have in- 
cluded this item on the tear sheet for your convenience in ordering, 

JHH 

I Income Tax Illustration Based on 1964 Farm Record Problem . This material was included 
in Ag. Releases and illustrates how to enter material from the Record Problem on income 
tax forms. Some teachers may want additional copies so they can hand them out to classes 
as they discuss the material,. We have duplicated about 400 extra copies and will sell them 
on a first-come, first-served basis a,t 10 cents per copy. 

JHH 

1964 Narrow Row Corn Yield Data^ We are sending in the February Agricultural Releases 
the 1964 corn yield results from Dr. J. Pendleton's narrow row corn experiments on the 
; Agronomy South Farm, This material will be included in future "Corn Packets.." Quantity 
copies are available on request from teachers who have previously purchased corn packets 
as long as the supply lasts. 

RLC 



AIDS, February 1965 



Spring Oats in Illinois for 1965 o This report was included in the February Agricultural 
Releases ; It includes the latest results from the agronomy research trials as well as 
yields from county demonstration plots. Quantity copies are available, but the supply is 
limited and will not be rerun. 

RLC 

Chicago Board of Trade Agricultural Writers Conference — 1964 . Through the thought- 
fulness of Mr, Irwin B, Johnson, Director of Public Information and Education at the 
Board of Trade, we are sending in the February Agricultural Releases a complimentary 
copy of the proceedings from this Agricultural Writers Conference, This volume can help 
supplement material on the use of the futures market from the country point of view, in- 
cluding its use in the business of farming. Additional copies are not available. 

RLC 

Sample Grain Rings for Judging, All orders for grain judging samples received to date 
have been filled and we have approximately 20 complete sets left* Orders for these sets 
are available at $7.50 plus postage, on a first -come, first-served basis- It is included 
on the tear sheet for your convenience. bt P 

Circular 856 (Supp.), 1965 Weed Control in Field Crops . This supplement gives the 

current herbicide recommendations. Quantity copies are available on request. A charge 

of 5 cents each is required for out-of-state orders. nT _ 

JttJ-iL/ 

Regional Soil Testing Meetings. These meetings are being scheduled to aid laboratories 
which are testing soils for fanners and should be of special interest to testing technicians 
and laboratory supervisors. The proposed program is as follows: Soil Testing Policies : 
Agronomy Department, Extension Service, and ASCS; Report on Check Sample Program ; 
Testing Techniques : Preparation of samples, soil acidity test, phosphorus test, potassium 
test ; Equipment ; Procedures ; and Trouble Shooting , 



Each meeting will begin at 1:00 p.m. 
tions are as follows: 



and will adjourn by 4.00 p.m. The dates and loca- 



Date 
February 9 

February 10 
February 11 
February 15 
February 18 
February 19 



Town 
Charleston 

Litchfield 

Benton 

Dwight 

Dixon 

Macomb 



Location 

( Dining Room A and B 

( Eastern Illinois University Union 

Gardens Restaurant 

Public Library 

V. F„Wo Hall 

Lincoln Manor Motel 
(Capitol Room 
(Western Illinois University Union 



The meeting will be conducted by personnel from the Agronomy Soil Testing Laboratory 
and Extension Service, Teachers who are interested are welcome to attend 

RLC 

Extramural Courses in Agriculture . We are including a separate sheet of information con- 
cerning extramural courses in agriculture with copies of the AIDS going to Illinois teachers. 
These are the courses to be offered during the second semester, 1964-65. This information 
was furnished by Dean Karl E. Gardner. TWM 



AEDS, February 1965 



Sh eep Day Presentations . A copy of the 1964 presentations is included in the February Agri- 
cultural Releases , If you do not subscribe to Releases or need another copy of the presentations, 
the Animal Science Department has a limited supply and can fill your request as long as the 
supply lasts, Order from Vocational Agriculture Service or direct from Animal Science „ 

WHW 

Dairy Calf Sale, The following information was furnished through the courtesy of Professor 
J„ G, Cash of the Department of Dairy Science: 

The Illinois Purebred Dairy Cattle Association will sponsor their 17th annual 
calf sale to be held in the Stock Pavilion at the University of Illinois on Saturday, 
February 27, 1965, As you know, only bona fide FFA and 4-H members are 
eligible to purchase the calves offered at this sale. 

A copy of the sale catalog will be sent to each vocational agriculture instructor 
as soon as they are off the press This should be about February 15, Those 
desiring additional copies of the catalog can obtain them by writing me. 

JGC/WHW 

Winter Short Course . As of January 20 there were 122 applications for the Winter Short 
Course in Agriculture at the University of Illinois to be held from February 1 through 
March 12, 1965, The following table gives the enrollment for each short course since the 
program was started in 1951: 

1964 - 139 1957 - 83 

1963 - 155 1956 - 103 

1962 - 108 1955 - 105 

1961 - 103 1954 - 104 

1960 - 84 1953 - 78 

1959 - 75 1951-52 - 112 

1958 - 83 
Ten students attended the 1964 short course using Illinois Foundation FFA scholarships. 
Fifty -four other scholarships were provided by 48 Illinois banks, RFE 

NEW BOOKS 



The following have been added to our book display in 434 
Mumford Hall since the last issue of the AIDS. All books 
in the display have been furnished by the publishers and 
are available for your review and examination at any time. 



FARM POWER AND MACHINERY MANAGEMENT 1964, Donnell R. Hunt, The Iowa 
State University Press, Ames, Iowa $4,50, 

The following is extracted from the publisher's statement: 

"The la,test findings concerning the profitable and efficient use of farm machinery 
are contained in FARM POWER AND MACHINERY MANAGEMENT, 4th edition . 
Written by Donnell Hunt, Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering at the 
University of Illinois, the book combines basic engineering principles with the 
fundamentals of farm machinery operation It is designed as a laboratory manual 
and workbook for students of vocational agriculture and agricultural engineering. 

Recent machinery management developments have been incorporated into this 
4th edition, and all sections have been revised and updated. New material 
includes factors affecting performance capabilities of tractors and implements, 
descriptions of methods for obtaining optimum economic performance from farm 
machines, equations to determine implement size, equipment cost accounting 
methods, descriptions of new farm practices, and recently formulated data on 
machinery management," 

AIDS, February 1965 -4- 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATIO! 






DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION / COLLEGE OF EDUCATION /UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Placement Report , At the present tinae one vocational agriculture position is open for the 
second semester, 1964-65, Two vacancies, effective July 1, 1965, have been listed with 
the Educational Placement Office as of January 18. „„„ 

University of Illinois Graduate Assistantships in Agricultural Education . The University 
of Dlinois Agricultural Education Division will have graduate assistantships available for 
1965-66. In awarding these assistantships, preference will be given, other factors being 
equal, to persons desiring to work toward aDoctor's degree or an Advanced Certificate in 
Education degree. Duties will include assisting with research projects. 

Graduate assistants with a quarter-time appointment may enroll for a full load of course 
work. Graduate assistants with a half-time appointment may enroll for three-fourths of a 
full load of course work. A person with a half-time assistantship may complete a full 
academic year of work in two semesters, plus the preceding or following eight -week summer 
session. 

Nine-month graduate assistants receive free tuition and fees for both semesters, plus the 
following summer session. They receive a salary of $261 per month for half-time work 
if they are candidates for doctoral degrees, and $250 per month for half-time work if 
candidates for Master's or Advanced Certificate degrees. 

Applicants should have a Bachelor's degree and be qualified to teach vocational agriculture. 
Interested persons should obtain application forms from Lloyd J Phipps, University of 
Illinois, Agricultural Education Division, 357 A Education Building, Urbana, Illinois . 

LJP 



Agricultural Education Summer Session Courses. The following agricultural education 
courses will be offered the first four weeks of the summer session at the University of 
Illinois, June 20 - July 16. All of these courses will focus on the replanning of agricul- 
tural education to implement the broadened objectives of vocational agriculture. 



Course 

Votec 472, High School Program 
and Teaching Methods 

Votec 474, Supervised Agriculture 

Experience Programs 
(This is the course that assists teachers to 
qualify to offer coop, programs in agriculture.) 



Unit 
Credit 



Time 



1-3 TWTF 



Instructor 



Fuller 



10-12 TWTF Warmbrod 



AIDS, February 1965 





















. 



(cont , ] 



Course 



Votec 475, Organizing and Teaching 
Agriculture Mechanics 

Votec 459, Workshop in Agriculture 

Education (Enrollment limited to persons 
with Master's degree or equivalent ) 



Unit 
Credit 


Time 


Instructor 


1 

2 


8-10 TWTF 


Phipps 


4-i 


3-5 TWTF 


Phipps, Hemp. 

Fuller, 

Warmbrod 



LJP 

Vocational Agriculture Students Interested in Teaching . We appreciate the response to our 
annual request for the names and addresses of young men whom you would recommend to us 
as prospective teachers of agriculture The need for an adequate supply of good teachers is 
as acute as it has ever been. The expansion of programs of vocational agriculture in line 
with recent federal legislation is partially dependent on providing enough teachers both to fill 
vacancies and new positions. 

We again would like to receive from you the names and addresses of senior students you would 
recommend. Please use the following form. Send it to the Division of Agricultural Education. 
357 Education Building, University of Illinois, Urbana. 



Names of Seniors: 



Addresses: 



(Signed) 

Address 
School 



Vocational Agriculture Teacher 



AHK 



AIDS, February 1965 



ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRIC 

NORMAL, ILLINOIS 61761 




AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



Cooperative Teacher Conference The Cooperating Teachers Conference in Agricultural 

Education for the schools participating in the student teaching program at Illinois State 

University for the first semester met on campus January 26, 1965. Cooperating teachers 

participating are: Arthur Phillips, Eureka; Howard Cotter, Flanagan; John Olson, Kirkland; 

Melvin Nicol, Maroa; E L Rice, Princeville; Donald Higgs, Streator; Charles L Schettler, 

Wapella; Frank Young, Washington; James Guilinger, Williamsfield 

K.EJ 



Teacher Replacement Report Nine men from Illinois State University are completing 
requirements for graduation and certification for vocational agriculture teaching at the 
close of the first semester Three men have accepted vocational agriculture positions 
beginning February 1, 1965 The men, position, home high school and their agriculture 
teacher in high school are as follows: 



Name 
Jack Niles 

Ed Stokes 
James Winslow 



Position 
Shabbona 

Griggsville 
Minooka 



Home High 
School 

Somonauk 

El Paso 
Fairbury 



Their Agriculture 
Teacher in H.S. 

Stanley Magnuson 
Wilbur Hancock 
Ernest Sancken 
Warren K. Wessels 



As of January 15, four men are available for teaching positions and hope to start teaching 
vocational agriculture 

As of January 15, there were no vacancies listed for vocational agriculture by the Bureau 

of Appointments at Illinois State University. 

KEJ 




IAVAT 



NEWS 



ILLINOIS ASSN. OF VO-AG TEACHERS 



IVA CONVENTION 

Vice-president Mel Nicol has prepared a program for the agricultural section I'm 
sure many of you will want to attend. The program is as follows: 

Friday, February 26, 1965 
Pere Marquette Hotel, Peoria Illinois 



9:30 A.M. 
10:00 A.M. 

10:30 A.M. 

11:00 A.M. 

11:50 A.M. 
1:30 P.M. 



8:00 A,M. 



Coffee & Donuts, courtesy of Cargill, Inc. 

Announcements and Reports from: State Office; Vo-Ag Service; 
Div, of Agr. Educ. at U. of I. , I.S.U., and S.I. U. 

"The Present Status of the New Voc. Educ. Act" 

Mr. Ralph A. Guthrie, Chief, Agr. Educ, Springfield. 

"Finance in Farm Management" 

Mr. Frank Green, Commercial National Bank, Peoria, 111. 



Adjourn for lunch. 

Tour of Nutrena Mills; Bus provided by Nutrena Co. 
1:30 p.m. 

Host - Frank Young, Voc, Agr. Instructor, Washington 
Recorder - Wm. H. Dowell, Voc. Agr. Instructor, Pekin 
Chairman -M. J. Nicol, Voc, Agr,. Instructor, Maroa 

Saturday. February 27 , 1965 
Executive Committee Meeting 



to leave the hotel 



jfc 5j^^c^::J:^ 



Attention All Conventioneers.'! I 



Be sure you visit the Commercial Exhibits and let them know you are Ag teachers. 
The convention expenses are paid in large part by these exhibitors. Your IAVAT benefits 
from your participation, so plan now to spend the day Friday, February 26, at the IVA 
Convention. A complete IVA program will be in the February issue of ILLINOIS VOCA- 
TIONAL PROGRESS magazine. 

AIDS, February 1965 



IAVAT Committee Reports . 

These reports should be sent to M. J . Nicol, Vice-President of IAVAT, Maroa, 
Illinois not later than April 1, 1965 . And earlier if possible. 

"30-M1NUTE CLUB" 

As of January 15, 1965 I know of the following members that are eligible to receive 
"30-Minute Club" cards at the June Conference. I'm sure this list is not complete so I ask 
you to please inform me if your name should be added to the list. 

"Here by the Owl" - G. O. Irvine, Tonica, 111. -Aug. & Sept. , 1964, 
THE NATIONAL FUTURE FARMER 

"State Reimbursement Policies for Vocational Education in Agriculture" - J, R. Warmbrod, 
Urbana, 111. -July, 1964, AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

"The FFA on Trial" - Alfred Krebs, Urbana, 111. - Oct. , 1964 - AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

"Letter to the Editor" - Harold Engelking, Springfield, 111. - Aug. , 1964 - 
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

"Letter to the Editor" - Lloyd J. Phipps, Urbana, 111. - Sept. , 1964 - 
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Picture - E. L. Rice, Princeville, 111., Nov. 1964 -AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

'Guidelines for Teaching OFAO" - Gerald R. Fuller, Urbana, 111. -Jan., 1965 - 
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

"Rank in High School Class Predicts College Success at Southern Illinois University" - 
Ralph A. Benton, Carbondale, 111. -Oct., 1964 - AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

P-L-E-A-S-E, the ONLY way I can know if you are eligible is for you to let me know. 

;fc ^c ;fc sf: ^c $ 

Report of NVATA & AVA Convention . 

Report on the Program of the National Vocational Agricultural Teacher's Association 
and the Agricultural section of the American Vocational Association at the 58th Annual Con- 
vention of the American Vocational Association. Minneapolis. Minnesota. 

Saturday morning, December 5th, I attended the first general session of the NVATA, 
featuring officer reports, announcements and a report of the nominating committee. 

The Saturday afternoon session opened with a panel discussion on "What agri-business 
expects from the program in vocational agriculture, " The same afternoon I attended a meet- 
ing of the Region IV, NVATA, and heard reports on activities of the various state associations. 

Saturday evening, Doc Rice and 1 attended a dinner meeting sponsored by Swift and 
Company. At dinner, reports were given by representatives from the various states on 
activities in their state under the new Vocational Education Act of 1963. 

Sunday morning I attended a breakfast sponsored for our group by A. O, Smith 
Harvestore Products, Inc. The program they presented was on handling farmyard manure 

Sunday afternoon I attended the second general session of NVATA, listening to ma 
reports. I also attended a meeting for presidents and vice-presidents of Regions IV, V, VI. 
Problems of the various state associations were discussed here. 

(cont.) 
AIDS, February 1965 -2- 



(cont.) 

Monday morning opened with the second regional meeting. Each state presented a 
list of their association activities, 

Monday afternoon 1 attended a meeting of combined agricultural education groups and 
heard a panel discussion "Opportunities for Agricultural Education," This panel presented 
some fine speake i 

Monday evening 1 attended the first general session of AVA. I heard a talk bj Carl D, 
Perkins, Congressman from Kentucky and author of the Perkins BilL Senator Perkins 
promised that federal aid to education would take high priority with the new Congress 

Tuesday morning I attended a breakfast sponsored by the Minnesota Association of 
Cooperatives, with a program on various cooperatives following. The same morning I 
attended a business meeting of the combined Agricultural Education groups and also a 
session where we heard speakers talk on "Young Farmer Opportunity Committees," They 
told about young farmer activities in Minnesota and Nebraska, 

On Tuesday afternoon I visited commercial exhibits. 

Tuesday evening the second general AVA session was held, with the main speaker 
being Donald M. Frazer, Congressman from Minnesota. Awards were presented by AVA 
at this session. 

I left Minneapolis on Wednesday morning and am indebted to James Guilinger for a 
report on the rest of the convention. 

The group attended an awards breakfast on Wednesday morning sponsored by Allis- 
Chalmers Manufacturing Company. The same morning they also attended the final NVATA 
general session. 

Wednesday noon the group were guests of International Harvester at a luncheon, 
Wednesday afternoon the meeting for combined agricultural education groups featured a 
speaker on the topic "Agriculture Related Occupations, What the Studies Show" and a 
symposium on "Whither the FFA?" 

The Thursday morning session for Vocational Agriculture and Vocational Guidance 
teachers featured the topic: "The Expectancy of High School Graduates by Industry." 
Other topics were "Agriculture Education, an Opportunity for Those in Industry" and 
"Agriculture Teaching, a Challenge to Our Students." 

The combined Agricultural Education groups met Thursday afternoon for a business 
meeting and the AVA House of Delegates also met the same afternoon, 

The AVA banquet and ship program was held Thursday evening, concluding the con- 
vention , 

Mr. Guilinger reports that the NFA will be incorporated into the FFA at the 1965 
FFA Convention. He also reports that according to A. W. Tenney some changes in FFA 
must occur in the next few years. They are as follows: 
1 Possible name change 

2, Incorporating girls into FFA 

3 , Creed changes 

4, Adding of additional degrees 

5, Change in the FFA jacket, to offer something more 
appropriate for formal wear 

Space is too limited for me to report on all business and activities at the convention. 
A busy schedule and worthwhile programs were in store for all,. I hope each member of 
our association will have the pleasure of sometime attending a national convention. 

AIDS, February 1965 ***3*-** Melvin J. Nicol 



Frank Young's Comments on the NVATA & A.VA Convention . 

It was indeed an interesting experience to attend the 58th Annual AVA Convention held 
■it Minneapolis in earlj December. The N\ ATA Convention program was interesting and 
well planned consisting of General Sessions; Special Programs, including panels; Regional 
Meetings and NVATA Group Meetings 1 concluded after hearing reports from the Region IV 
state presidents which included Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan Missouri, and Ohio 
that we are very fortunate 5 in Illinois, in having the many fine aids and services available 
to us from Vocational Agriculture Service and the assistance and cooperation of the State 
Office and Agricultural Education Departments 

In all, it was certainly a valuable experience. Our national officers are very capable, 
and dedicated to the ideals of our ag teaching profession, 

SECTION 8 NEWS 

"Don't move or say anything and maybe they'll go away (or not come up again)", is 
the easy way to solve problems that arise. Not so with difficulties and problems with the 
Section and State events in Section 8. Under the hard driving leadership of our chairman, 
Ron Seibel, section teachers met in committees for all the major events, past and future, 
with the purpose of critical examination and making recommendations. 

Late in the fall a regular Section Dinner meeting of all teachers was called. Along 
with the regular business, the above committee reports were heard and discussed, followed 
by appropriate action. Besides getting the rules and regulations up-dated, the new teachers 
in the section received a briefing on operational procedures which was helpful to them, We 
recommend a similar practice for any section. 

The Leadership Officers Training School was held September 16 at Lockport — 100% 
attendance. The Parliamentary Procedure contest was held October 29, at Oswego, which 
ended in a tie between Minooka and Dwight, The Grain and Poultry Show was held at Yorkville, 
on November 7, 14 of our 15 schools had entries in this event. Nine chapters had representa- 
tion at the National FFA Convention and one member, Steve Ament of Yorkville, played in the 

National Band, A . . „. ,. 

Marion Welles 

Public Relations Officer 

SECTION 5 NEWS 

The new Education Bill has opened the door to many changes in Voc, Agr Changes 
should be made with full knowledge of all facts, 

The teachers of Section 5 want to implement the new program to its best advantage. 
Result: they called a meeting of all teachers in Section 5, 7:00 to 9:00 PM, January 20, 1965 
at Roanoke Dr. A, H, Krebs and Mr. George Richter presented a program planned around 
two questions: What steps should be taken in Section 5 to meet the needs of this area, and 
secondly, what things should we do in order to keep well oriented with the overall State 
Program? This was followed by a question period. 

The role vocational agriculture will play in providing a trained and specialized labor 
force will be determined by the actions of today. This meeting is just one step in getting a 
sound foundation set for future development. There is a place for this type of meeting in 

AIDS, February 1965 -4- 



(cont , ) 

every section of the state. We have all attended the area meetings and received ideas of 
what can be done, Now let us meet on the sectional level and get the new program instituted 
at the grass roots. We, the teachers, hold the future of vocational agriculture in our hands. 
Let us not fail. Let us maintain our position of leadership in the rural community. 

Section 5 had nine boys attending the Farm Bureau -FFA Program at Illinois State 
University during Christmas vacation. The boys enjoyed their program and were happy 
to receive information pointing out some concepts of agricultural business and our American 
heritage. 

Tom Fitz simmons 
****** Public Relations Officer 



AWARDS 

Are there any additions or deletions from this list? 
unless I hear from you by February 15th. 



I will assume this list is correct 



10-Year 



Henry Slinker, Altamont 
Fred Bergman, Bath 
Albert Tieken, Dixon 
Carl L. Growler, Effingham 
Harry White, Fairbury (9.5) 
Stephen Kingry, Farmington 
Jerry Kuykendall , Findlay (9, 



5) 



20 -Year 



Curtiss Sherman, Camp Point 
Wilbur Liehr, Galva (19.5) 
William J. Brinkley, McLeansboro 
Vernon V. Luther, Neponset 



Leland Ashby, Gillespie 
Sanford Hutchison, Greenfield 
Maurice Thomas, Lovington 
Robert Milligan, Mascoutah 
Phillip Brown, Poplar Grove 
Gordon Adamson, Winchester 
Ronald Smith, West Frankfort 



Royal McCormick, Rock Falls 
Kenneth Poole, Salem 
Paul Nicely, Tampico (19.5) 
Jack F. Shetler, Vienna 



George A. Richter, State Supervisor (19.5) 



Robert R. Van Rheeden, New Lenox 

Ernest R. Lamkey, Oakland 

Robeit L. Rohlfing, Paxton 

E. A„ Crump, Potomac 

John E„ Shields, Jr., Shannon 



25 -Year 
F. A. S chape r, Aledo 
Glen E,. Diamond, Carbondale (24. 5) 
Stanley Klaus , Carlinville 
Orville Bottrell, Crete 
Max Kuster, Joliet 

Ralph A. Guthrie, Chief 

L. J. Phipps, Professor and Chairman 

30-Year 
O, M. Brewer, Atwood Louis Templeton, Pinckneyville 

C. No DeHart, Greenview D, A. Parish, Stillm an Valley 

Harold W. Homann, State Supervisor 

J. W. Matthews, Professor 

Harold Witt, Associate Professor 



P. H. Daigh, Lebanon 

M. L. Lindsay, Prophetstown 



3 5 -Year 






Duane Gregory, Sherrard 



AIDS, February 1965 



-5- 



I Laughed at this On e 

This is a. weird story of the la.si. man on earth, after the H-bomb had destroyed the 
world, Alive only by a miracle, this distraught survivor looked down from an upper floor 
of the Empire State Building on total devastation as far as the eye could see 

Engulfed in a feeling of abysmal loneliness, he decided he could not bear to be the only 
person alive so he jumped* 

His body hurtled down, story after story „ 

As he passed the 13th floor, he heard a phone ringing'. 



Tear Sheet 



"O: Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61803 

I would like to apply for a set of FFA Roadside Signs: 

To be reconditioned j A new set | | 

Remarks: 



Teacher 



School 



Please send the following: 

Total 
Number Price* Amount 



no charge 
25<? 
IOC 



$7.50 



Item 

Set of new listing cards 

Planning Your Farm Business 

Income Tax Illustration Based on 1964 Farm Record Problem 

Set of Sample Grain Rings for Judging - 4 rings of 4 samples 
each of corn, oats, soybeans, and wheat, with placings 
and reasons . 



* Prices do not include postage. 



Name 



School 



Address 



Billing 



AIDS, February 1965 



INDEX TO ITEMS IN VO-AG SERVICE SECTION 

Page 

Ag. Student Guest Day 1 

Chicago Board of Trade Agricultural Writers' Conference 3 

Circular 856 (Supplement) 2 

Dairy Calf Sale , 4 

Extramural Courses in Agriculture 3 

FFA Roadside Signs. . 1 

Income Tax Illustration .. 2 

New Books 4 

New Bulletins and Circulars. . 2 

New Listing Cards , . 2 

New Order Forms 2 

1964 Narrow Row Corn Yield Data 2 

Planning Your Farm Business 2 

Regional Soil Testing Meetings 3 

Sample Grain Rings for Judging 3 

Sheep Day Presentations 4 

Spring Oats in Illinois for 1965 3 

Winter Short Course 4 



ADDS, February 1965 



PRICE LIST OF FEEDS 

January 20, 1965 

The feed prices for many of the feedstuff s used in vocational agriculture projects are listed 

below. This list is meant to be used as a basis of values for all boys obtaining their feed at 
home. All feed actually purchased should, of course, be recorded at prices paid. 

Kind of feed January 20 

Corn, shelled, bu. . . . . . $ 1.16 

Corn, ground shelled, bu. .................. 1.26 

Corn, ground ear, bu.. . . . . .................... 1.26 

Oats, bu ,. .68 

Oats, ground, bu.. .78 

Barley, (feed) bu.. 1.11 

Barley, ground or rolled, bu. ...................... 1.21 

Sorghum, grain, cwt. , 2.09 

Sorghum, grain, cracked, cwt,. ..................... 2.19 

Garbage and kitchen waste , ton. . 8.50 

Skim and buttermilk, cwt. 1.50 

Whole milk, Grade B, cwt. 3.00 

Corn silage, ton 10.00 

Sorghum silage, ton. 9.00 

Grass silage, ton . 

No preservative added ....................... 8.00 

Preserved with 70-100 lb. molasses. ........... ., . , . . 9.00 

Preserved with 150-200 lb. ground com 10.00 

Clover and mixed hay) All hay prices are ...... . 26.00 

Alfalfa ) for baled hay and straws ............. 26.00 

Timothy hay ) Loose hay $5 less per ton 24.00 

Oat straw or wheat straw . 18.00 



AIDS, February 1965 






VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE SERVICE 

Unlvaralry »t Minors ■ Col!*a* of Agriculture 

434 MUMFORD HALL • URBANA, ILLINOIS 



VO-AG AIDS 



Volume 23, Number 8 
March 1965 



Usuod jointly by 
Vocational Agriculture Service, College of Agriculture 

and 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

In Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 



■H. M 



.,., 



1965-1966 ORDER FORM 

Deadline 
OCT. 1, 1965 

0: Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
University of Illinois 

Urbana, Illinois 1 , 

] Agricultural Releases for 1965-66- 

— i 2/ 

Advance Order for Slidefilms 1965-66^ 



Number of Sets New Subject Matter Units to be 

released 1965-663/ 

Send items to: 



Charges for items should be billed to: 



Signature 



Agricultural Releases 

a. Agricultural Releases will include multiliths, mimeographs, and printed releases primarily from the College of Agriculture that Voca- 
tional Agriculture Service can obtain and that seem to be of concern to teachers. 

b. Agricultural Releases will be issued monthly from October to May, inclusive. 

c The subscription charge for 7 965-66 Agricultural Releases will be determined by the costs of releases to Vo-Ag Service, but will not 
exceed $15.00 plus postage. 

a. Charges for Agricultural Releases will be accumulated and a statement sent after the last (May) issue. 
e. Deadline date for accepting Agricultural Release orders is October 7, 7965. 

Advance Orders for Slidefilms 

o. 7ms is an order for a print of each si idefilm prepared and released by Vo-Ag Service during the schoo/ year 7965-66. 
0. Advance or', rs for slidefilms will be allowed a 30% discount from the regular price of the films. 

c. Total cost or discounted prints sent in J965-66 will not exceed $25.00, plus postage. 

d. Billing for slidefilms sent on advanced order will be deferred until after the last print has been sent. 
«• The deadline date for accepting advanced orders for slidefilms is October 1, 7965. 

3/ 

o. A set of subject-matter units on advance order consists of one copy of each unit released by Vo-Ag Service during the 7 965-66 school 
year. 

b. The charge for advance order units will be 2/34 per page but the total cost per set will not exceed $1.25, plus postage. 
c Billing for advance order units will be deferred until all shipments have been made. 

d. The deadline date for accepting advance orders for units is October 1, 7 965. 



town 












qfiw; 


IE USE ONLY 
SCHOOL 






Att RFT.FASKS 


UNITS 


SLIDEFIL] 


)ct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


TOTAL 












































































OPEN ACCOUNT CHARGES 


DATE 


ITEM 


CHARGE 


POST 


TO! 
















































































































































































































































































































VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 



Agricultural Releases, etc . A copy of the order form for 1965-66 Agricultural Releases 
and advance order for new units and slidefilms is enclosed in this issue of the AIDS, The 
Vo-Ag Service advisory board recommended that this form be sent now for the benefit of 
schools who must make budget requests for next year in the near future. Orders may be 
placed any time between now and October 1 but we will be glad to receive them as soon as 
possible. 

JWM 

Moormans Scholarship Program . Enclosed in this copy of the AIDS is a brochure about 
the scholarships offered by the Moorman Company to students in agriculture at the 
University of Illinois and other land-grant colleges. This was furnished by Dean C. D. 
Smith. It is not too soon for prospective students to make application for this or other 
scholarships that are available. 

JWM 

Agriculture Student Guest Day March 6 . Plans are complete for Agriculture Student Guest 
Day at the University of Illinois on Saturday, March 6. Bring your group to the University 
Auditorium in time to register before the program begins at 9:00 a.m. Parking will be 
available in the College of Agriculture parking lots on the south campus. 

JWM 

New Bulletins and Circulars . Publications received since the last issue of the AIDS include: 
BuL 704 - bisect Infestation of Corn Roots in Illinois 

Bui. 705 - Is State Control of Consumer Milk Prices in the Public Interest? 
Cir„ 896 - Your Family and Economic Security 
Cir. 903 - Performance of Commercial Corn Hybrids in Illinois, 1962-64 

A single copy of each of these, except Bui. 704, is included in March Agricultural Releases. 
Because of its technical nature, Bui. 704 was not included but a single copy is available 
to anyone interested. Prices for quantity copies for out-of-state distribution are: 
Bui. 705, 15£; Cir. 896, 15£; Cir, 903, 10£. 

JWM 

Correction - Small Engines Information. The following information was sent to us from 
Illinois Auto Electric Company, 2001-37 Indiana Avenue , Chicago, 60616, regarding 
availability of Clinton engines and instructional materials. This is a revision of the infor- 
mation contained in the January AIDS. 

"The Clinton Engines Corporation offers new engines only at 50% discount 
from its list price for school training purposes. 

The company also furnishes one Service Clinic manual for each engine 
ordered. Additional manuals may be purchased through our firm at a cost 
of $1.00 each. 

"Invoicing will be through the Central Warehouse Distributor handling your 
engine request. However, a $10.00 courtesy cash rebate will be made, on 
first engine only, by Clinton directly to the school upon receipt of acknowledge- 
ment of the Clinton material and reference to the assisting Clinton Central 
Warehouse in either a regular school publication or local newspaper." 

If interested, write to the above address for their form No.. 1357. JWM 

AIDS, March 1965 -1- 



In-Service Courses Scheduled. , The following non-credit, in-service course has been scheduled. 
Teachers in Section 18 will be notified directly but there may be teachers in nearby sections who 
would like to attend. If you are in this category, please let us know if you wish to attend so we 
can plan for you and send you last minute details. 

Tuesday, April 13 - Electrical Controls - Jamaica (Sidell), Section 18 - 4:30 p.m. 

RFE 

Summary of Presentations: Seventeenth Illinois Custom Spray Operators' Training School . 
The custom spray manuals contain 39 presentations on current weed, insect, and disease 
problems. A single copy was included in the March Agricultural Releases. Additional cop- 
ies are $1.00 each, and may be ordered from the Entomology Extension Office, 280 Natural 
Resources, or from our office. It is included on the tear sheet for your convenience. 

RLC 

Sheep Shearing Schools. G. R. Carlisle of the animal science extension staff has given us the 
following information: 

Sheep shearing schools this year will be held as follows: March 15 and 16 at 
University of Illinois; March 18 and 19 at Lee County 4-H Center, Amboy; 
March 24 and 25 at Dixon Springs Agricultural Center, Simpson; and March 31 
and April 1 at Fulton County. 

We will try to limit the school to older high school boys that are large enough 
to handle mature sheep and have sheep projects and to out -of -school boys who 
own sheep flocks and will have a chance to shear sheep after the school. En- 
rollment fee will be the usual $2.50 per boy, $2.00 of which will be refunded 
to all boys who stay for the two days of the school. The enrollment fee check 
should be made payable to the Sheep Shearing Fund . Since we always have 
more enrollments than we are able to accept, we will take enrollments on a 
first -come first-served basis, but will not accept an enrollment unless the fee 
accompanies the letter. We are asking each school to limit its enrollment to 
two. 

Send enrollments direct to Livestock Extension Specialists, Animal Science 
Department, Urbana, 111. , with a copy to your farm adviser. Be sure to 
designate which school you wish to attend. 

We will furnish all equipment. Each boy should bring work clothes and shoes. 
Each school will start at 9:00 a.m. on the first day and end at 3:00 p.m. on 
the following day. 

We do not want boys who have been to the school before to return as regular 
students. If such boys want to be checked out, they can return for the second 
day of the school, if they bring their own equipment. They do not need to 
enroll in advance. 

GRC/WHW 

Feed Tag Analysis.. This is a 5-page multilith explaining the information given on feed tags. 
The main object of the leaflet is to get feed buyers to read feed tags and better understand them. 

While the leaflet was prepared by the extension staff of the Animal Science Dept. , Vocational 
Agriculture Service has permission to reproduce and distribute it. If you desire copies, other 
than the one included in Agr. Releases, you may use the tear sheet in the back of the AIDS. 
Additional copies are 3 cents each, plus postage. 

WHW 

AIDS, March 1965 -2- 



New Scrambled Books. Four new scrambled books were included in the March Agricultural 
Releases. The title and price of each is as follows: 

No. 105 Making the Butterfat Test (10£) 

No. 402 Producing Oats (10£) 

No. 502 Subsidiary Motions — Parliamentary Procedure No. 2 (15£) 

No. 503 Incidental Motions — Parliamentary Procedure No, 3 (10£) 

These, like the previous scrambled books, are each based on a subject matter unit or the 
Guide to Parliamentary Practices and may be used to supplement the basic material. If 
you wish to order quantity copies, these are listed on the attached tear sheet. 

WHW 

1965 Beef Cattle Management Suggestions , is a revision of the 1964 version that was printed 
last spring. A copy of the booklet is included in the March Agricultural Releases. Addi- 
tional copies may be obtained as long as the supply lasts. 

Other booklets of this series are beef feeding suggestions and swine feeding and managing 
suggestions . These will be included in the April Agricultural Releases but are not ready 
at this time. They will also be available in quantities when they are announced. 

WHW 

Book Display and List Revision . The Vo-Ag Service book display is being brought up-to- 
date as is customary every two years. Each publisher is being contacted to be sure that 
we display only the latest editions and that information concerning price, etc. , is correct. 
Many new and revised books are being added and a new book list will be prepared to be 
included in the May Agricultural Releases. In the meantime we will not list the new books 
in the AIDS as they are received because of the large number involved. 

JWM 

Swine Day, University of Illinois , will be held March 23 at the University Auditorium. The 
morning session includes reports by the swine division staff on levels of feed for gestating 
sows and gilts on pasture, antibiotic and stress factors for growing -fattening pigs, manage- 
ment factors for growing-fattening pigs, comparison of anemic preventatives, gases and 
odors in confinement swine buildings, and TGE research and prospects for a vaccine. The 
afternoon session includes presentations by Professor Simerl of the Agricultural Economics 
Department; Gordon Sears, First National Bank, Princeton; and Albert Gehlbach, a swine 
producer, Lincoln. 

Within the next couple of weeks, a copy of the completed program will be sent to all voca- 
tional agriculture teachers in Illinois. All teachers and/or students are welcome to attend. 

DEB/WHW 



AIDS, March 1965 -3- 



IE 



]D 




AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION / COLLEGE OF EDUCATION / UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Agricultural Education Extramural Offering . In the regular rotation among the districts 
of the state, an agricultural education extramural course will be offered in District HI, 
Sections 11-15, in the fall semester of 1965-66. The course ordinarily taught extramurally 
for experienced teachers has been Votec 477. However, because of the interest in preparing 
boys and girls for work in agriculturally oriented firms, involving cooperative agricultural 
experience programs, Votec 474 will be offered instead of Votec 477. Votec 474, Supervised 
Agriculture Experience Programs, fulfills one of the teacher education requirements for 
conducting cooperative experience programs in agriculture. 

It is not too early to begin planning to enroll in Votec 474. 

LJP 

Teacher Placement at the Postsecondary Level. Vocational agriculture programs at the 
postsecondary level are being developed in Illinois and other states. In the years ahead 
there will be positions open for teachers of vocational agriculture with special qualifica- 
tions. Junior colleges and area schools will be searching for qualified teachers in orna- 
mental horticulture, postsecondary agricultural mechanics, and agricultural supply 
occupations. In general, teachers will need the Master's degree or Advanced Certificate 
plus five years of successful teaching experience to be considered seriously for these 
positions.. 

Teachers who have experience or special training and interest in any one of the three areas 
mentioned above should write Dr. Paul Hemp, 358 Education Building, and describe their 
special qualifications and goals. From these replies a list of candidates for postsecondary 
positions can be developed. Teachers who expect to search actively for positions during 
the coming months should also activate their credentials in the Educational Placement 
Office . 

PEH 



Campus Graduate Course. This semester Dr. Paul 
Votec 47 4, Supervised Agriculture Experience Prog 
twenty-two. The following teachers are enrolled: 

NAME 

R. Donald Bateman 

Joseph Berger 

Maynard Boudreau 

Oscar Brewer 

Gene Buhrmester 

E. A. Crump 

Dale Fathauer 

Lawrence Gregory 

Lowell Hillen 

Kenneth Knell 

James Leming 
Russell Lewey 
Donald Prather 
Donald Rodgers 
AIDS, March 1965 



Hemp is offering on the campus 
rams. He has a total enrollment of 

SCHOOL 
LeRoy 
Charleston 
Clifton (Central) 
Atwood 
Monticello 
Potomac 
Paris 

DeLand-Weldon 
Champaign 
Mahomet 

Mattoon 
Rantoul 
Cerro Gordo 
Toledo (Cumberland) 



Student Teachers for Spring Semester . Ten senior students will be doing their student teaching 
this semester at Henry, Lawrenceville , Joliet, Mahomet, Minonk, Sycamore, and Sullivan high 
schools, Two of these student teachers hold the American Farmer Degree and eight have been 
awarded the State Farmer Degree. The names of these student teachers, years of vocational 
agriculture, their home high schools, and names of their former vocational agriculture teachers, 
are as follows: 



Years 



Name 


Vo, Ag. 


Robert Cottingham 





Archie Devore 


4 


Dennis Hackett 


4 


Joe Hampton 


4 


Charles Higgins 


4 


Larry Hippen 


3 


Lynn Laible 


4 


Max Muirheid 


4 


Wm. Schreck 


4 


Larry Spengler 


4 



High School 
Lyons Twp. High School 
Mulberry Grove 
Tuscola 
Windsor 
Mt. C arm el 
Warren (Monmouth) 
Lo w Point - W as hbu rn 
Niantic-Harristown 
Avon 
Sherrard 



Vo. 



Ag. 



Teacher 



(no vo-ag offered) 
Richard Lowe 
Wendell Schrader 
Luther Martz 
Robert Irvin 
Eldon Aupperle 
Kenneth Condit 
Donald Nettleton 
Lee West 
Duane Gregory 



PEH 



Vocational agriculture students interested in teaching . We appreciate the response to our 
annual request for names of young men whom you would recommend to us as prospective future 
teachers of agriculture. The form is repeated in this issue of the AIDS for teachers who might 
have missed the earlier requests. Please list the names and addresses of senior students you 
wish to recommend, and send it to the Division of Agricultural Education, University of Illinois, 
357 Education Building, Urbana. AHK 



Names of Seniors 



Addresses 









Signed 




Address 


AIDS, March 1965 


-2- 







Vocational Agriculture Teacher 



ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRIC 

NORMAL, ILLINOIS 61761 




AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



Student Teachers for Second Semester . Fifteen men are enrolled in Agricultural 296, 
Methods and Procedures in Agricultural Education for the first 9 weeks of the second 
semester, 1964-65. They will begin student teaching April 5 and complete their assign- 
ment on June 11, 1965. 

Student 





Home 
High School 


High School 
Vo-Ag Teacher 


Years of 
Vo-Ag 


Teaching 
Center 


♦Allen, Richard 


Homer 


Kent Durbin 


4 


Pontiac 


Andes, George 


Jerseyville 


Charles Hamilton 
Paul Carey 


3 


Normal 


Cagley, Charles 


Normal 


Clarence Kuster 
Delmar Schleder 


4 


Pontiac 


Duis, John 


Milford 


Ralph Goodman 


4 


Washington 


Hanson, Richard 


Serena 


Robert Jurgens 
Dana Lewis 


4 


Morris 


McClenning, Henry 


Woodland 


Fred Anderson 


3 


Morris 


Mueller, Don 


Rockridge 


William McKelvey 


4 


Yo rkville 


Short, Ronald 


Greenfield 







Wapella 


Skinner, Ronald 


Fieldon 


Charles Hamilton 
Paul Carev 


2 


Maroa 


Speers, William L. 


Odell 


Clark Heuer 
Clarence Burton 


4 


Yorkville 


*Stallings , Glen Dale 


Carmi 


Ernest Johnson 


4 


Maroa 


Stevenson, Larry 


Clifton 


Maynard Boudreau 


4 


Peotone 


Toepke, Donald D. 


Heyworth 


Virgil Butler 


4 


Peotone 


Wagner, Eugene 


Mt. Sterling 







New Lenox 


Wilson, Donald 


Yorkville 


Marion Welles 


3 


New Lenox 


**Richardson, Ned 


Orion 


Raymond Kuhn 
Robert Mills 


4 


LeRoy 



*State Farmer 
**Student Teaching Only 

AIDS, March 1965 




ilAVAT 



NEWS 



ILLINOIS ASSN. OF VO-AG TEACHERS 



1964-65 Diary 

I think I remember somewhere during tins busy year hearing that the d-Con company 
will again sponsor a split -year diary for the NVATA. (After having received 214 letters 
and written 251 letters to date, I'm not sure of anything any more. . . . and you should see 
my desk. What a mess'. '. ). The diaries will be distributed at the June Conference. Your 
sectional chairman will have them to pass out during the sectional meetings, 

^Jc s4c sk ^fc ?k sk 

LET US KNOW 

Your Executive Committee would appreciate any suggestions you might give us 
on how to make your IAVAT a more functional organization for the agriculture teachers 
hi the state. Let us hear from you. I am sure there are many ideas that should be brought 
to our attention. 

ILLINOIS VOCATIONAL PROGRESS MAGAZINE 

Did you notice the cover design on the February issue of the ILLINOIS VOCATIONAL 
PROGRESS magazine? (The one that carries the IVA convention program at Peoria, Pere 
Marquette Hotel, February 25-27). 1 want to thank Stan Walker, Media, for taking time 
from his busy schedule to submit the design. 






VO-AG TEACHER DIES 



Gale V. Gossett, 45, ofR.R. 3, Princeton, died Thursday afternoon, February 4, 
at Perry Memorial Hospital after an illness of several weeks. He is survived by his 
wife, Peggy and two daughters, Vicki and Shelly, both at home. 

He was a member of St. Matthew's Lutheran Church, and had been the vocational- 
agriculture teacher at Princeton High School for the past 21 years. 

I'm sure all who knew him are deeply shocked and saddened at his death and only 
wish it were within our power to alleviate the sadness that has come to his wife and family. 

AIDS, March 1965 



BELATED CONGRATULATIONS ! 

Ralph Endress, son of Mr. & Mrs. Levi Endress of William sfield, and Gary 
Weinard of Rossville represented the Illinois FFA for six months in Denmark from 
May 1, 1964 to October 31, 1964. The two boys then toured 15 European countries 
from November 1 to December 28 before returning home. 

Ralph lived and worked at KJAERGARD LANDBRUGSSKOLE, BRAMMINGE, 
DENMARK. This was an agricultural school where 26 young men attended classes 
under 4 teachers. I believe both boys are available for slide programs of their 
activities. I have had the opportunity to see Ralph's program and can recommend it 
very highly. 

It is one thing to itch for something, but another 
matter to scratch for it. 

****** 

GET ACQUAINTED WITH YOUR OFFICERS 

'Leroy Lawrence was elected to a two year term as Director of District II of LAVAT 
in June 1965. Lawrence is in his 11th year as teacher of vocational agriculture at 
Lockport Township High School, Lockport. 

The new director taught vo-ag previously in Illinois for two years at Buckley-Loda, 
one year at Wellington, and one year out of state at Eutaw, Alabama. 

His work experience, in addition to teaching, includes two years as agricultural 
representative of a commercial firm (Standard Oil Company) and three years in 
military service. 

Lawrence's education includes the M. S, plus 30. He received the B. S, in '47 and 
the M. S„ in '50 at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, and the additional credits 
at the Universities of Kentucky and Illinois. 

He is active in vocational agriculture having been elected to sectional chairman of 
IAVAT two times and having served as sectional advisor of FFA for two terms. 

Local community and school activities include Sunday school teacher, Sunday school 
supt. and Vice Moderator of First Baptist Church of Joliet. He has been class sponsor 
for five years, has been elected twice as V. P. of local teachers organization and is 
currently V.P. of Lockport Twp, Schools Credit U. , of which he is a charter board 
member." 



AIDS, March 1965 



(tear sheet) 



TO: Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61803 

Please send the following items: 



Number Price* Amount 



$1.00 



03 



10 



10 



15 



10 



Summary of Presentations, 17th Illinois Custom Spray 
Operators' Training School 

Feed Tag Analysis, 5 p. 

Scrambled Book No. 105, Making the Butterfat Test 

Scrambled Book No. 402, Producing Oats 

Scrambled Book No. 502, Subsidiary Motions, Parliamentary 
Procedure No. 2 

Scrambled Book No. 503, Incidental Motions, Parliamentary 
Procedure No. 3 



*Prices do not include postage. 



Name 



Address 



Billing_ 



School 



Vocational Agriculture Service 

434 Mumford Hall 

Urbana, Illinois 



AIDS, March 1965 



INDEX TO ITEMS IN VO-AG SERVICE SECTION 

Page 
No. 

Agricultural Releases 1 

Agriculture Student Guest Day 1 

Book Display and List Revision 3 

Correction - Small Engines Information 1 

Feed Tag Analysis 2 

In-Service Courses Scheduled 2 

Moormans Scholarship Program „ . . 1 

New Bulletins and Circulars . 1 

New Scrambled Books 3 

1965 Beef Management Suggestions . 3 

Sheep Shearing Schools 2 

Summary of Presentations - Custom Spray School ................. 2 

Swine Day ..................„.,.< 3 



AIDS, March 1965 



PRICE LIST OF FEEDS- 
February 22, 1965 

The feed prices for many of the feedstuffs used in vocational agriculture projects are listed 
below. This list is meant to be used as a basis of values for all boys obtaining their feed at 
home. All feed actually purchased should, of course, be recorded at prices paid. 

Kind of feed 

Corn, shelled, bu $ 1.20 

Corn, ground shelled, bu 1.30 

Com, ground ear, bu 1,30 

Oats, bu .68 

Oats, ground, bu .78 

Barley, (feed) bu 1.08 

Barley, ground or rolled, bu » 1. 13 

Sorghum, grain, cwt 2.09 

Sorghum, grain, cracked, cwt 2.19 

Garbage and kitchen waste , ton 8 . 50 

Skim and buttermilk, cwt 1.50 

Whole milk, Grade B, cwt . .. . 3.00 

Com silage, ton 10.00 

Sorghum silage, ton 9.00 

Haylage 11.00 

Clover and mixed hay ) All hay prices are 25.00 

Alfalfa ) for baled hay and straws 25.00 

Timothy hay ) Loose hay So less per ton . 22.00 

Oat straw or wheat straw 18.00 



— Prepared by W. W. Albert, Dept. of Animal Science. University of Illinois. Urbana. 111. 



AIDS, March 1965 



VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE SERVICE 

UnlvsrtlW ef Illinois - ColUa* of Agriculture 

434 MUMFORD HALL • URBANA, ILLINOIS 




SERIALS DEPARTMENT 
UMIV OF ILL LIBRARY 



SSHL 






JLLL 

c~of- ^ 



VO-AG AIDS 



I 






Volume 23 , Number 9 
April 1965 



luued jointly by 
Vocational Agriculture Service, College of Agriculture 

and 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

in Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 



VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 



Advance Order Units Complete. The last two new subject-matter- units have been sent out 
to advance order subscribers since the last issue of the AIDS. They are: 

Unit No. Title No. of Pages 

2010a The Soil Fertility Program — Economic Considerations, 

Build-Up and Removal 16 

3017 Farm Building Appraisal 24 

Copies of these units are now available for open distribution at l£ per page, plus postage 
(3/4£ per page if part of an order that exceeds 1, 000 pages). These are listed on the tear 
sheet for your convenience in ordering, 

JWM 

New Bulletins and Circulars . Three new circulars and one new bulletin have been received 
since the last issue of the AIDS. They are as follows: 

Circular 904 Geraniums for the Home and Garden 

Circular 906 Make Pesticides Work for You 

Circular 907 1965 Herbicide Guide for Commercial Vegetable Growers 

Bulletin 7 06 Structure of the Soybean Processing Industry 

Copies of the circulars were sent in April Agricultural Releases. Bulletin 706 was not 
sent because of its technical nature but is available on request for those interested. 

JWM 

In-Service Courses . Two courses on the use of the Electrical Controls kit are scheduled 
for April, as follows: 

Thursday, April 8 - Section 20, Newton - 4:30 p.m. 
Tuesday, April 13 - Section 18, Jamaica (Sidell) - 4:30 p.m. 

If you are outside these sections and would like to take one of these courses, please let us 
know so that we can make arrangements for you, 

JWM 

Oxy-Acetylene Visuals . A set of 73 visuals on oxy-acetylene cutting and welding was in- 
cluded in the April Agricultural Releases. These are 8 J x 11 inch instructional illustra- 
tions for use in making overhead projection transparencies, for direct use with an opaque 
projector, or for use as charts. For those who did not get them in Agricultural Releases, 
this packet of visuals is available at a cost of 85£ plus postage. They are included on the 
tear sheet. 

RFE 

Calendar of Events . Calendar of Events for the school year 1965-66 was included in April 
Agricultural Releases. Extra sets are available at 15£ each plus postage. They are in- 
cluded on the tear sheet. 

JWM 

AIDS, April 1965 -1- 



Cattle Feeders Day will be held April 15 at the University Auditorium „ The morning session 
includes reports by the beef division staff on corn silage-haylage studies, supplementing 
silages, cornstalk silage for wintering dry pregnant cows, observations on cattle parasites, 
and Illinois beef of tomorrow contest. The afternoon session includes presentations on 
selected carcasses, utilizing urea supplements, and effects of type, energy level, and 
hormone treatment on beef production. 

If you are interested in a copy of the printed program, please let us know and we will get 
you one. All teachers and/or students are welcome to attend. 

USG/WHW 

1965 Beef Cattle Ration Suggestions, 1965 Hog Business Management Suggestions, and 1965 
Hog Business Ration Suggestions are revisions of the 1964 versions by the same titles. A 
copy of each is included in the April Agricultural Releases. Additional copies may be obtain- 
ed as long as the supply lasts . 

WHW 

Illinois Laws Affecting Human and Animal Health was included in April Agricultural Releases ■ 
Those not receiving Agricultural Releases, or anyone wanting an additional copy, may get it 
by contacting Vocational Agriculture Service or writing direct to the College of Veterinary 
Medicine. The supply will not allow filling of quantity orders. 

WHW 

Farmers Tax Guide. We find that about 75 copies remain from the supply we obtained for 
Agricultural Releases. We will be glad to send these to any who wish to pay the postage. 

JHH 

Remaining Supplies of Insurance Materials and Interest Calculator . We have about 100 cop- 
ies remaining of these materials used at the 1964 summer courses in Financial Management. 
These items are listed on the tear sheet: Life Insurance for Farm Families, Planning Family 
Insurance, and Interest Rate Calculator. We will probably dispose of any copies remaining 
in June. If you want copies for next year, it would be well to order them now. 

JHH 

Agronomy Facts VM. This consists of bound copies of the Agronomy Facts issued by the 
Agronomy Department during the period October 6, 1961, to May 28, 1962. This volume 
is available at $1.00 per copy, plus postage. It is included on the tear sheet for your con- 
venience. T?TC 

Income Tax Illustration Based on 1964 Farm Record Problem . We have approximately 150 
of these remaining from the supply used for Agricultural Releases and will sell them for 
10 cents each. We expect to dispose of any extra copies remaining in June. The item is 
included on the tear sheet for your convenience in ordering. THH 

The following information was supplied by Dean CD. Smith, College of Agriculture: 

September Admissions, University of Illinois - The "college door" is closing faster than many 
people realize. If you have seniors who rank in the upper 5 of their graduating class, or in 
the upper h of their graduating class with above average ACT scores, who plan to enroll but 
have not yet applied for admission, urge them to do so immediately. Priority for admissions 
is being given to these two groups at the present time but the available space is fast filling up. 

CDS 
AIDS, April 1965 -2- 



Ag Guest Day - Over 1,000 high school students, parents, agriculture teachers and others 
attended the College of Agriculture Guest Day at Urbana on March 6. (Another 1, 000 
attended Home Economics Hospitality Day on the same date.) 

The breakdown of those who registered shows the following attendance: 



College students 


26 


Vo-Ag Teachers 


80 


High School Seniors 


254 


Other teachers 


2 


High School Juniors 


206 


Parents 


67 


High School Sophomores 


134 


Farm Advisers and Asst. 


14 


High School Freshmen 


81 


Home Advisers and Asst. 


3 


Grade School 


7 


Others 


19 


Year Not Indicated 


11 




. 185 


Total Students. . . . 


719 




. 904 



The figures are almost identical with those for last year when 913 registered. Once again 
we wish to express our thanks and appreciation to the 80 or more vo-ag teachers who 
brought students to this event. 

Due to the necessity for students to make plans for attending college much earlier than in 
the past, we are giving serious consideration to holding this event in October or November. 
If you have any arguments pro or con for such change, we would be glad to hear from you. 

CDS 



AIDS, April 1965 -3- 



m 



m 



m 



t=lt 



]D 




AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION / COLLEGE OF EDUCATION / UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



VOTEC 474, Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs . Since one of the preparatory 
steps for teachers planning to provide cooperative programs in agriculture is completion 
of VOTEC 474 (see Essentials and Requirements of a Vocational Agriculture Program , 
Illinois Board of Vocational Education and Rehabilitation, Series B, Bulletin No. 197, 
January 1965, p. 7) plans have been made to offer this course in all areas of Illinois during 
the next three years. The following is the proposed schedule for the course. 



Second semester 1964-65 

Summer 1965 

First semester 1965-66 

Summer 1966 

First semester 1966-67 

Second semester 1966-67 

Summer 1967 

First semester 1967-68 

First semester 1968-69 

Summer 1969 



Campus 

Campus 

District m, Sections 11- 

Campus 

District I, Sections 1-5 

Campus 

Campus 

District V, 

District II, 

Campus 



15 



Sections 21-25 
Sections 6-10 



It is anticipated that the University of Illinois may replace the semester system with the 
quarter system. If this occurs, it will probably be possible to "blanket" the state with 
VOTEC 474 in a shorter time. 

Please consult the preceding schedule for VOTEC 474 and plan when you will take the course. 
Teachers in District IV, Sections 16-20, will be expected to enroll for the course when it is 
offered on the campus. 

LJP 

1965 Summer Session, June 21 -July 16 . Many teachers are now making plans for changes 
in programs of vocational education in agriculture as a result of the Vocational Education 
Act of 1963. The 1965 summer session courses in agricultural education are being designed 
especially for teachers who are in the process of or are contemplating the implementation of 
changes in programs in keeping with the broadened objectives of vocational agriculture. 

If you are replanning the agricultural mechanics program, VOTEC 475, Organizing and 
Teaching Agricultural Mechanics, is one course that will be of interest to you. If your 
concern is establishing a cooperative employment -experience program, VOTEC 474, 
Supervised Agricultural Experience in Vocational Agriculture, is designed especially for 
you. If the planning of new courses, or the replanning of existing courses is scheduled for 
this summer, you will want to consider enrolling in VOTEC 472, Course Planning and 
Teaching Procedures in Vocational Agriculture, Teachers with master's degrees and those 
working toward the Advanced Certificate in Education will find VOTEC 459, Workshop in 
Curriculum Development, designed specifically to meet their needs. 

In the near future you will receive a brochure describing all four-week summer session 
offerings in agriculture, agricultural education, and education. The schedule for courses 
in agricultural education is as follows: 



AIDS, April 1965 



(cont.) 



VOTEC 459 (A) Workshop in Curriculum Development 
(| unit) 3 -5 TWThF 



VOTEC 472 Course Planning and Teaching Procedures in 

Vocational Agriculture (5 unit) 1-3 TWThF 

VOTEC 474 Supervised Agricultural Experience in Vocational 

Agriculture (k unit) 10-12 TWThF 

VOTEC 475 Organizing and Teaching Agricultural Mechanics 

(iunit) 8-10 TWThF 



PHIPPS, HEMP 

FULLER, 

WARMBROD 

FULIER 

WARMBROD 



PHIPPS 



JRW 



Ag Guest Day . About 70 students, teachers, and parents attended the Agricultural Educa- 
tion interest group on Saturday, March 6, at the University of Illinois. The group met in 
the New Education Building, Box lunches were served at noon, so visitors and staff mem- 
bers could visit informally during the lunch period. 

PEH 

Placement Report . The placement season is just around the corner!. Three vacancies are 
presently listed in the Educational Placement office, but more can be expected by the end 
of March. Teachers who have advanced degrees, successful teaching experience, and an 
interest in teaching agriculture at the postsecondary level are urged to submit their names 
and a brief statement regarding their qualifications to Dr. Paul Hemp, 358 Education. 
Programs in agricultural mechanics, ornamental horticulture, agricultural business and 
industry, and farm machine technology are being planned at the postsecondary level in 
Illinois and surrounding states. Teachers will be needed for new postsecondary programs 
and for secondary vocational ornamental horticulture. 

PEH 

Alpha Tau Alpha Initiation. Eighteen students were initiated into Alpha Tau Alpha, national 
professional fraternity for college students majoring in agricultural education. Initiation 
ceremonies were held at Paradise Inn, Savoy, Illinois, on March 21, The major address 
was presented by Dean C. D. Smith who described vocational agriculture and agricultural 
education programs in California. The names, home high schools, and vocational agri- 
culture teachers of the initiates are as follows: 



Name 

John Abell 
David Bechtel 
David Berg 
Allen Berry 
Pete Cahill 
John Dittmer 
Donald Husinga 
Bill Johnson 
John Macke 
Max Muirheid 
Mervin Peters 
Max Pierson 
Robert Potts 
Carl Reynolds 
Stephen Rinkenberger 

James Stevens 
Jack Stork 
Paul Wesbecher 

AIDS, April 1965 



High School 

Eldorado 

Eureka 

Paxton 

Nauvoo -Colusa 

Brimfield 

Bo wen 

Deland-Weldon 

Kane land 

Marshall 

Ni antic 

Paxton 

Princeton 

Williamsfield 

Brownstown 

Cissna Park 

Paxton 

Camp Point 

Sparta 

Sparta 

-2- 



Teacher 

G. L. Ellis 
Art Phillips 
Robert Rohlfing 
James O'Hara 
Tom Fitz simmons 
Robert Williamson 
Lawrence Gregory 
T. W. Anderson 
W. T. Spittle r 
Don Nettleton 
Robert Rohlfing 
Gale Gossett 
James Guilinger 
Max Grinnell 
Roland Meyer 
Robert Rohlfing 
Curtiss Sherman 
Ray Deason 
Ray Deason 

PEH 



Articles for the Agricultural Education Magazine , The studies made and new procedures 
developed in order to implement the Vocational Education Act of 1963 provide a rich source 
of ideas and content for magazine articles. More Illinois teachers should be represented in 
their national professional journal. 

Take a good look at the length and organization of the articles currently being published and 
then go to work on an article of your own. I will be happy to review your articles and give 
you suggestions, if you wish. 

AHK 

Vocational agriculture students interested in teaching . We appreciate the response to our 
annual request for names of young men whom you would recommend to us as prospective 
future teachers of agriculture. The form is repeated in this issue of the ADDS for teachers 
who might have missed the earlier requests. Please list the names and addresses of senior 
students you wish to recommend, and send it to the Division of Agricultural Education, 
University of Illinois, 357 Education Building, Urban a. 

AHK 

Names of Seniors Addresses 



Signed 



Vocational Agriculture Teacher 
Address 



ADDS, April 1965 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

CARBONDAIE \\\\ ^-^ ILLINOIS 



School of Agriculture 



^j ( Agricultural Industries Department 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 

Students Completing Student Teaching This Year . Ten student teachers completed their 
student teaching during the fall quarter. 



Name 

1. Dillow, Darrell 

2. Kloth, Donald 

3. Likes, Stan 

4. Mealiff, Paul 

5. Newbold, Lowell 

6. Phillips, Jerry 

7. Sims, Richard 

8. Waggoner, Darwin 

9. Washburn, Keith 
10. Wetherell, Keith 



Home High School 
Anna 
Sparta 
Winchester 
Mendon 
Alto Pass 
McLeansboro 
Palmyra 
Bridgeport 
Brownstown 
Shumway 



Student Teaching Center 
Joppa 

Pinckneyville 
Murphysboro 
Murphysboro 
Trico 
Joppa 

Pinckneyville 
Trico 
Flora 
Flora 

ESW 



Graduate Agricultural Summer Session Courses . The following agricultural courses will be 
offered the first four weeks of the summer session at Southern Illinois University, 
June 21 -July 16. 

Course Credit Instructor 

Ag. 



I. 581 - Farm Law 



PI. I. 402 



Soil Morphology 
and Classification 



3 
4 



7:30-9:40 MTThF 

9:50-12:00 MTWThF 
1:20-3:30 W 



Hannah 
Jones 

WJW 



School of Agriculture High School Guest Day April 3. The annual School of Agriculture High 
School Guest Day will be Saturday, April 3. Registration will be in the Agriculture Building 
from 8:30-9:30 a.m. 

ESW 

Fourth Annual Southern Illinois Farm Materials Handling Exposition . The Fourth Annual 
Southern Illinois Farm Materials Handling Exposition has been scheduled for March 31 and 
April 1 at the Washington County Fairgrounds, Nashville, 111. , under joint sponsorship of 
the Electric Power Suppliers of Illinois, Southern Illinois University, the University of Illi- 
nois Cooperative Extension Service and Successful Farming. Exposition hours are noon to 
9 p.m. March 31, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 1. 

ESW 

Farm Credit Workshop. The Annual Farm Credit Workshop sponsored by the Southern 
Illinois University Agricultural Industries Department will be held in the University Center 
on the SIU Campus April 6, beginning at 9:30 a.m. 

WJW 



AIDS, April 1965 




IAVAT 



NEWS 



ILLINOIS ASSN. OF VO-AG TEACHERS 



Wives Program at June Conference 



Wed. 



Thurs 



Fri. 



June 9 


-9:30 A.M. - 




1:00 P.M. - 


. , June 


10 -7:30 A.M. 




9:30 A.M. 




1:00 P.M. 




6:00 P.M. 


June 11 


- 9:00 A.M. 



Registration, announcements, coffee "klatch" 
Card party, etc. 

- PCA Breakfast, Agr. Teachers and wives 

- Tour of Campus by bus 

- Lunch at Colonial Room, 
Meeting and Election of Officers 

- IAVAT Banquet 

-Shopping Tour, new shopping center - 
Lunch while shopping - 
Plans for 1966 - adjourn 



Although the fishing is always better when the game warden is not looking over 
your shoulder, I'm sure YOUR better half will want to know that the women's auxiliary 
of Agr. teachers are organized and operating efficiently under the very capable leader- 
ship of Mrs. Doris Huggins, Rockton. Now I can think of a lot of reasons why the Agr. 
teachers of the state don't take time to fill out and mail blanks; but I can also think of 
many more reasons why YOU BETTER fill this one in and MAIL IT. Seriously men, 
this addition to our June Conference has been well received by the wives in attendance. 
The tours, etc. , have been well planned and well executed. (And besides that when a 
fella drives a VW he couldn't haul home everything his wife could buy in three days, 
now could he Jane ?) 

NOW HEED THIS 

You are again invited and urged to bring ideas that have worked for you to the June 
Conference for the EXCHANGE -OF -IDEAS Contest and display at the VO-AG SHOP & 
STORAGE building. The contest will again be divided into two categories this year. 

(1) Field and Shop Aids 

(2) Classroom Aids 

Three prizes will be awarded in each class and a memento will be provided for 
each participant. Any entry blank is included in this issue of the AIDS. Vo-Ag Service will re- 
produce plans or type material for the display if you will send it to them by the date carried 
on the entry blank. 



AIDS, April 1965 



HEAR ye: hear ye : 

The Production Credit Association has offered to serve the members of the IAVAT 
and their WIVES a breakfast, compliments of PCA, at the June Conference. Plans are to 
have this breakfast on Thursday morning, June 10. 






IAVAT BANQUET 

Kermit Esarey and his banquet committee are hard at work finalizing plans for the 
evening of Thursday, June 10. Get your tickets early so you won't be disappointed when 
they are all gone. 






JUNE CONFERENCE 

George Richter and his committee have planned an excellent program for June 9, 
10, and 11. Don't forget that your dues are due at this time. Your sectional chairmen 
will be anxious to collect all dues at the conference to eliminate chances of error. 

IVA CONVENTION 

The IAVAT section of the IVA Convention was very well attended considering the 
adverse weather conditions over much of the state. Our thanks go to Mel Nicol for 
planning the program and to all members who helped during the convention. President 
of IVA Jesse Keyser is to be congratulated on the execution of the convention. This is a 
tremendous job which Jesse has handled expeditiously. 

Our Chief of Agricultural Education, Mr, Guthrie, gave an excellent analysis of 
current problems. Some figures he cited are as follows: 

1. There are 25,400 public high schools and 5,000 junior high schools in the 
United States providing education for 11.2 million enrolled hi grades 9-12. 
Of these, 1.9 million, or 17%, are receiving vocational education. By 1974 
a 14.2 million enrollment is expected or an increase of 25%. 

2. 87% of jobs do not require a college degree, yet in Ohio a curriculum study 
showed that 81% of students in high school were enrolled in college prepara- 
tory courses. 

3. Illinois study of last year's graduates and dropouts of Voc. Agr. 

A, Total - 4344 

a. 1 year - 13% 

b. 2 " - 13% 

c. 3 " - 17% 

d. 4 " -57% 

We are doing a pretty good job of holding our students in spite of adversities. 

B, Armed Forces -7.6% 

C. Full time school - 32.7% 

D. Available for full time employment - 57,8% 



AIDS, April 1965 

I 



(1) In farming - 45% 

(2) Related - 26% 

(3) Non-Related - 23% 

(4) Unemployed - 2.4% 

4.5 million families in the U. S. who have children between the 
ages 5-17 earn less than $2,000 annually. 

WHAT CAN YOU DO TO REMEDY THE SITUATION 

A. Continue good work in agriculture education for production 
agriculture. 

B. Revise curriculum and include training for occupations which 
require the knowledge and skills involved in Agriculture. 

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE TEACHER AND 
THE SCHOOL COUNSELOR 

A study was conducted in Minnesota on a number of areas to show the amount of 
cooperation and contact between school counselors and the agriculture instructor. 

According to Rodger E. Palmer, Voc. Agr. Teacher at Pine City, Montana who 
reported on this study at the AVA, the farming and farm related occupations opportunities 
area led to two conclusions. They were: (1) there is good contact between the groups on 
this subject, or (2) some people are familiar with the question but don't really know. 

Counselors indicated they do not counsel into or away from a subject. It would 
appear that it would be up to them to carry the ball to the instructors and show them what 
they are really doing. Perhaps the counselors are using the instructors more than they 
realize for resource purposes. Again, the counselors need to make this known to the 
instructors. The instructors stated that they knew the role of the counselors, but the two 
groups didn't show any consistency on what the role is. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETS 

The executive committee met on Saturday, February 27, at the Pere Marquette 
in Peoria. 

It was reported that four IAVAT committees have not sent their report to Mel 
Nicol. If you have not sent your report, please do so as quickly as possible. 

The Ag. Education Departments and the State Office gave concise reports of 
activities pertinent to IAVAT. 

The committee discussed delinquent dues, state judging contest, exchange -of -ideas 
contest, IAVAT award recipients, IAVAT outstanding service awards, dues, establishing 
an Agribusiness Relations Committee, assembling an IAVAT history supplement, and 
agendas for the meetings of IAVAT at the June Conference, to mention a few. 

****** 



AIDS, April 1965 -3- 



ENTRY BLANK 

IAVAT EXCHANGE -OF -IDEAS CONTEST 

I propose to display the following item(s) in the IAVAT Exchange -of -Ideas Contest at the 
June Conference: 

Class 1 — Field and Shop Aids 



Class 2 — Classroom Aids 



Signed 
School 



Return this entry blank to Vocational Agriculture Service, 434 Mumford Hall, Urbana, 
before May 15, 1965. Include plans or copy if you wish to have them duplicated for 
distribution. 

Wives at June Conference 

I plan to bring my wife to the June Conference to participate in the special programs being 
planned by the wives committee. 

She will arrive 



She will stay until_ 



Signed_ 
School 



Return to Vocational Agriculture Service, 434 Mumford Hall, Urbana, before June 1, 1965. 



AIDS, April 1965 



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AZ?£ A ril 1965 



INDEX TO ITEMS FN VO-AG SERVICE SECTION 



Page 

No. 



Advance Order Units Complete . 1 

Ag Guest Day. . . . . . . 3 

Agronomy Facts VIII . 2 

Calendar of Events 1 

Cattle Feeders Day 2 

Farmers Tax Guide 2 

Illinois Laws Affecting Human and Animal Health 2 

Income Tax Illustration Based on 1964 Farm Record Problem ........... 2 

In-Service Courses . 1 

New Bulletins and Circulars 1 

1965 Beef Cattle Ration Suggestions, 1965 Hog Business Management 

Suggestions, and 1965 Hog Business Ration Suggestions 2 

Dxy-Acetylene Visuals 1 

Remaining Supplies of Insurance Materials and Interest Calculator . 2 

September Admissions, University of Illinois 2 



UD3, April 1965 



PRICE LIST OF FEEDS- 



March 19, 1965 



The feed prices for many of the feedstuffs used in vocational agriculture projects are listed 
below. This list is meant to be used as a basis of values for all boys obtaining their feed at 
home. All feed actually purchased should, of course, be recorded at prices paid. 

Kind of feed 



Corn, shelled, bu $1.22 

Corn, ground shelled, bu 1.32 

Corn, ground ear, bu 1.32 

Oats, bu 68 

Oats, ground, bu 7 8 

Barley, (feed) bu 1.09 

Barley, ground or rolled, bu . . 1.19 

Sorghum, grain, cwt 2.10 

Sorghum, grain, cracked, cwt. 2.20 

Garbage and kitchen waste, ton . 8.50 

Skim and buttermilk, cwt 1.50 

Whole milk, Grade B, cwt 3.00 

Corn silage, ton 10.00 

Sorghum silage, ton 9.00 

Haylage .11.00 

Clover and mixed hay ) All hay prices are . 25.00 

Alfalfa ) for baled hay and straws .............. , ... 25. 00 

Timothy hay ) Loose hay $5 less per ton . 22.00 

Oat straw or wheat straw 18.00 



— Prepared by W. W. Albert, Dept. of Animal Science , University of Illinois, Urbana, 111. 



AIDS, April 1965 



VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE SERVICE 

Unlvanity o* tttlnoti - Ctltmg* o* Agriculture 

434 MUMFOtD MALL • UtBANA, ILLINOIS 



SERIALS DEPARTMENT SSHL 

UNIV OF ILL LIBRARY 



VO-AG AIDS 



Volume 23 . Number 10 
May 1965 



btuod jointly by 
Vocational Agriculture Service, College of Agriculture 

and 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

in Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 



VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 



Billing for Agricultural Releases and Advance Orders As soon as we can calculate the 
cost of the May Agricultural Releases, you will receive a statement for the 1964-65 Re- 
leases, advance order units and advance order slidefilms. We will also add to this state- 
ment any open account charges that have accumulated since the last billing „ Accompanying 
the statement will be a multilithed letter giving more detail about these charges than can 
be put on the statement. We will appreciate it if you will certify these charges promptly 
and submit, the statement to the proper school authority for payment. If you have any ques- 
tions or did not receive any of the materials for which you are charged, please do not 
hesitate to write. 

JWM 

N ew Bulletins and Circulars . Since the last issue of the AIDS, three new publications have 
been received, as follows: 

Cir, 901 - Illinois Field Crops and Soils 
Cir 902 - Selection and Care of Sweaters and Knit Apparel 
Bui, 707 - Condemnation, Land Value, and Severance Damage on Farmland 
Only Cir. 901 was included in May Agricultural Releases, Single copies of the other pub- 
lications are available on request. 

JWM 

Rooms for the Conference , Rooms are available in University dormitories for teachers 
attending the June Conference. Prices are $4,38 per night single, or $3,09 per night 
shared. Rooms for couples are also available at $6,18 per couple. It is not necessary 
to make advance registration. Go to Clark House, 1215 S. Fourth Street (across from 
Huff Gym) when you arrive. 

JWM 

Wives' Program. A copy of the wives' conference program is included as a separate sheet 
in this issue of the AIDS so you can take it home. If your wife plans to come, please fill 
out and send in the form on page 4 of IAVAT News to help the committee in making their 
arrangements . 

JWM 

New Vo-Ag Service Shop and Storage Building . It looks now like our new building will be 
finished by about May 1 so that we can be moved into it before the June Conference, It is 
directly south of the old building, south of St. Mary's Road, on the road leading into the 
Agronomy South Farm, Please come to this location if you are returning an electrical box 
or bringing an entry for the Exchange -of -Ideas Contest. 

JWM 

Return of Surveying Kits . A special letter is going to the teachers in charge of surveying 
kits asking them to arrange to have the kit brought in to the June Conference. If you are 
driving a station wagon and have room, you may wish to volunteer to pick up the kit and 
bring it in from your section. If so, please contact the teacher in charge in your section, 

JWM 

AIDS, May 1965 -1- 



Opportunity for Student Employment , If you have a student attending the University of Illinois 
next year who needs financial assistance, you may be interested in the following information 
sent to us by Asst, Dean John R, Griffin: 

"The Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 contains a section that may be of interest 
to students coming to the University of Illinois who need financial assistance , 
Title I, Part C, of the Act establishes a College Work -Study Program to promote 
the part-time employment of students who are from low-income families and are 
in need of the earnings from such employment to pursue their courses of study, 
Applicable to both undergraduate and graduate students the Program is another 
step toward the goal of making higher education available to all who may benefit 
from it . 

"In order to be eligible for employment, a student must meet all o f the following 
requirements: 

1. He must be a citizen of the United States, 

2, He must be from a low-income family, or have no family, 

3 He must need the earnings from this employment in order to 

pursue a course of study at the University. 
4, He must be capable of maintaining good scholastic standing 

while employed. 
5c He must be in good standing and in full-time attendance at 

the University either as an undergraduate, graduate, or 

professional student 

"A 'low-income family' means a family having an income not greater than $3,000 per 
year, plus $600 for each dependent other than the student applicant; 

"Any student who feels he is qualified and is interested in investigating further the 
employment opportunities to be offered under the Work -Study Program should 
request application forms from University of Illinois Student Employment Office, 
1 Student Services Building, Champaign, Illinois . " 

JWM 

Soybean Varieties in Illinois for 1965 . This report which was included in the May Agricul- 
tural Releases gives the latest information available on soybean varieties in Illinois, It 
includes results from the agronomy research trials as well as yields from county demon- 
stration plots. Quantity copies are available, but the supply is limited and will not be rerun. 
It is included on the tear sheet for your convenience. 

RLC 

New Slidefilms . Four new slidefilms have been released and sent to all schools having 
advance orders for new slidefilms. The new slidefilms that were sent are as follows: 

206-65 Testing Milk for Butte rf at 

340-65 Hlinois Crop-Share Cash Farm Lease 

401-65 Diagramming Electrical Wiring Circuits 

497 The Safe Use and Care of Ladders 

If you have an advance order for slidefilms and did not receive these, please let us know. 
This is our final shipment for the 1964-65 school year. 

All of the above films are now available to those who did not receive them on advance order. 
They are listed on the tear sheet for the convenience of any wishing to order, 

RLC 

AIDS, May 1965 -2- 



Grain Ju dging Contest. 



Weeds in the State Grain Judging Contest will be identified from 
Slidefilm 791 - Identification of Weeds (Color) - shows all of the weeds 

It is available at $2.35, plus 

It is included again 
The sale of 



colored slides 

included in the 1965 Illinois State Judging Contest Rules 

postage. Advance order subscribers were sent this film in January 

on the tear sheet for the convenience of those who did not receive a copy 

individual weed slides has been discontinued. 



RLC 



University of Illinois Experimental Field Meetings . Vocational agriculture teachers, 
their students, and others interested in experimental field meetings are welcome to 
attend any of the following: 



Date 



Field 



June 10 




Brownstown Research Center 


June 14 




Newton 


June 15 




Carthage 


June 17 




Urbana (Agronomy Day) 


June 30 




Hartsburg 


July 1 




Northern Illinois Research Center 


July 29 




Carbondale (in cooperation with 
Southern Illinois University) 


August 30 




Kewanee 


August 31 




Ewing 


September 


3 


Brownstown Research Center 


September 


7 


Aledo 


September 


8 


Oblong 


September 


8 


Carthage 


September 


9 


Clayton 


September 


9 


Newton 


September 


10 


Toledo 


September 


14 


Carlinville 


September 


15 


Dixon 


September 


16 


Elwood Research Center 





Starting 


County 


Time 


Fayette 


9:00 a.m. 


Jasper 


1:00 p.m. 


Hancock 


7:00 p.m. 


Champaign 


9:00 a.m. 


Logan 


1:00 p.m. 


DeKalb 


1:00 p.m. 


Jackson 


1:00 p.m. 


Henry 


6:30 p.m. 


Franklin 


1:00 p.m. 


Fayette 


9:00 a.m. 


Mercer 


1:00 p.m. 


Crawford 


1:00 p.m. 


Hancock 


1.00 p.m. 


Adams 


1:00 p.m. 


Jasper 


1-00 p.m. 


Cumberland 


1:00 p.m. 


Macoupin 


6:30 p.m. 


Lee 


1:00 p.m. 


Will 


1:00 p.m. 



RLC 

Guides for Use in Planning Beef Feeding Systems AE-3971, Dec. 1963 . We have located 
another 150 copies of this item which was distributed in connection with the 1964 summer 
course in Farm Management. It is included on the tear sheet for your convenience in 
ordering, 

JHH 



Shearing Combs and Cutters for Sale, 



Prof. G. R. Carlisle of Animal Science Extension 



reports that they have 10 sets of combs and cutters for the new 2j-inch Shearmaster that 
they would sell. These were new at the start of the sheep shearing schools this year. 

Price - Combs - $2.00 
Cutters - .85 



If you are interested, contact Prof. G. R. Carlisle, 326 Mumford Hall, Urbana, 111. 



WHW 



AIDS, May 1965 



-3- 



Your 1965 Lamb -Feeding Guide . A copy of this publication is being included in the May Agr, 
Releases, There is a limited quantity of the booklets remaining. If you need additional copies 
for classroom use, we can fill orders for limited quantities as long as the supply lasts, 

WHW 

Judging Rules , The rules for the state vocational agriculture judging contests were sent 
about April 1. If you did not receive your copy, please let us laiow and we will send you 
another one. 

The only changes in the rules since last year are in the lists of crops and weeds. Because 
of the change, you may wish to look these over more closely than you would have otherwise . 
The revised lists were also printed in the January VO-AG AIDS, 

WHW 

Purebred Ram and Ewe Sale and Carcass Show , Dr. U. S. Garrigus of the Department of 
Animal Science reports that the Illinois Purebred Sheep Breeder's Association is again hold- 
ing a purebred ram and ewe sale. It will be on June 26 at the Stock Pavilion at Urbana. The 
sifting will be at 9:30 a.m. CDT and the sale at 1:00 p.m.. 

An added attraction this year will be a lamb and carcass show held in conjunction with the 
sale. The show will be restricted to lambs closely related to animals in the sale. Carcass 
information will be obtained on all animals in the show and will be made available to all 
interested parties just before the sale, 

Anyone interested is cordially invited to attend. 

GER-WHW 

Book List Revised c Every two years we write to the publishers that furnish books for the 
Vocational Agriculture Service book display and bring our display up to date. The new list 
of the books with copyright dates, prices and addresses of publishers has just been printed 
A copy was included in May Agricultural Releases, If you do not receive Releases and wish 
a copy of the book list, please let us know. 

JWM 

New Rapid Rater Questions. Ten new sets of questions for use with the Rapid Rater, or for 
direct marking, have been developed with the following titles: 

107 - Making the Butterfat Test 

108 - Caring for the Sow and Litter at Farrowing Time 

216 - Planning for Sound Land Use 

217 - Developing the Land -Use Plan and Field Layout 

218 - Inventory Your Resources for Farm Planning 

219 - The Soil Fertility Program — Economic Considerations, Buildup and Removal 

220 - Capitalism, Socialism and Communism 

408 - Producing Oats 

409 - Controlling Insects of Vegetable Crops 

410 - Planning a Fertilizer Program 

TL a ;e multiple choice questions based on the new subject matter units released in 1964-65. 
The^' a. e available in packets of 20 at 20£ per packet, plus postage, and are listed on the tear 
sheet in this issue of the AIDS. A package containing one of each of the above was included in 
May Agricultural Releases. 

JWM 



AIDS, May 1965 



tdt 



on 



M^sj^ 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION / COLLEGE OF EDUCATION / UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



VOTEC 47 4 Offered in District in . Notices are being sent to all teachers of agriculture in 
District III (Sections 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15) informing them that VOTEC 474 will be avail- 
able to them extramurally the first semester of 1965-66, Since one of the preparatory 
steps for teachers planning to provide cooperative programs in agriculture is completion 
of VOTEC 474 (See Essentials and Requirements of a Vocational Agriculture Program. 
Illinois Board of Vocational Education and Rehabilitation, Series B, Bulletin No. 197, 
Januaxy 1965, p. 7), teachers will need to consider whether or not they can afford not to 
enroll in this course when it is in their geographical area. 

The content of the course will be designed to assist teachers in organizing and administer- 
ing supervised agriculture experience programs of pupils placed in agriculturally oriented 
firms = Legal regulations, time requirements, supervisory requirements, training agree- 
ments, program agreements, on-job teaching methods, course reorganization and so forth 
will be included in the course. 

VOTEC 474 is a one -half unit course. Two sections of the course are planned to reduce 
travel distances for the persons enrolled. 

If you do not receive a notice regarding tentative enrollment in the course, please com- 
plete the following form and mail to the address indicated. 



TO: Lloyd J. Phipps 
Agr. Ed. Division 
University of Illinois 
357A College of Education 
Urbana, Illinois 

I plan to enroll in VOTEC 47 4 I prefer to meet on the night indicated: 

Tue sd ay 



Wednesday 
Thursdav 



Signed 



Address 



LJP 



AIDS, May 1965 



Four-Week Summer Session , The 1965 summer session for teachers of agriculture will be 
from June 21 - July 16, Next year will be a critical year for most teachers of agriculture. 
Most teachers will be making adjustments in their program to implement the Vocational 
Education Act of 1963= New courses are being organized. New types and kinds of supervised 
agriculture experience programs are being permitted. New content is being taught, Many 
teachers plan to attend the four-week summer session at the University of Illinois to prepare 
for the changes they plan to instigate in 1965-66. 

The courses in agricultural education are being adjusted to assist teachers in preparing for 
the new developments in vocational agriculture. Following are the courses that will be 
available. A brochure is available giving the details regarding these courses and the enroll- 
ment procedure. 

VOTEC 459(A) Workshop in Curriculum Development 

VOTEC 472 Course Planning and Teaching Procedures in Vocational Agriculture 

VOTEC 474 Supervised Agricultural Experience in Vocational Agriculture 

VOTEC 47 5 Organizing and Teaching Agricultural Mechanics 

HpEd 304 Social Foundations of Education 

Ed Psy 312 Mental Hygiene and the School 

Se Ed 448 Continuing (Adult; Education 

Agr, Econ. 324 Farm Operation 

An Sci 301 Beef Production 

An Sci 330 Reproduction and Artificial Insemination of Farm Animals 

Rural Soc 477 Rural Community Organization and Development 

LJP 

Registration Information , Some advance preparation for summer school registration may 

save a teacher considerable time and effort on June 21. Teachers registering for the first 

time in the Graduate College of the University of Illinois must obtain application blanks for 

', permits to enter. These application blanks are available from the Office of Admissions and 

I Records, 17 6 Administration Building (W). Applications for admission and complete 

credentials or certifications of degrees, as required, should be filed at least two weeks 
! prior to registration in order to avoid delay during registration, 

i Graduate students registered at the University of Illinois during the 1964-65 academic year 

or the 1964 summer session need not apply for readmission. If a teacher has been admitted 
i to the Graduate College but has not been enrolled during the 1964 summer session or the 
' 1964-65 academic year, on campus or extramurally , he must apply for readmission. Applica- 
tion blanks for readmission are also available from the Office of Admissions and Records, 
17 6 Administration Building (W). T Tp 

Advanced Certificate in Education Degree . Teachers of agriculture who have a Master's 
degree and who plan to attend the 1965 four-week summer school session may be interested 
in becoming a candidate for the Advanced Certificate in Education Degree. Approximately 
forty -five teachers of agriculture are now candidates for this degree at the University of 
Illinois. If you are interested in becoming a candidate for this degree, see one of the staff 
members in the Agricultural Education Division and ask him to assist you in planning a pro- 
gram for the degree. If you have a Master's degree and do not desire to become a candidate 
' for the Advanced Certificate in Education Degree, you may enroll in the 1965 four-week 
summer school session as a non-degree student. T Tp 

AIDS, May 1965 -2- 



Placement Report . The supply -demand situation for vocational agriculture in Illinois 
may be described best by the following data: 

Present vacancies 32 

Beginners qualified at the University of Illinois 

during 1964-65 22 

Beginners already placed 4 

Beginners who will pursue graduate work in 1965-66 3 

Beginners placed in non-teaching jobs 1 

Net supply of beginners available for teaching in 1965-66 14 

In addition to the fourteen beginners available for placement, two beginners returning 
from military service and the IYFE program are currently available for placement. 
Twenty -three experienced teachers, two of whom are not presently teaching, have activated 
their credentials in the Educational Placement Office. 

PEH 



AIDS, May 1965 -3- 



LLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY 
)EPARTMENT OF AGRICUtTUI 

JORMAL, ILLINOIS 61761 




AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



Alpha Tau Alpha News : 

Alpha Tau Alpha Officers . The following are the students who have been serving as officers 
for XI Chapter, Illinois State University, their home school, and vocational agriculture 
teachers : 



Office 
President 

Vice Pres. 

Secretary 
Treasurer 
Membership 
Publicity 



Student 
Ronald Skinner 

Myron Otto 

Ronald Short 
Jerry Crump 
Rich Hein 
William Spears 



Home High School 
Jerseyville 

Chenoa 

Greenfield 
Normal 
Kirkland 
Odell 



Voc. Agr. Teacher 

Charles Hamilton 
Paul Carey 
Owen Smith 
Stanley Sterrenberg 

Clarence Kuster 
John Olson 
C. E. Heuer 
C. Burton 



Advisors - Dr. A. A. Culver and Mr. R. K. Litherland 



Alpha Tau Alpha Activities . Following are some of the chapter activities for the year 1964-65. 

Activities to improve teaching: 

Speakers from various fields at meetings and activities. 

Activities for the professional improvement of members: 

Delegates attended the National Conclave at Kansas City 

Service Activities: 

Invitational Livestock Judging Contest held at the University Farm 

Thirty-one teams participated with a banquet and trophies and 

other awards on May 1, 1965 
Sponsoring the Illinois State University Homecoming Parade 
FFA Sectional judging contests on ISU Campus for sections 9, 12, 

and 5. Students prepared and showed all classes of livestock. 
Hobart Medal Banquet for outstanding senior sponsored by Funk 

Brothers Seed Company. Preparations by ATA members. 
Booth depicting ATA activities at Freshman Orientation Week 
Cleaning up judging pavilion after livestock sales 

Social Activities: 

Chili supper for fathers of ATA members 

Watermelon feed for freshmen 

Western Horse Show 

Chicken barbecue for alumni at Homecoming 



AIDS, May 1965 




IAVAT 



NEWS 



ILLINOIS ASSN. OF VO-AG TEACHERS 



WHO MX????? 

Xvxn though my typxwritxr is an old moclxl, it works quitx wxll, xcxpt for onx of 
its kxys. Thxrx arx 41 kxys that function, but onx kxy not working makxs thx diffxrxncx. 

Somxtimxs it sxxms to nix that our own organization is not unlikx my typxritxr 

in that not all thx kxys work propxrly. 

You may say, "Wxll, I am only onx pxrson. I won't makx or brxak an organization." 
But a succxssful organization to bx xffxctivx, rxquirxs thx activx participation of xvxry 
mxmbxr „ 

So thx nxxt timx you fxxl that your xf forts arx not nxxdxd, rxmxmbxr my old typx- 
ritxr and say to yoursxlf , "I am a kxy pxrson in our program and I am NXXDXD VXRY 
MUCH," 






reminder: 



If you have not sent in an entry for the Exchange -of -Ideas Contest, do so immedi- 
ately. Also, let us know if your wife is planning to attend any of the conference activities. 
A tear sheet was included in the April issue of the AIDS and another is included in this 
issue for your convenience. 

DUES 

Don't forget that the sectional chairmen will be collecting IAVAT dues during the 
June Conference at the sectional meetings. A 100% lighting ceremony will again be apart 
of our 2nd General Session on Thursday, June 10th. I hope we can have a little esprit de 
corps here. 

Probably most of you are aware of the fact that the AVA House of Delegates, at the 
Minneapolis Convention, passed the so called Wisconsin Amendment. This amendment will 
reduce the AVA dues from $10. 00 to $8, 00 without a rebate feature. 

The NVATA has established itself as the voice of Vocational Agricultural Education. 
To continue to merit this high recognition, it must continue to maintain a high percentage 
of its potential membership. In order to maintain, improve, and add to the services for 
its members, additional revenue will need to be secured from the membership. Sam Stenzel, 



AIDS, May 1965 



NVATA president, considers the 1965 convention as the ideal time to consider raising the 
annual dues. He further states that, "Unless the leaders of the Association wish to curtail 
the activities of their National Association, it is necessary that action on a dues increase be 
considered (and passed) at Miami in 1965. 

And now the IAVAT. It has long been the history of the LAV AT to operate on a shoe- 
string. Many activities have been curtailed and many more ideas "tabled" for lack of 
financial support, hi recent years we are finally beginning to get our heads above water, 
Past leaders have done an admirable job with limited funds. Commercial concerns sponsoring 
our awards program has certainly alleviated the situation. The State Office, Vo-Ag Service, 
and the Agriculture Education Departments have contributed unselfishly. Local Boards of 
Education have been generous beyond expectations. But, I challenge you, IAVAT members, 
after 35 years, we stand on our own two feet. HOW? That we leave the dues the same as 
they were last year and absorb the anticipated NVATA dues increase from our treasury. 

YOU HAVE AN ASSIGNMENT . 

Check your 1965 State Judging contest brochure for your assignment at the contest, 
Tuesday, June 22nd. Please note the contest will start at 12 noon, that registration clerks 
will be set up ready to start by 10:00 A.M. , and that you are to register your teams at the 
Vo-Ag Shop and Storage Building. 

STATE FFA SPONSORING COMMITTEE MEETS 

A luncheon meeting of the State Sponsoring committee was held at the St. Nicholas 
Hotel in Springfield on Thursday, March 25th, 

Hugh Muncie, Chairman of the State Sponsoring committee was presented a well 
earned plaque in commemoration of his services by Tom Fisher, president of the EL 
Assoc, of FFA. Ralph Endress gave a brief, illustrated talk of Ms experiences in Denmark, 
Ralph Guthrie gave a thumb-nail sketch of the Vocational Education Act of 1963, Harold 
Engelking presented a graphic illustration of "how the pie is cut, " Don Coil answered in- 
numerable questions on the FFA, and J, E. Hill reviewed objectives, 

if: *; * ^ :j; :fc 

COOP-YOUTH EDUCATION COMMITTEE MEETS 

The Illinois Agricultural Association and affiliated companies have a number of 
activities that they carry out in cooperation with the Illinois FFA, 

These activities are planned by a cooperative committee made up of members from 
the LAA and affiliated companies and the Illinois FFA. The IAVAT president is also a mem- 
ber of the committee . 

YES, THERE WILL BE A PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICERS WORKSHOP AT THE JUNE 
CONFERENCE THIS YEAR , 



AIDS, May 1965 



AWARDS 

The 10 and 20 year awards will be presented at the 2nd General Session of LA VAT, 
Thursday, June 10, and the 25, 30, & 35-year awards will be presented at the Banquet 
Thursday night. 



THANKS MUCH, GENTLEMEN 

jrs of the LAV AT for their 
t xnrws 

E. L. "Doc" Rice, President 



I want to thank all members of the LA VAT for their cooperation and understanding during 
my tenure of preparing the LAV AT NEWS. 



THE LAST WORD 

Drive carefully the other fellow's car may not be paid for either. 



LAV AT SUPPLEMENT 

The Executive Committee has appointed a committee of past presidents to prepare 
a 5-year supplement to the IAVAT history. The committee is made up of I. L. Brakensiek, 
Chairman; Ray Dunn, Secretary; Harold Drake; Keith McGuire; Jesse Keyser; George Irvine; 
and Bill Martinie. 



ALDS, May 1965 



L 



ENTRY BLANK 

IAVAT EXCHANGE -OF -IDEAS CONTEST 

I propose to display the following item(s) in the IAVAT Exchange -of -Ideas Contest at the 
June Conference: 

Class 1 — Field and Shop Aids 



Class 2 — Classroom Aids 



Signed_ 
School 



Return this entry blank to Vocational Agriculture Service, 434 Mumford Hall, Urbana, before 
May 15, 1965. Include plans or copy if you wish to have them duplicated for distribution. 



Wives at June Conference 

I plan to bring my wife to the June Conference to participate in the special programs being 
planned by the wives committee. 

She will arrive 



She will stay until_ 



Signed_ 



School 



Return to Vocational Agriculture Service, 434 Mumford Hall, Urbana, before June 1, 1965. 
AIDS, May 1965 -4- 



(tear sheet) 

TO: Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61803 

Please send the following items: 

Number Price* Amount Item 

Slidefilm 791 - Identification of Weeds (color) 

Slidefilm 206-65 - Testing Milk for Butte rf at 

Slidefilm 340-65 - Illinois Crop-Share Cash Farm Lease 

Slidefilm 401-65 - Diagramming Electrical Wiring Circuits 

Slidefilm 497 - The Safe Care and Use of Ladders 

c 
Guides for Use in Planning Beef Feeding Systems 



2.35 


1.02 


1.16 


1.11 


.88 


. 12 


free 


(per pkg. 
of 20) 

.20 


.20 


.20 


.20 


.20 


.20 


.20 


.20 


.20 


.20 







Soybean Varieties in Illinois for 1965 

Programmed instruction series (for use with Rapid Rater) 
Each of following available in packages of 20: 

107 - Making the Butterfat Test 

108 -Caring for the Sow and Litter at Farrowing Time 

216 - Planning for Sound Land Use 

217 - Developing the Land -Use Plan and Field Layout 

218 - Inventory Your Resources for Farm Planning 

219 - The Soil Fertility Program — Economic Considerations, 

Buildup and Removal 

220 - Capitalism, Socialism and Communism 

408 - Producing Oats 

409 - Controlling Insects of Vegetable Crops 

410 - Planning a Fertilizer Program 



*Prices do not include postage 

Name Schoo 1 

Address 



Billing_ 



AIDS, May 1965 



INDEX TO ITEMS IN VO-AG SERVICE SECTION Page 

No, 

Billing for Agricultural Releases and Advance Orders ................ 1 

Book List Revised ................................ 4 

Grain Judging Contest 3 

Guides for Use in Planning Beef Feeding Systems 3 

Judging Rules .4 

New Bulletins and Circulars 1 

New Rapid Rater Questions 4 

New Slidefilms 2 

New Vo-Ag Service Shop and Storage Building .................... 1 

Opportunity for Student Employment . 2 

Purebred Ram and Ewe Sale and Carcass Show 4 

Return of Surveying Kits ............................. 1 

Rooms for the Conference 1 

Shearing Combs and Cutters for Sale 3 

Soybean Varieties in Illinois for 1965 ........................ 2 

University of Illinois Experimental Field Meetings .................. 3 

Wives Program .................................. 1 

Your 1965 Lamb-Feeding Guide. . 4 



AIDS, May 1965 



PRICE LIST OF FEEDS- 



1/ 



April 20, 1965 



The feed prices for many of the feedstuffs used in vocational agriculture projects are listed 
below. This list is meant to be used as a basis of values for all boys obtaining their feed at 
home. All feed actually purchased should, of course, be recorded at prices paid. 



Kind of feed 



Corn, shelled, bu. .............. 

Corn, ground shelled, bu. .......... . 

Corn, ground ear, bu. ............ 

Oats, bu. .................. 

Oats, ground, bu. .............. 

Barley, (feed) bu. .............. 

Barley, ground or rolled, bu. ........ . 

Sorghum, grain, cwt, ............. 

Sorghum, grain, cracked, cwt. ........ 

Garbage and kitchen waste , ton ......... 

Skim and buttermilk, cwt. ........... 

Whole milk, Grade B, cwt. .......... 

Corn silage, ton 

Sorghum silage, ton. ............. 

Haylage ......... .......... 

Clover and mixed hay ) All hay prices are for 
Alfalfa ) baled hay and straws 

Timothy hay ) Loose hay $5 less per ton 

Oat straw or wheat straw ........... 



1.22 
1.32 
1.32 
.68 
.78 
1.09 
1.19 
2.10 
2.20 
8.50 



1 
3, 



50 
00 



10.00 
9.'00 
11.00 
26.00 
26,00 
24.00 
18.00 



— Prepared by W. W. Albert, Dept. of Animal Science, University of Illinois, Urbana, ILL 



AIDS, May 1965 



VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE SERVICE 

Untvarelty of HUneii - Callage of Agrtcultura 

434 MUMFORD HALL • URBANA, ILLINOIS 



SERIALS DEPARTMENT SSHL 

UNIV OF ILL LIBRARY 



T LL. 



VO-AG AIDS 



Volume 24, Number 1 
August 1965 



bwod (olntty by 
Vocational Agriculture Service, College of Agriculture 

and 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

in Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 



VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 



Welcome to New Teachers , VO-AG ADDS will be sent to you each month and we hope 
that it will be of service to you, In addition to the Vo-Ag Service section, you will find 
sections prepared by the teacher education divisions and your IAVAT president. Special 
features are a page of important dates prepared by the State Office, information for FFA 
reporters, and a page of feed prices for use in keeping farm records. 

We will announce new materials as they become available in the AIDS. In most issues, 
you will find a tear sheet in the back that can be used to order the new items announced 
that month, 

JWM 

Agricultural Releases, Advance Orders for Slidefilms and Units, To date (July 20) we 
have received orders for Agricultural Releases, etc, , from 330 Illinois schools. Please 
keep in mind the October 1 deadline for these advance orders, If you need an order blank, 
please let us know, 

Changes in our Addressograph Plates, We have attempted to bring our addressograph 

plates up to date according to information we have received about teacher changes. 

Please check the name and address on your copy of this issue of the AIDS and notify us 

if there are errors. T „r»» 

JWM 

VAS Order Files Last summer we attempted to furnish each vo-ag department in 
Illinois with a pocket folder containing order forms for all materials available from 
Vocational Agriculture Service and a supply of addressed envelopes. If you do not have 
one of these VAS order files, we will be glad to furnish one for your department if you 
request it. A new supply of revised order forms will be available at your fall section 
meeting. JWM 

Surveying Kits . Surveying kits will be delivered to the odd -numbered sections at their 
fall section meetings, In addition, kits will be available to Sections 2, 14 and 22. This 
was determined from the interest indicated on reports from the section meetings held 

toJune ' JWM 

Judging Contest Scores and Ribbons . The scores and ribbons for the State Judging 
Contests were mailed out on June 24. If you participated in the contests and did not 
receive your scores or ribbons, please let us know and we will duplicate the shipment. 
Winning teams and individuals are reported in the IAVAT section of this issue of the AIDS. 

WHW 

Meat and Milk Judging Contest. Saturday, September 18 is the date for the 1965 State 
Meat and Milk Judging Contest. There will be a card in the September AIDS for you to 
return if you are planning to attend. This is not a definite registration but only a means 
of determining the amount of milk samples, etc. , to prepare. Please watch for the card 
and return it promptly if you are entering teams. WHW 

AIDS, August 1965 -1- 



Extramural Graduate Courses in Agriculture. The departments of the College of Agriculture 
at the University of Illinois have again listed those extramural courses that will be available 
for the first semester, 1965-66 = 



Course 

Agricultural Economics E302 — 
Financing Agriculture 

Horticulture E345 — Growth and 
Development of Horticultural 
Crops 



Agricultural Economics E332 — 
Livestock Marketing; 



Agricultural Economics E302-- 
Financing Agriculture 



Meeting 


Instructor 


Hours 


Units 


Sept. 23 


D. G. Smith 


6:30pm 
Thurs. 


3/4 


Sept, 21 


J. S, Vandemark 

& 
J. P, McCollum 


7:00 pm 
Tues. 


1 



First 
Place 

iSalle 

-P High School 

wm 335) 

sle 

ort. Expto Sta. 
i Morton Arbore- 
al property — \ mi. 
of Ogden Ave . on 
nley Rd. ) 

oline 

r. High School 
00 23 rd Avenue 
x>m B157) 

kin 

'ekin High School 
>om 71) 

)ntiac 

ontiac High School 

)-Ag Shop) 

iringfield 

pr. High School 

US. Lewis St.) 

ae most suitable day and hour for the class can be settled at the first meeting indicated above. A 
tal enrollment of 15 is necessary in order to continue the course. 

lestions concerning the course should be directed to Associate Dean Karl E. Gardner, College of 



Sept. 21 E. E, Broadbent 



Sept. 21 J. M. Holcomb 



Agricultural Engineering E331 — Sept. 
Function, Application, Adjust- 
ment and Management of Farm 
Machinery 



25 D, R. Hunt 



6:30pm 
Tues. 



6:30pm 
Tues. 



9:00 am 
Sat. 



3/4 



3/4 



1/2 



Agricultural Economics E324- 
Farm Operation 



Sept. 23 J. H. Herbst 



6:30 pm 
Thurs. 



3/4 
or 1 



jriculture, University of Illinois, 



KEG 



Agricultural Engineering E381 . Although not listed above, we have word from Dr. E. E. Olver 
that Agricultural Engineering E381, Electro -Mechanical Agricultural Systems could be 
offered if there is a nucleus of interest anywhere that would result in the minimum enrollment 
of 15. This course has been revised to 3/4 unit credit with the following description: 

Application of electric power and mechanical equipment to livestock production, 
crop conditioning, and materials handling systems for efficient use of time, 
power, and labor. Principles of planning materials handling systems; re- 
quirements for environmental control in agricultural production; electric con- 
trols circuits; and factors affecting drying, cooking, and processing of crops. 

If you are interested in attending this course in your area, contact us or Dr. Olver at 

325 Agr. Eng. Bldg. directly. JWM 



AIDS, August 1965 



-2- 



Set Date for College Guest Day, October 23, 1965. The following important notice was 
received from Dean CD. Smith: 

The Enrollment and Student Relations Committee of the College 
of Agriculture has decided to hold the next College Guest Day on Saturday, 
October 23. Their feeling was that high school students now need to make 
their college decisions and apply for admission at least by the middle of 
their senior year, One of the added attractions on that date will be the 
football game between Illinois and Duke University „ Arrangements have 
been made for special discount admission prices for Guest Day visitors „ 
Home Economics Hospitality Day will be held in March next year. The 
committee is looking forward to making this a joint activity in the fall of 
1966o Reserve Saturday, October 23, on your calendars now, and plan to 
bring a busload or two of students to Urbana that day. 

CDS/JWM 

Town and Coun t ry Business Program. We have received the following announcement from 
Dr. R. P. Bentz of the department of Agricultural Economics: 

'The Illinois Town and Country Business Program for youth is now going 
strong in five rural high schools. Involved are Princeville Community 
High School, Timber Township High School. Dunlap Township High School, 
Elmwood Township High School, and Sullivan High School. The program 
reaches both boys and girls and is sponsored by the Department of 
Agricultural Economics of the University of Illinois through county ex- 
tension offices. It was first introduced in Illinois in 1961. The Town and 
Country Business Program is designed to give participants an opportunity 
to explore career possibilities in business related to agriculture and to 
learn through visits and class sessions some of the economics of marketing 
and business. 

M A sample copy of the materials supplied to participants may be obtained from 
the program's coordinator, Professor R. P. Bentz, 305 Mumford Hall, 
University of Illinois, Urbana, Additional copies are available through 
county farm adviser offices," , 

Policy Change Regarding Statements. We are making a change in procedure regarding 
receipting of statements as was announced at the June Conference. After August 1, two 
copies of each statement will be sent. One should be returned to us with payment; the 
other is for the school records. Unless specifically requested , we will not send a 
receipted copy back to the school, This is in line with modern business practice and we 
hope it will not cause any inconvenience. TWM 

Illinois Farm Record Book Materials . The new book (Part I) is expected to be available 
about November 1. Some copies of Part II are available but we do not consider it advis- 
able to send these without Part I. We understand that the College policy will be to charge 
$1.00, which entitles you to get both Parts I and II, with no reduction in price if Part I 
is ordered separately. Whenever the book becomes available, we will carry an announce- 
ment in the AIDS to that effect . 

We expect to use the 1964 Record Problem again this year but will develop a key for the 
new book. The key will be available at about the same time that the new books are avail- 
able. 

JHH 
AIDS, August 1965 -3- 



POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 

Once each year it has been cutomary to review some of the important policies and procedures 
of Vocational Agriculture Service, particularly for new teachers. 

Open Accounts o An open account is maintained for each school in Illinois with a vocational 
agriculture department- We do the same for out-of-state schools that sign up for Agricultural 
Releases. The following apply to open accounts: 

1. Orders totalling less than $10.00 are placed on open account unless 
immediate billing is requested. Statements are normally sent with 
orders that exceed $10, 00, 

2. Whenever open account charges reach $10.00, a statement will be sent. 

3, A statement for Agricultural Releases and advance orders for slidefilms 
will be sent near the end of the school year. Accumulated open account 
charges pending at that time will also be included „ 

4, Schools whose orders total less than $10, 00 for the year will be billed 
for whatever amount is due near the end of the school year. 

Payment of Account s. Unless otherwise directed, statements will be sent to the vocational 
agriculture instructor. We shall appreciate your submitting these statements promptly to 
the proper authority for payment. Checks should be made payable to the University of Illinois 
but sent to Vocational Agriculture Service . 434 Mumford Hall, Urbana, Please notify us 
promptly if you find an error or have any question about your account. 

Shipm e nt of Order s, Most of our shipments are made by United Parcel Service as they will 
pick up at our building and deliver to your school, If you prefer that shipment be made by 
other carrier, please indicate this on your order. 

Participat io n of Agriculture College Staff Members on Off -Campus Meetings . Following are 
the main points in the long-time policy regarding securing speakers from the College of 
Agriculture for adult class meetings: 

1, In order to avoid conflicts and duplication within the county, vocational 
agriculture teachers should confer with local farm adviser before making 
requests for services of staff members, Teachers may then send their 
requests either to Vocational Agriculture Service or direct to the individual 
or department concerned. 

2. It is understood that normally only one speaker will attend any series of 
adult class meetings. 

3, As a general policy, no charge will be made for travel of a speaker unless 
the meeting requires a special trip that, in the opinion of the head of the 
department, would justify such a charge. 

4. A request for a speaker should be made as far as possible in advance of 
the meeting. It is advisable to give alternate dates also. 

Requests for Bulletins and Circulars from the College of Agriculture . We have tried over 
the years to maintain the good relationship that exists between vocational agriculture de- 
partments and the College of Agriculture regarding free distribution of bulletins and circulars 
for class use. Continuation of this good relationship depends on your cooperation in observing 
the following policies: 

AIDS, August 1965 -4- 



1. Send requests to Vocational Agriculture Service for library copies of all 
Illinois bulletins and circulars needed in your program. Requests received 
by the Information Office or other divisions of the College are always re- 
ferred to us which only delays the filling of your order. 

2. Request reasonable numbers of publications which you have previously 
examined and found suitable. Agricultural Release subscribers receive 
a single copy of each new publication as it becomes available. New 
publications are also listed in the AIDS and single copies can be ordered 
for examination by any who do not receive Agricultural Releases. 

3 . We can request that quantities of publications be sent to you only sufficient 
to meet the needs of the size of your classes and it is understood that these 
publications are to become the property of your department. It is College 
policy that distribution to individual farmers is the function of the county 
farm adviser, not the vocational agriculture department. 

4. Quantity distribution of publications is ordinarily governed by a suitability 
rating made by an IAVAT committee. Consideration will be given, however, 
to your special needs if they do not coincide with the general ratings of the 
committee if you justify them . 

5. We can serve you better if you limit your requests to the publications that 
you need in the near future. New publications are coming out all the time 
and it may be that a better publication will be available when you need it, 
rather than to order for the distant future. 

6. Small orders for bulletins and circulars (less than 4 pounds) can be sent 
by franked mail. Larger orders will be sent by Vocational Agriculture 
Service and shipping charges can be added to your open account , 

Charge Orders for Materials from Other Divisions of the College. Items on which there is 
a charge, such as blueprints from the Department of Agricultural Engineering, etc. , can be 
ordered through Vocational Agriculture Service. These departments will charge us for the 
items and we can place the charge on your open account „ 



Dairy Holders Contest . Thirteen boys participated in the Dairy Holders' Contest at the time 
of the Dairy Judging Contest. They were: 

Carol Arnett - Atwood Roger Parr - Mason City 

Dave Beery - Cerro Gordo Tom Pratt - Salem 

Randy Christy - Mason City Robert Presswood - Clinton 

Ron Frere - Taylor Ridge Phil Rich - Oblong 

Ronnie Hall - Ashland Junior Rudsill - Taylor Ridge 

Phillip Kappes - Tuscola Steve Stockdale - Durand 

Bob Metheny - Tuscola 

The winners were: Robert Presswood - Clinton (First) 

Dave Beery - Cerro Gordo (Second) 
Roger Parr - Mason City (Third) 

The winners received medals; all participants received FFA ties. 

WHW 

AIDS, August 1965 -5- 



NEW BOOKS 



The following have been added to our book display since the last issue 
of the AIDS. All of these are available for review in our office. A 
complete listing of the books in our display was sent with the May 1965 
Agricultural Releases. A few copies of this listing are still available 
if you did not get one and wish to request it. 

The books listed below and in future issues of the AIDS, are, of course, 
supplementary to the printed listing. 

Statements about each book are quoted or adapted from information 
furnished by the publisher. If you are interested in securing copies, 
please write directly to the publisher. 



Combines and Combining 1965. $.75 Ohio Vocational Agriculture Instructional Materials 
Service, 2120 Fyffe Road, Columbus, Ohio 43210. 

This 77 -page manual has been developed by the Ohio Vocational Agriculture 
Instructional Materials Service to assist vocational agriculture students in gaining 
knowledge about this important harvesting machine. . . The manual suggests teaching 
procedures and student experiences that would be conducted in the classroom, the agri- 
cultural mechanics shop, and on field trips to fa.rms and implement dealers. 

A 7 -page objective test is also available on this material for 10£ per copy. 

Sawhorse Layout with the Framing Square for School and Home Workshop 1965. $.75 
(quantity discount available). HOBAR Publications, 1305 Tiller Lane. St. Paul, Minnesota. 

This 8 -page booklet on sawhorse layout and construction has been written for the 
vocational agriculture instructor, the 4-H project leader, and the home handyman. . „ It 
contains facts and explanations that could not be included on a simple plan for the same 
sawhorse. 

Maintaining the Home Lighting and Wiring System 1965. $1.50 (quantity discount avail- 
able). Southern Association for Agricultural Engineering and Vocational Agriculture, 
Agricultural Engineering Building, Athens, Georgia. 

This 62 -page publication, prepared initially in 1952, has been revised to include 
the latest information on wiring and lighting maintenance for homes and farms. It shows 
the correct and safe procedures for replacing electrical items that are most likely to 
wear out or give trouble. Quality points to consider in purchasing replacement parts are 
also discussed. Operating principles are explained for: 3 -way switches, 4-way switches, 
grounding receptacles and fluorescent lighting. 



$4,96-3.72. 
53201. 



Bruce Publishing Company, 



Automotive Essentials Ray F. Kuns. 1962. 
400 North Broadway, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

This is a beginner's textbook, based on fundamentals, and contains essential 
automobile information. Exact knowledge of the contents of this text will place the 
student in a position to intelligently select, use, and repair automobiles and automotive 
equipment. 



AIDS, August 1965 



-6- 



Auto -Mechanics Standard -Practice Job Sheets Bostwick, Green and Yergey. 1964 
Bruce Publishing Company, 400 North Broadway, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201. 

Part One - The Engine $1.23/. 93 

Part Two - The Fuel and Electrical Systems $1.23/. 93 

Part Three - The Power Flow $1.23/. 93 

Part Four - The Chassis Units $1.23/. 93 

The Auto -Mechanics Standard -Practice Job Sheets are designed for use in all school 
automotive shops where students learn by doing. They are organized to provide actual job 
experiences in all branches of the auto-mechanic field. 

General Mechanical Drawing Fuglsby, McGee and Sturtevant. 1963, $3.20/2.40. Bruce 
Publishing Company, 400 North Broadway, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201. 

This book provides a, flexible course in general mechanical drawing. The organiza,- 
tion of the book in lesson units, emphasizing information as well as manipulation, is designed 
to provide for a systematic method of instruction. Individual differences are recognized by 
providing at least three levels of difficulty in each lesson. 

Essentials of Mod er n Upholstery. Herbert Bast. 1963. $3.75/3,00. The Bruce Publishing 
Company, 400 North Broadway, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201, 

This work is intended to serve as a textbook in upholstery and to supply the directions 
necessary for producing a. selection of typical jobs. This book should be helpful to retail 
upholstery or reupholstery shops, as well as to the do-it-yourself average man or woman 
who desires to make or repair upholstered furniture. 

General Metals for Technology . Giachino and Schoenhals. 1964, $6.50/5.20. Bruce 
Publishing Company, 400 North Broadway, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201. 

Metalworking is one of the most significant areas of instruction in industrial education. 
Although considerable material already has been written on the subject of metals, much of it 
is not geared to the level of instruction requrred today. This text was prepared to provide 
more fruitful learning opportunities and experiences having greater breadth and depth of 
achievement. 

Machine -Shop Technology . C. A. Felker, 1962. $4.80/3.60. Bruce Publishing Company, 
400 North Broadway, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201. 

The material in this book has been assembled for use in vocational schools, vocational 
departments of general high schools, and apprentice programs. The material is organized 
around shop skills and operation, and the information essential to these skills is included. 

Mechanical Drawing . Edward Berg. 1962. Bruce Publishing Company, 400 North Broadway, 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201. 

Complete volume - Parts 1 and 2, cloth bound - $3.60/2.70 
Part 1 only, paper bound - $1.00/. 75 
Part 2 only, paper bound - $1.24/, 93 

This volume is intended as a secondary school level classroom textbook for the teach- 
ing of mechanical drawing as a part of general education. The book is divided into units of 
instruction with problems to solve. 



AIDS, August 1965 -7- 



The Pipe Fitters and Pipe Welders Handbook . T. W. Frankland. 1955. $3.00/2.40. 
The Bruce Publishing Company, 400 North Broadway, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201. 

This 175-page handbook contains basic information which will enable the pipe 
fitter to solve the difficult problems which he encounters in Ms work. The manual has 
been made small enough for the pipe fitter to carry around in his pocket so that he may 
consult the book whenever he is in need of it. 

Hungry Nations, Paddock and Paddock. 1964. $6.50. Little, Brown and Company, 
Publishers, 34 Beacon St. , Boston. 

This book is an appraisal by a. pair of Washington experts of why our billions 
and the efforts of the underdeveloped nations themselves have failed to produce permanent 
benefits. Following their analysis of the problem, the Paddocks outline a. positive, prac- 
tical solution springing from their grass-roots contact with the struggling nations. 

Introductory Soils . K. C. Berger. 1965. $5.95. The Macmillan Company, 60 Fifth 
Avenue, New York. 

Introductory in nature, this book presents an up-to-date look at the complete 
spectrum of soils. All of the material is specific, with emphasis on information that 
can be applied to practical situations. Introductory Soils traces and discusses the 
origin and formation of soils, their physical, chemical and colloidal properties. Organic 
matter and water in soils and the forms of life found in soils are all fully discussed. 

Herb Gardening . Claire Lowenfeld. 1965, $5.95. Charles T. Branford Company, 
28 Union Street, Newton Centre, Mass. 

This book is based on a great deal of practical experience. The author gives 
advice on the growing of 45 herbs. Both culinary and medicinal aspects are discussed 
thoroughly. She gives instructions on how to make a herb garden, how to grow herbs 
organically, how to harvest and preserve herbs without loss of condition. 

Arc Welding Instructions for the Beginner. H. A. Sosnin. 1964. $2.00. The James F. 
Lincoln Arc Welding Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Arc Welding Instructions for the Beginner attempts to provide training through a 
simplified and concentrated approach to learning fundamentals of the arc welding process 
and understanding and practicing basic manipulative techniques. The simplified approach 
to learning the skills of arc welding on which this text is based can be used for both super- 
vised class instruction and self-instruction. A Teachers Manual for this text is also 
available, priced at $.50. 

Youth at the Wheel. H. T. Glenn. 1965. $4.05. Chas. A. Bennett Co., Inc., 237 North 
Monroe Street, Peoria, Illinois. 

This is a revision of the original work which was published in 1958. It brings 
up-to-date information on safe driving as a basic text in driver education programs. 

Educators Guide to Free Films . 1965. $9.00. Educators Progress Service, Randolph, Wis. 

The twenty -fifth annual edition of Educators Guide to Free Films is a professional 
cyclopedic service on these visual and audiovisual educational media. This edition lists 
4,071 titles of films, 773 of which were not listed in the previous edition. All new titles 
are starred (*). Films cleared for TV are indicated, 

AIDS, August 1965 -8- 











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7 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION / COLLEGE OF EDUCATION / UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Votec 474 Schedule, 1st Sem, 1965-66 . Votec 474, Supervised Agricultural Experience 
Programs, will be taught the first semester of 1965-66 in the Mt Sterling area and in 
the Williamsville area The first class meeting will be held September 21 in the 
Mt. Sterling H,S„ and September 22 in the Williamsville H.S„, 7 to 9 p.m. An attempt 
will be made to schedule the thirty-two hours of instruction in the course in twelve meet- 
ings. The course will not meet the week of the National FFA Convention, Enrollment in 
the course will be handled at the first class session in each center for the course . The 
course will be taught by Professors Phipps and Hemp, 

Summer Session, 1965 . One hundred agricultural education advisees were enrolled in 
the 1965 University of Illinois four-week summer session for agricultural education 
workers. Enrollment in the four Votec courses in agricultural education, taught by 
Agricultural Education Division staff members, was ninety-nine. Fifteen undergraduates 
in agricultural education were enrolled in summer school, Twenty -four of the vocational 
agriculture teachers in summer school were working toward the Advanced Certificate in 
Education degree, The agricultural education enrollment in the 1965 summer session was 
one of the largest recorded, T Tp 

Votec 473 Schedule Changed — The meeting time for Votec 473 has been changed to 
4:00-6:00 p.m. Monday, This change has been made to accommodate teachers in Central 
Illinois who wish to drive to the campus this fall to take this course. If teachers desire, 
the starting time could be moved back to 4:30 p,m, on Monday evenings. 

Registration for Votec 473, Vocational Education in Agriculture for Adults, may be com- 
pleted on Saturday, September 18 from 8:00 a,m, to 12:00 noon, Teachers must register 
on this date or during the preceding three days, according to an alphabetical schedule, in 
order to avoid the late registration fee. 

The first meeting of the class will be held in Room 28 Education Building on Monday, 
September 20, Teachers who wish additional information concerning this course should 
call Professor Paul Hemp at 333-3274 or address inquiries to 358 Education Building. 

PEH 

Placement Report --An acute shortage of newly qualified persons has left twenty schools 
in Illinois without teachers of agriculture. It appears that these schools must locate 
teachers from other states or employ persons not presently in teaching if these twenty 
departments are to be filled. 



PEH 



AIDS, August 1965 



Post -High Vo-Ag , Norm Ehresman, Instructor in Agricultural Education Division, served 
as a consultant to two advisory council meetings June 29 and July 1 at the Wabash Valley 
College, Mt. CarmeL The meetings were held for the purpose of organizing and planning 
the junior college programs in agricultural mechanics and agricultural supply, Both of 
the two year programs will be offered starting in September 1965. Enrollment information 
may be obtained by writing Mr, Robert Irvin, Wabash Valley College, Mt, Carmel, Illinois. 

NH 



AIDS, August 1965 -2- 




Havat 



NEWS 



ILLINOIS ASSN. OF VO-AG TEACHERS 



A few fellow 1AVAT members were initiated into the Illinois Chapter of Gamma 
Sigma Delta, honor society of agriculture, at Urbana, May 10th at the forty-first 
anniversary initiation dinner of the society. Those initiated were Harold W„ Homann, 
William M. Martinie, E, L, Rice, Frank O, Young and Melvin J, Nicol, We are proud 
to have some of our members in this honor society of agriculture 

+ * * * ■ * * 

I feel that the closing words of the president's report submitted by E, L "Doc" 
Rice are worthy of repeating. They are: 'May each of you have enough trials to keep 
you strong; enough sorrow to keep you human; enough hope to keep you happy; enough 
failure to keep you humble; enough success to keep you eager, enough friends to give you 
comfort; enough faith and courage in yourself to banish failure; enough wealth to meet 
your needs; enough determination to make each day a better day than yesterday " 






Re gion IV NVATA Summer Meeting, 
Max Foster, Leroy Lawrence, E. L, Rice, 



Illinois was represented at this meeting by 
George Irvine and Melvin J, Nicol. 



The meeting was held at Leland Lodge, Leland, Michigan, which is a resort 
town on Lake Michigan at the upper end of the lower peninsula, 

States represented were Kentucky, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio and Michigan, 
Each state gave a report and there was discussion on the activities of each state association, 
resulting in a valuable exchange of ideas. 

The Illinois delegates felt that the various states are being directed by capable, 
intelligent and progressive leadership, and are making great strides forward in agricul- 
tural education in a changing world. 

We extend our deepest sympathy to Mr, and Mrs, Carl Brock of Greenville, whose 
daughter was killed in an auto accident in June as she was going home from college. 

The Farmer City FFA chapter has started a nursery near the school campus. They 
have planted shade trees, yews, junipers, arborvitae, ten varieties of flowering shrubs, 
blue, red, and white grapes, black, red, and purple raspberries, dwarf and semi-dwarf 
apple trees, peaches and windbreak trees. They plan to add new specimens each year. 

AIDS, August 1965 



The chapter also has a campus fireplace and recreation area. There is a natural 
rock fireplace flanked with pfitzer junipers; two rock lamp posts and two picnic tables, Elec- 
tricity is available for coffee makers, The area has a backdrop of Austrian pines with a 
screening area of white birch, red bud, forsythia bushes and flowering crab. All work was 
done by chapter members and financed by chapter funds, 

Gene Elliott, vocational agriculture teacher, hopes the plot will get his boys to 
think of areas in agriculture other than farming. Biology classes will use the area for studies. 
Town boys enrolled in agriculture will use the plots for project programs in home beautification. 

Section 5 

Well, June Conference is past and a new year is beginning so perhaps there are 
several things which need to be said, 

First of all we want to congratulate Melvin Nicol and his newly elected fellow officers 
and wish them success during the coming year. Next we want to thank E, L, "Doc" Rice and 
his officers for the fine job they did for us last year. We also would like to thank the program 
committee for the fine conference they had planned 

Best wishes go to those teachers in Section 5 who have found greener pastures 
Among them are Tom Fitzsimmons, Randall Peterson, Gene Weber, W C Legate, and 
Glen Wiley, Good luck fellows, In their place, we welcome Lynn Laible to Wenona and extend 
warm greetings to all other newcomers in our section, 

Max Foster has solved the manure disposal problem in swine He is going to cross 
hogs with cats and let them dig their own holes 

Lynn Gosnell 
Section 5 Reporter 

Agricultural Education Magaz ine In case you have not subscribed you may wish 
to use the following blank: 



(Tear Sheet) 



Interstate Printers & Publishers 
19-27 No Jackson Street 
Danville, Illinois 



Please send the Agricultural Education Magazine to: 



Name 



Address 



Enclosed find check or money order for $3, 00. 



AIDS, August 1965 -2- 



Winners in State Judging Contests 



Livestock 



Ten High Teams 

Galesburg 

Prophetstown 

Farmer City 

Lena 

Sandwich 

Mt. Carroll 

Varna 

Clinton 

Maroa 

Monticello 



Ten High Individuals 



J, Freberg, Galesburg 

G, Benson, Pleasant Plains 

R, Angus, Atkinson 

J. Davis, Forrest 

D, Schick, Maroa 

S, Bailey, Farmer City 

D, Quick, Atwood 

Da Johnson, Sandwich 

G, Reeder, Tuscola 

(Do Bielema, Mt, Carroll 
, . ( T . Rice , Lena 

(C, Malley, Galesburg 

(K, Kunkle, Varna 



Dairy 



Chenoa 

Sullivan 

Bismarck 

Maple Park 

Morrison 

Normal 

Prophetstown 

Pecatonica 

Greenville 

DeKalb 



G. Peterson, Morrison 
W, Johnson, Chenoa 
D, Davis, Edinburg 
J, Harlan, Aledo 
L, Kleiner, Greenville 
R, Lippens, Prophetstown 
Jo., Roeschley, Flanagan 
R. Mueller, St, Charles 

D, Wilke, Durand 

E, Schulz, Varna 



Poultry 



Sterling 

Shelbyville 

Maple Park 

Lena 

Polo 

Pearl City 

O range ville 

Geneseo 

DeKalb 

Moweaqua 



C. Anderson, Maple Park 
R. Hudson, Shelbyville 
K, Finkle, Lena 

L, Ebersole, Sterling 
T, Compton, Shelbyville 

A, Johnson, Sterling 
J. Ethridge, Sterling 
W, Flesner, Shelbyville 

D, Janssen, Pearl City 

B. Suddeth, DeKalb 



Grain 



Shelbyville 

Aledo 

Hillsboro 

Assumption 

Tuscola 

Blue Mound 

Maple Park 

Mt. Morris 

Prophetstown 

Sycamore 

AIDS, August 1965 



D. Compton, Shelbyville 
B. Kleiss, Tuscola 
D. Young, Blue Mound 
N. Brown, Aledo 
J. Birch, Maple Park 
G. Sheely, Mt. Morris 
B. Doty, Blue Mound 
R. Pollock, Assumption 
So Safford, Sycamore 
K. Bryant, Shelbyville 



Following is a list of Public Relations Officers for IAVAT for the coming year, 
These officers should have news articles in to Melvin J. Nicol, Maroa, Illinois by the 10th 
of the month prior to the scheduled month of publication. Example: News for the September 
ADDS should reach Nicol at Maroa by August 10th. 

Nicol would like sections to submit news as follows: 

Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, -July 10, Dec. 10th, 
Sections 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 -Aug. 10, Jan, 10th. 
Sections 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 -Sept, 10, Feb. 10th, 
Sections 16, 17, 18, 19, 20 -Oct. 10, Mar. 10th. 
Sections 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Nov, 10, Apr, 10th, 

News articles will be welcomed from any or all sections at any date in addition to 
the scheduled dates, 

PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICERS - 1965-66 



Section 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 



Name 

Irving Huggins 
Arthur Schick 
Ralph Moens 
James Guilinger 
Lynn Gosnell 
Robert Brown 
George Irvine 
Marion Welles 
John Bartley 
Gary Watt 
Earl Traver 
Paul Cranfill 

Lee D. West 
Leland Ashby , Jr, 
Donald Bateman 
Russell Lewey 
John Smith 
E. L. Bosomworth 
Carl Chapman 
Neil Jolliff 
Richard Petrowich 
B, L, Whittington 
Ardell Kimmel 
William J. Brinkley 



School Address 

Rockton 

Sterling 

Atkinson 

Williamsfield 

Bradford 

DeKalb 

Tonica 

Yorkville 

Saunemin 

Kempton 

Colchester 

Tremont 

Mt. Pulaski 

Gillespie 

LeRoy 

Rantoul 

Georgetown 

Bethany 

Oblong 

Patoka 

New Athens 

Olney 

Campbell Hill 

McLeansboro 



AIDS, August 1965 



-4- 



IAVAT COMMITTEES, 1965-66 



Executive Committee 

M. J, Nicol, Maroa, President 

John Co Baker, Bridgeport, Vice President 

J. W. Berger, Charleston, Sec.-Treas. 

Max Foster, Henry, Dist. 1, Dir. 

Leroy Lawrence, Lockport, Dist. 2, Dir. 

John Sweeney, Williamsville, Dist. 3, Dir. 

Charles Schettler, Wapella, Dist. 4, Dir. 

Max Grinnell, Vandalia, Dist. 5, Dir. 

E. L. Rice, Princeville, Past President 



IVA Educational Exhibit, Max Grinnell 
Orville Bottrell, Crete 
Stuart Montooth, Earlville 

FFA and FFA Foundation, John Sweeney 

Lynn Laible, Wenona 

C. J. Kuster, Normal 

Wo Fortschneider, Jacksonville 

Jerry Kuykendall, Findlay 

Delmar Launius, St„ Jacob, Chairman 



Resolutions, Leroy Lawrence 

Vern Bokemeier, Freeport 

Harry White, Fairbury 

Lee West, Mt, Pulaski 

L. E. Wells, Macon 

B. L. Finley, Benton, Chairman 

Judging Contests, John Sweeney 

Roy Hefty, Orangeville 

Orville Bottrell, Crete, Chairman 

Stanley Klaus, Carlinville 

Henry Slinker, Altamont 

H. C Hendren, Albion 

W. H. Witt, U. of I. 

O. C. Floyd, State Office 

State Fair, John Sweeney 
Edward Behm, Wyoming 
Sherwood Jackson, Seneca 
Henry Gartner, Buffalo, Chairman 
Gene Elliott, Farmer City 



Special Projects, John Baker 
Marvin Damron, Kewanee 
Ronald Siebel, Joliet 
Tom Phelps, Plymouth, Chairman 
Howard Knight, Moweaqua 
Ardell Kimmel, Campbell Hill 
Ao L, Utech, State Office 
J. H. Herbst, U. of L 

Newsletter 

M, J. Nicol, Maroa 

E. Lo Rich, Princeville, Chairman 

Curriculum Study, Max Foster 
Robert Liehr, Morrison, Chairman 
Gifford Zimmerman, Flora 
Albert Liehr, Manito 

IVA Program 

M. J. Nicol, Maroa 

John Baker, Bridgeport 



IVA Legislation, Max Grinnell 
Eldon Witt, Roanoke, Chairman 
Burdette Graham, Macomb 
Jesse Keyser, Lawrenceville 
William Martinie, Minonk 
AlKrebs, U. of I. 

Agricultural Education Advisory, Max Foster 

Dean Finch, Forreston 

Maynard Boudreau, Clifton, Chairman 

Fred Russell, Canton 

Marcel Heiman, Teutopolis 

Richard Lowe, St. Elmo 

Vo-Ag Service Advisory, Max Foster 

Charles Pearson, Toulon 

Gayle Wright, Forrest 

Burdette Graham, Macomb, Chairman 

Russell Lewey, Rantoul 

Kenneth Poole, Salem 



Public Information, Leroy Lawrence 

James Becker, Amboy 

John Olson, Kirkland, Chairman 

Dorr Simer, Beason 

Kenneth Knell, Mahomet 

Richard Petrowich, New Athens 

G. D. Coil, State Office 

IVA Representative 
E. L. Rich, Princeville 
M. J. Nicol, Maroa 
William Martinie, Minonk 

Banquet, Charles Schettler 

Clark Esarey, Tolono 

Lowell Hillen, Champaign 

Kermit Esarey, St. Joseph, Chairman 



Research, Charles Schettler 
Don Higgs, Streator 
Arthur Eicken, Carrollton 

IAVAT Educational Exhibit, Max Grinnell 
Gene Buhrmester, Monticello 
Russell Lewey, Rantoul, Chairman 
James Rohl, Newman 
A, H. Krebs, U. of I. 

IAVAT Awards, Charles Schettler 
George Irvine. Tonica, Chairman 
John Hunt, Beardstown 
Shaw Terwilliger, Virginia 

Professional Committee, Leroy Lawrence 

Keith McGuire, Polo 

Daren Cox, Pontiac 

Jesse Keyser, Lawrenceville, Chairman 

IVA Commercial Exhibits. M a x Grinnell 

Bob Daniel, Waterman 

Wm, Marshall. St. Charles 

Bob Howey, Sycamore, Chairman 

Agri-Business Relations Committee, Max Foster 

Eo L„ Rice, Princeville, Chairman 

C, M, Gowler, Centralia 

Bob Rohlfing, Paxton 

Frank Young, Washington 

Robert Van Rheeden . New Lenox 



INDEX TO ITEMS IN VO-AG SERVICE SECTION 

Page 

Agricultural Engineering E381 ........................ 2 

Agricultural Releases , Advance Orders for SlidefUms and Units. ......... 1 

Changes in our Addressograph Plates ..................... 1 

Dairy Holders Contest. ........................... 5 

Extramural Graduate Courses in Agriculture ................. 2 

Illinois Farm Record Book Materials ..................... 3 

Judging Contest Scores and Ribbons ..................... 1 

Meat and Milk Judging Contest ........................ 1 

New Books ...... ........................... 6 S 7 S 8 

Open Accounts ............................... 4 

Participation of Agriculture College Staff Members on Off-Campus Meetings . , . 4 

Payment of Accounts ......... *_..............,.... . 4 

Policies and Procedures .......................... 4, 5 

Policy Change Regarding Statements ..................... 3 

Requests for Bulletins and Circulars from the College of Agriculture ...... 4,5 

Set Date for College Guest Day , October 23 , 1965 ............... 3 

Shipment of Orders ............................. 4 

Surveying Kits ............................... 1 

Town and Country Business Program ...........a......,,.. 3 

VAS Order Files .............................. 1 

Welcome to New Teachers .......................... 1 



AIDS, August 1965 



PRICE LIST OF FEEDS 



1/ 



The feed prices for many of the feedstuffs used in vocational agriculture projects are 
listed below. This list is meant to be used as a basis of values for all boys obtaining 
their feed at home. All feed actually purchased should, of course, be recorded at prices 
paid. 



Kind of feed 

Corn, shelled, bu. ...... . 

Corn, ground shelled, bu 

Corn, ground ear, bu . 

Oats, bu. . 

Oats, ground, bu. ....... 

Barley, (feed) bu 

Barley, ground or rolled, bu. . . 
Sorghum, grain, cwt. . . . . . . 

Sorghum, grain, cracked, cwt.. . 
Garbage and kitchen waste, ton. . 
Skim and buttermilk, cwt. .... 

Whole milk, Grade B, cwt. . . . 

Corn silage, ton . 

Sorghum silage, ton. ...... 

Haylage 

Clover and mixed hay) All hay prices are for • 
Alfalfa ) baled hay and straws 

Timothy hay ) Loose hay $5 less per ton 

Oat straw or wheat straw ........... 



May 24 


June 21 


July 20 


$ 1.26 


$ 1.26 


$ 1.20 


1.36 


1.36 


1.30 


1.36 


1.36 


1.30 


.72 


.70 


.68 


.82 


.80 


.78 


1.12 


1.06 


1.06 


1.22 


1.16 


1.16 


2.12 


2.15 


2.12 


2.22 


2.25 


2.22 


8.50 


8.50 


8.50 


1.50 


1.50 


1.50 


3.00 


3.00 


3.00 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


9.00 


9.00 


9.00 


11.00 


11.00 


10.00 


24.00 


22.00 


20.00 


24.00 


22.00 


20.00 


22.00 


20.00 


18.00 


18.00 


16.00 


16.00 



1/ 



Prepared by W. W. Albert, Dept. of Animal Science, University of Illinois, Urbana 



Pasture Rates 


Cost per day 


*Calves and colts: 




6-11 months 


$.06 


12-24 months 


$.09 


over 24 months 


$.12 


Lambs to weaning 


$.01 


Sheep - yearlings and mature 


$.025 


Pigs, 50 to 100 lbs. 


$.0025 



*Reduce by 2/3 for fuU-fed cattle 
*Reduce by 1/3 for limited fed cattle 



AIDS, August 1965 



VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE SERVICE 

Unlvartity of llllnoli ■ ColUg* of Agriculture 

434 MUMFORD HALL • URBANA, ILLINOIS 



SERIALS 

UMIV OF ILL LIBRARY 



SSHL 



v^ 



ILL 
Of 2. 



VO-AG AIDS 



hdversityofiu 

°CT 22 1365 
UBHAHy 

Volume 24, Number 2 
September 1965 



tawed folntty by 
VocaHonal Agriculture Service, College of Agriculture 

and 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

in Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 



VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 



In-Service Courses Scheduled , The following courses have been requested and are tentatively 
scheduled. Teachers in the sections involved will be notified directly but in most cases there 
is room for a few additional teachers from nearby sections who may be interested. If you are 
from outside the section and wish to attend, please notify Vocational Agriculture Service at 
once. We will then notify the host school so that they can plan on you and will send you last 
minute detail s. 









Starting 




Date 


Course 
Surveying 


Place 

Shabbona 


time 
9 a , m 


Sectioi 


September 4 


7 


September 9 


Electrical Controls 


Bloomington 


3 p m. 


9 


September 11 


Crop Drying 


Stillman Valley 


8:30 am 


1 


September 16 


Small Engines 


Urbana 


2 p.m. 


17 


September 23 


Electrical Controls 


Ridgway 


4 p.m.. 


25 


September 30 


Electrical Controls 


Rochelle 


4 p . m , 


7 


October 2 


Surveying 


Eldorado 


9 a.m. 


25 


November 1 


New Farm Acct. Book 


Freeport 


5 p.m. 


1 


November 8 


New Farm Acct. Book 


Waverly 


6 p.m. 


15 


November 13 


Surveying 


Forrest 


9 a.m. 


9 



JWM 



Extramural Graduate Courses in Agriculture 

Courses Previously Announced in August AIDS: 



First 



Course 

Agr. Economics E302 - 
Financing Agriculture 

Horticulture E345 - 
Growth and Develop- 
ment of Hort, Crops 

Agr. Economics E332 - 
Livestock Marketing 

Agr. Economics E302 - 
Financing Agriculture 

Agr. Engineering E331 - 
Farm Machinery 

Agr. Economics E324 - 
Farm Operation 

AIDS, September 1965 



Place 


Meeting 




Instructor 


Time 


Units 


LaSalle 
(L-P H.S. 
Room 335) 


Sept. 23 


D. 


G Smith 


6:30 pm 
Thurs. 


3/4 


Lisle (Hort, 
Exp. Sta. on 
Morton Arbor- 
etum Property) 


Sept. 21 


J. S, Vandemark 
& J. P, McCollum 


7 p.m. 
Tues, 


1 


Moline(Sr. H.S 
3600 23rd Ave. 
Room B157) 


. .Sept. 21 


E. 


E, Broadbent 


6:30 pm 
Tues 


3/4 


Pekin (H.S. , 
Room 21) 


Sept. 21 


J. 


M. Holcomb 


6:30 pm 
Tues 


3/4 


Pontiac (H. S . , 
Vo-Ag Dept. ) 


Sept. 25 


D„ 


R. Hunt 


9 am 
Sat. 


1/2 


Springfield 
(Spr, H.S., 101 
S. Lewis) 


Sept. 23 


Jo 


H. Herbst 


6:30 pm 
Thurs. 


3/4 
or 1 



-1- 



New Courses Announced for First Time 1 



First 



Course 

Agr. Engineering E381 - 
Electro -Mechanical 
Agr. Systems 

Agr. Economics E303 - 
Agr. Law 



Place 


Meeting 


Instructor 


Time 


Units 


Morris (H.S. 
Vo-Ag Dept.) 


Sept. 22 


E. F, Olver 


6:30 pm 
Wed, 


3/4 


Newton (H,S. 
Vo-Ag Dept.) 


Sept. 20 


N. G. P. Krausz 


6 pm 
Mon, 


1/2 



Revised Order Forms. Revised order forms listing most of the materials available from 
Vocational Agriculture Service are being delivered to teachers attending odd-numbered fall 
sectional meetings, They have been sent to all other Illinois vo-ag departments. If you did 
not receive a set of these new order forms, and wish one, space has been provided on a tear 
sheet in the back of this issue of the ADDS for your request twm 



FFA Roadside Signs. Funds have been provided by the Illinois Foundation FFA to furnish 
about 45 sets of new or replacement FFA roadside signs during the school year 1965-66. 
Sets are being prepared for 15 schools who completed their applications last year, as follows: 



Annawan 


Mendon 


St. Elmo 


DeKalb 


New Lenox 


Sparland 


Jamaica (Sidell) 


Odin 


Somonauk 


Havana 


Olney 


Trenton 


McLeansboro 


Rankin 


Williamsfield 



These schools need do nothing further but will be notified when the signs are ready. 

The following 22 schools applied for sets of signs and have been contacted by letter to secure 
further information necessary to prepare the signs. They will be given priority if they send 
this information back before October 1. 



Aledo 

Atwood 

Beason 

Benton 

Campbell Hill 

Edwardsville 

Fairview 

Hillsboro 



Lawrenceville 

Little York 

Malta 

Mansfield 

Metropolis 

Murphysboro 

Nauvoo 



Palmyra 

Pekin 

Pinckneyville 

Robinson 

Sullivan 

Ullin 

Wapella 



This leaves about 8 sets of signs that can be ma,de available to schools in the order in which 
they apply. It is possible, also, that some of the group of 22 above may not follow through so 
that more than 8 new applications could be handled. If you are interested, an application is 
contained on the tear sheet. 

JWM 



AIDS, September 1965 



-2- 



Meat and Milk Judging Contests will be held at the U„ of L campus, September 18 ; start- 
ing at 10:00 a.m. Please register at the Stock Pavilion in time for the boys to be at their 
respective places before judging time. 

Attached to this copy of the AIDS is a self -addressed card for you to return if you plan to 
bring a team. This is not a preregist ration, but a means of determining the number of 
teams to prepare for. Please return this card immediately if you expect to bring one or 
both teams. 

A list of rings for each contest was included in the Judging Contest Rules sent to you last 
ApriL If you have misplaced your copy, we still have a few and would be glad to send you 
another one as long as the supply lasts. 

Illinois is playing a home football game that day, starting at 1:30 p.m., It will rush us, but 
we will make every effort to finish in time so teachers and boys may attend if they so desire, 
General admission tickets may be purchased that day for $L00 each. These are good for 
teachers and/or boys. 

Agriculture College Guest Day, October 23. You will be getting, sometime this month, a 
poster and news story to support your promotional efforts on College Guest Day scheduled 
for Saturday, October 23 in Urbana. The committee in charge has scheduled time for 
visitors to attend two 50-minute special interest sessions in field of his choice. Members 
of the teaching staff of the College of Agriculture will discuss courses of study and career 
opportunities in 13 different fields of study during these sessions. Advisers will meet to- 
gether in a session of their own to learn about career opportunities in agriculture. Special 
information stations will be available on the first floor of Mumford Hall where parents and 
prospective students can get specific information about admissions, scholarships, and hous- 
ing. A prime motivator ought to be the chance to attend the afternoon football game between 
the Fighting Illini and Duke University at a special price of $1.00 per ticket to students and 
the adults who attend the morning program. 

JWM 

New Slidefilms . Six new color slidefilms are being sent to all schools that have advance 
orders for new slidefilms, as follows: 

181-65 Identification of Kinds of Meat 

182-65 Identification of Pork Cuts 

183-65 Identification of Beef Cuts 

184-65 Identification of Lamb Cuts 

732 Corn Diseases in Illinois 

794 Controlling Giant Foxtail 

If you have an advance order and do not receive these films early in September, please let 
us know. Schools sending in advance orders between now and October 1 (deadline date) will 
receive this shipment of films immediately. These films will be available to others after 
October 1. A tear sheet for ordering them will be included in the October AIDS 

RLC 

Revised Land-Use Selection Cards . These cards for land-use selection contests are 
available from Vocational Agriculture Service at 25 cents per package of 25, plus postage. 
The cards were revised this year and are based on information in Illinois Circular 758, 
"Understanding Soils"(Rev.-Nov 64). This item is listed on the tear sheet for the con- 
venience of those who may wish to order. 

RLC 

AIDS, September 1965 -3- 



NEW AGRICULTURE VOCATIONS FILM , A new 15 -minute 16 mm, color film entitled 
"Vocations in Agriculture" is now available for use by vocational agriculture teachers .. In the 
film, six high school students take time off from an afternoon swim to discuss their futures in 
the specialized and highly competitive world of work. Only one of the students comes from a 
farm background, but they all have considered the broad field of agriculture. 

The film discusses at least two promising career opportunities in each of the following areas: 
agricultural research, agricultural engineering, communications, business practice, con- 
servation, education, services, and farming and ranching. 

Extension Editors TV editor John Woods, who was the educational consultant for the film pro- 
duced by Gilbert Altschul Productions, Inc. , Chicago, says that it may be useful in some of 
your career days programs, 

You can get it from the Audio -Visual Film Library at 704 South 6th Street, Champaign., Rental 
fee is $5. 00 per five-day period starting on a Monday, 

GK 

NEW BOOKS 



The following have been added to our library since the last 
issue of the AIDS All of our books are available for review 
in our office by those interested. As long as the editions 
are current, they will be included in such exhibits as the 
one at the Annual Conference of Vocational Agriculture 
Teachers. 



EDUCATORS GUIDE TO FREE FILMSTRIPS 1965, $6.00. Educators Progress Service, 
Randolph, Wisconsin. 

The following is adapted from information furnished by the publisher: 

'The seventeenth annual edition of Educators Guide to Free Filmstrips is a 
professional, cyclopedic service on filmstrips and slides, This service is 
devoted entirely to free filmstrips and slides. This edition lists 506 titles, 
including 80 sets of slides. Of the 506 titles, 83 were not listed in the six- 
teenth edition. All new titles are starred (*)„ All told more than 40,000 
separate frames or pictures, or miniature posters, from 100 different 
sources are brought to you." 

EDUCATORS GUIDE TO FREE TAPES, SCRIPTS AND TRANSCRIPTIONS 1965 , $5,75 
Educators Progress Service, Randolph, Wisconsin, 

Publishers foreword includes the following: 

"The twelfth edition is completely new and is devoted exclusively to selected 
free tapes, free scripts, and free transcriptions, This edition lists, 
classifies, and provides complete information on sources, availability, and 
contents of 237 free tapes, 116 free scripts, and 165 free transcriptions, a 
total of 518 valuable materials. Of these, 121 are new starred ( + ) titles." 



AIDS, September 1965 -4- 















































\— 








1 1 




























1 1 




































EZ U 








AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION / COLLEGE OF EDUCATION / UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Registration Procedure for Votec 474. Registration for Votec 474, Supervised Agricultural 
Experience Programs, will be conducted for teachers attending the course at the Brown 
County High School, Mt, Sterling, in the Vocational Agriculture classroom, 7 p.m. , 
September 21, 1965., Registration will be conducted for teachers attending the course at 
Williamsville in Room 4 of the high school, 7 p,m , September 22, 1965, An attempt 
will be made to schedule at. each center the thirty-two hours of instruction in the course 
in twelve meetings. The course will not meet the week of the National FFA Convention. 
The course will be taught by Professors Phipps and Hemp and will be designed to assist 
teachers to qualify for the organizing and conducting of supervised agriculture experience 
programs involving employment and related experiences 

LJP 

Registrat ion Procedure for V o tec 47 3, Registration for Votec 473, Vocational Education 
in Agriculture for Adults, may be completed on Saturday, September is from 8:00 a = m, 
to 12:00 noon., The course will be taught by Professor Hemp from 4:00-6.00 p m, each 
Monday on campus during the first semester of 1965-66. This course should be of special 
interest to teachers within driving distance of the Urbana campus. It is one of the basic 
courses in agricultural education in which most teachers of agriculture enroll. Its content 
will be directed toward the implementing of the Vocational Education Act of 1963 as it 
applies to adult education. 

If teachers enrolled desire the starting time of the class could be moved to 4 30 p.m. on 
Monday evening, The first meeting of the class will be held in Room 28, Education Building 
on Monday, September 20. Teachers who wish additional information concerning this 
course should call Professor Paul Hemp at 333-3274 or address inquiries to 358 Educa- 
tion Building 

LJP 



Fir st -Year T eachers ' Cours e There is still time to enroll in Votec 370 an extramural 
course for new or returning teachers of agriculture Beginning teachers men returning 
to teaching from other work, and out-of-state teachers employed for the first time in 
Illinois are eligible to enroll for one-half unit of graduate credit. Four evening meetings 
will be held at centers convenient to the enrollees In addition, each enrollee will be 
visited by the instructors^ The course will be concerned with problems usually encountered 
during the first year of work in Illinois Dr Robert Warmbrod Dr Gerald R Fuller 
and Norman Ehresman are teaching the course ; Interested persons may enroll by con- 
tacting Robert. Warmbrod. Gerald Fuller, or Norman Ehresman, 347 Education Building, 



University of Illinois 



LJP 



AIDS, September 1965 



Vocational Agriculture Summer Experience Program --Votec 275 o Student teachers for 
1965-66 at the University of Illinois participated during the latter half of August in a two- or 
three-week summer experience program. They obtained experiences in the summer work 
of an agriculture teacher and participated in the opening of school at their student teaching 
centers. Dr„ A, FL Krebs supervised the students enrolled in Votec 275, 

LJP 



AIDS, September 1965 



.! 



ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRiC 

NORMAL, ILLINOIS 61761 




AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



Summer Experience in Agricultural Education--Agr, 295 . Student teachers are now 
participating in a three-week summer experience program in vocational agriculture 
departments. The students will participate in the summer work of a teacher of voca- 
tional agriculture and the opening of school in their student teaching centers, The 
schools with cooperating teachers providing experience programs in their departments 
and students are as follows: 



Student teacher 

Robert Maxwell 
David Shaffer 
Marshall Dennis 
Dale Henze 
James Stevens 
David Manning 
Gary Brucker 
Larry Martin 
Howard Zimmerman 
George Dixon 
Myron, Otto 
Gregory Patton 
Benjamin Long 
William Goodlick 
Steve Bartmess 
George Ginder 
Loren Hickenbottom 
Leonard Sigler 



School 

D wight 

Eureka 

Kirkland 

Maroa-Forsyth 

Maroa-Forsyth 

Morris 

Morris 

Normal Community 

New Lenox 

New Lenox 

Pontiac 

Pontiac 

Princeville 

Streator 

Streator 

Wapella 

Washington 

Williamsfield 



Cooperating teacher 

R, Glenn Willard 
Arthur Phillips 
John M. Olson 
Melvin Nicol 
Melvin Nicol 
Donald Kaufman 
Donald Kaufman 
Clarence Kuster 
Robert R Van Rheeden 
Robert R, Van Rheeden 
Daren Cox 
Daren Cox 
EL. Rice 
Donald Higgs 
Donald Higgs 
Charles L„ Schettler 
Frank Young 
James Guilinger 



Cooperating Teachers Conference The Summer Cooperating Teachers Conference in 
Agricultural Education was held in the University Union at Illinois State University on 
August 23 . In addition to the cooperating teachers listed above under summer experi- 
ence, Howard Cotter, Donald Bateman, Gordon Sarb, and Ralph Guthrie also attended, 
Dr. Harvey S. Woods welcomed the group to the campus, Dr, Cecelia Lauby, Director 
of Professional Laboratory Experience, ISU, discussed the standards of student teaching 
Dr. Kenneth E. James served as chairman and Mr Charles Schettler served as secretary 

Placement Report Eighteen students qualifying to teach vocational agriculture during 
the academic year, 1964-65, accepted positions to teach vocational agriculture in Illinois 



AIDS, September 1965 



Attend Research Conference , Dr. Kenneth E James attended the Central Regional Research 
Conference in Agricultural Education held August 4-7 on the campus of the University of 
Wisconsin, He served as secretary for the committee working on High School Programs 
in Agricultural Education Leading to Off-Farm Agricultural Occupations 



AIDS, September 1965 



ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

NOR AL, ILLINOIS 61761 




AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 




IAVAT 



NEWS 



ILLINOIS ASSN. OF VO-AG TEACHERS 



NOTE: Included in this issue of the AIDS is an important report from your IVA Legislative 
Committee , I hope you will take time to read it carefully and if you have any 
reactions, please send them to Eldon Witt, chairman, or to any of the committee 
members, 

^ T + * * + 

At the July meeting your executive board voted to hold the meat and milk judging 
contest in the spring of 1966. April 2 was the suggested date A contest will still be held 
this fall as scheduled , 

The executive committee also voted to have a history of the IAVAT published. The 
history will be published in one book and brought up to the present date The book should 
be ready by our next conference. We should extend our thanks to our IAVAT history com- 
mittee, I. L, Brakensiek, chairman, for their efforts to give us a fine history,, Our thanks 
should also go to Vo. Ag Service for printing the history, 

The National Association news letter reports a new program for NVATA members 
initiated by A, O. Smith - Harvestore Corporation They will select an outstanding teacher 
of vocational agriculture from each of the six NVATA regions The awards will consist of 
an all -expense paid trip to the National Convention at Miami plus an agricultural tour of the 
United States. 

Each association may select one teacher to apply for the award Application forms 
are being prepared and an announcement of rules will be made in the near future 

Some dates for you to remember 

IVA Convention, Chicago --March 10, 11, 12, 1966 
State FFA Convention — June 14, 15, 16, 1966 
IAVAT Conference -- June 8, 9. 10, 1966 (tentative) 
State Judging Contest — June 22, 1966 (tentative) 

+ t * * * * 



AIDS, September 1965 



If you appreciate your d - Con diary why don't you write a letter of appreciation to 
Hamilton Hicks, Educational Director, The d - Con Company, 1450 Broadway, New York 18, N.Y, 

The Charles Pfizer Company will make a $500 cash award to the instructor, if he is 
an NVATA member, of the National FFA winner in Dairy Farming, Poultry Farming, and 
Livestock Farming. This will be effective as of this year. Winners will be announced at the 
Miami Convention. 

Our NVATA executive committee at their meeting in Chicago recommended that a 
constitutional amendment be considered at the Miami Convention to increase dues from $3.00 
to $5.00 and Student dues from $.75 to $1.00. The increase would become effective July 1, 1966. 

****** 

Did you know that 

The Michigan Ag. Teachers Association gives a plaque to the ag. teacher doing the 
best job of public relations. 

Most states are reporting a serious shortage of Vo. Ag. Teachers. 

Our dues are the lowest of any state association in Region IV. Michigan teachers pay 
$25.00 annual dues; Missouri, $23; Indiana, $21.50; Kentucky, $21.00; Ohio, $19.50. 

The Illinois Association has a new committee this year. It is the Agri, -Business 
Relations Committee and consists of E. L. Rice, Chairman, C. M. Gowler, Bob Rohlfing, 
Frank Young, and Bob Van Rheeden. 

The IVA Legislative Committee has been expanded this year. Members are Eldon 
Witt, chairman, Burdette Graham, Jesse Keyser, William Martinie and Al Krebs. 

****** 
SECTION 14 NEWS: 

The vocational agriculture teachers of Section 14 met on August 3 and 4 to take full 
scale soil monoliths of the 12 or 13 important soils of the section. 

Roger Courson, Voc, Agr. Service, conducted the tour and was in charge of the soil 
coring machine. A number of farm advisers, assistant farm advisers and Federal Land Bank 
Managers and Appraisers were with the group at different times on the two -day tour. 

Section 14 teachers welcomed Max Muirhead, a new teacher to the section. He is 
teaching at Hliopolis, The teachers also welcomed the presence of Melvin Nicol to the 
Livestock Short Course held in Lincoln High School on July 30. Robert Dorch served as host 
and also very ably conducted the course. 

Lee D. West 

Section 14 Public Relations Officer 

SECTION 12 NEWS: 

The Section 12 vo. ag. teachers met for their summer meeting with a pot luck at 
the Mineral Springs Park in Pekin on Friday, July 16, with Bill Dowell as host. Final plans 
were made for the Section 12 vo. ag. fair, and entries were received. Plans were finalized 
for a Section 12 FFA camp to be held at Camp Emmanuel at Astoria on August 20-21. 

AIDS, September 1965 -2- 



The Section 12 Vo, Ag„ Fair was held at Lewistown on July 27. The total number 
of entries was down, but the quality was high in all divisions, and the show gave evidence to 
the public that Future Farmers are still farming and improving livestock. 

Paul W, Cranfill 

Section 12 Public Relations Officer 

SECTION 7 NEWS: 

Clarence Tipton, Serena, fair manager for the Section 7 fair at Ottawa, reported a 
total of 765 entries, including 348 in swine, 173 in beef, 123 in sheep, 58 in dairy, 29 in 
poultry and 9 miscellaneous,, 

Mr. Tipton was able to line up 12 business men in the section to donate trophies 
to champions in the various livestock divisions. One of our old buddies, Maynard Boudreau , 
was sheep judge. 

Alfred Herstrum and Gordon Sarb gave a fine summarization of the Animal Science 
Short Course for teachers of Section 7 at Streator with Don Higgs as host. The group met 
in Rokey's air-conditioned dance room, 

(Editor's note - I wonder about these toys) 

Congratulations and good luck are extended to James Kunz , Serena, He was married 
in June and is back on the job "fit as a fiddle." 

♦ * * » * t 

An interesting custom was observed at the Regional IV NVATA conference in Leland 
Michigan in June. 

Every day at 10:00 A.M, the fire whistle blows and every able bodied man in town 
reports to the fire house for a 20 minute coffee break, 

The Illinois delegation responded to the invitation to at tend the coffee break and 
were presented official membership cards to the International Coffee Club of America, 
home office, Leland, Michigan. 

If more places in the country observed such a custom we might have less strokes 
and heart attacks. 

Section 7 held their fall meeting in Earlville August 6 with Stewart Montooth as 
host. Chairman Don Kaufman of Morris introduced new teachers in the section They 
are Bob Daniel, Waterman; Jack Niles, Shabbona , and Raymond Lett, Sandwich Present 
at the meeting were Allan U tech. State Office; John Matthews, Voc Agr Service, and 
Gary Hansel, Section 7 FFA vice-president, Lostant. 

George Irvine 

Section 7 Public Relations Officer 

+ T * T -f- * 



AIDS, September 1965 



Meet Your Directors -- 
Max Grinnell, Director, District V 

Max Grinnell was born on a livestock and orchard farm in Johnson Co, , Illinois and 
graduated from Vienna Township High School Upon graduation from high school, he farmed 
for about three years. During this time he began his college work at Southern Illinois University, 
He obtained an elementary certificate and taught grade school at Buncombe for two years „ 
While teaching he continued to farm on the home farm until he became a full time student at 
the University of Illinois. 

He graduated from the College of Agriculture, University of Illinois in 1941 with a 
major in Ag. -Ed* 

In the spring of 1941 he was employed off the campus by Fairbanks Morse & Co and 
spent 2,\ years in industry as a sales representative and as an Employer Interviewer in the 
Cincinnati, Ohio area. 

Max served 3 years and 4 months in the U S. Navy during World War II as a Classi- 
fication Specialist, 

Upon discharge from the Navy . he was invited to return to Illinois by his friends, 
Df: Alex Reed persuaded Max to go to Brownstown and take the job he was leaving to go to 
Southern, Max taught Vo-Ag at Brownstown for 18 years and is now in his second year at 
Vandal ia. 

His wife, Polly, is a graduate of McMurray College with a major in Music She is 
an accomplished pianist and organist and teaches vocal music in the Vandalia schools. 

His hobby is foxhounds and hunting. He spends his free time raising, fitting and 
showing Walker foxhounds. He is a recognized judge of hounds and judges several shows in 
the midwest each year when time permits. 

Max believes teaching Vo-Ag is a most rewarding profession. He recommends it 
to his graduates, It is with great pride that he looks back and sees his boys successful in 
their farming, teaching and in ag-related fields He is proud to be a teacher of Vo-Ag„ 

Meet Your District Directors -- 

Max Foster, Director District I 

Max Foster was elected to a two-year term as Director of District I of LAVAT in 
June 1965. Max is in his 6th year as a teacher of vocational agriculture at Henry High School 
and taught three years previously at Hennepin High School 

He was raised on a farm south of Cuba. Illinois, and attended high school at Cuba 
High School studying vocational agriculture under the late W= R Queen. He graduated from 
high school in 1948 and attended Illinois State Normal for one year, The following year he 
farmed at home and attended Western University at Macomb, 

In 1951 Max enlisted in the Air Force and served as a radio repairman for four 
years. Upon l'eceiving his discharge, Max enrolled at the University of Illinois and graduated 
in 1957., He received his Master's degree from the same institution in 1960 and has completed 
one-half his work on an Advanced Certificate. 

In 1955 he married Eunice Clayberg of Cuba and they have three children — Rock Alan 8, 
Robert Max 6, and Douglas Gene 5. He is a member of the Henry Methodist Church and Masonic 
Lodge of Henry ***,,* 

AIDS, September 1965 -4- 



SECTION 16 NEWS: 

The Section 16 Livestock and Grain Fair was held at Decatur on August 5, 1965, 
17 of the 18 schools in the section had one or more exhibitors. 135 boys entered 551 dif- 
ferent classes. 

Due to the absence of Charley Schettler, Wapella, the swine superintendent, we 
had to install a P. A. system for the swine department this year. 

Don Prather, Cerro Gordo, as well as Schettler, was also fulfilling his military 
obligations to Uncle Sam. 

Fred Sistler, son of David Sistler, Arthur, and two friends are headed for an extended 
vacation in California and other western states. 

Paul Brewer, son of Oscar Brewer , Atwood, is enrolled in the Ag. Business 
curriculum at Mt. Carmel for the coming year. 

Lynn Spaid, Tri -Valley, and Larry Carder from Maroa are going to Joliet. 
Don Golden and Stephen Sigler from LeRoy have also applied for entrance to Joliet. 

DonSargeant, Tri-Valley. Gene Buhrmester, Monticello, Oscar Ingram, Bement, 
Al Bain, Saybrook-Arrowsmith and Don Bateman, LeRoy attended the Geigy workshop held 
in Champaign July 22nd. It was a day well spent, 

Fifteen teachers from the section attended the animal science course taught by Rich 
and Smith in Monticello, July 27th. The teachers not attending had other business obligations 
that day. It was a very educational day. 

Tri-Valley FFA had a very successful day at their annual tractor pull held July 25th 
at Downs. 

The section had several girls enrolled in Voc. Agr, last year. Some exhibited at the 
fair. 

Don Bateman 

Section 16 Public Relations Officer 

^f. +: -jf ^ ^ :fc 

Agricultural Education Magazine. In case you have not subscribed you may wish 
to use the following blank: 

(tear sheet) 

Interstate Printers & Publishers 
19-27 N. Jackson Street 
Danville, Illinois 



Please send the Agricultural Education Magazine to: 



Name 



Address 



Enclosed find check or money order for $3. 00. 
AIDS, September 1965 -5- 



(tear sheet) 



TO: Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61803 



Please send the following items: 



Number 



Price * 
.25 
no chg„ 



Amount 



Land Use Selection Cards (pkgs. of 25) 
Set of Revised Vo-Ag Service Order Forms 



*Price does not include postage 



Name 



Address 



Billing 



*** 



I wish to apply for a set of FFA Roadside Signs. This would be a 

set. 



new replacement 



School 



AIDS, September 1965 



INDEX TO ITEMS IN VO-AG SERVICE SECTION 

Page 

Agriculture College Guest Day ........ . . . . 3 

Extramural Courses in Agriculture ...................... 1,2 

FFA Roadside Signs. ............................ 2 

In-Service Courses Scheduled ........................ 1 

Meat and Milk Judging Contests ....................... 3 

New Agricultural Vocations Film ...................... 4 

New Books ................................. 4 

New Slidefilms .................... ........ .. 3 

Revised Land-Use Selection Cards ...................... 3 

Revised Order Forms, . ... ...................... . 2 



AEDS, September 1965 



PRICE LIST OF FEEDS- 

The feed prices for many of the feedstuffs used in vocational agriculture projects are 
listed below. This list is meant to be used as a basis of values for all boys obtaining 
their feed at home. Feed purchased should be recorded at prices paid. 

Kind of feed August 10 

2/ 
Corn, shelled, bu.-. .........................$ 1.20 

Corn, ground shelled or ear corn, bu. ................. 1,30 

Oats, bu. . . . .66 

Oats, ground, bu.. .................... „ .... . .76 

Barley, (feed) bu. .......................... 1.05 

Barley, ground or rolled, bu. . . , 1-15 

Grain sorghum, cwt. ......................... 2.00 

Grain Sorghum, cracked, cwt, ..................... 2.10 

Skim and buttermilk, cwt. ....................... 1.50 

Whole milk, Grade B, cwt, .......... ....... ... 3,00 

Corn silage, ton . . . . . ..................... 9,50 

Sorghum silage, ton. ......................... 8.50 

Haylage, ton ..... . ............ ......... 11.00 

Clover and mixed hay) All hay and straw prices ............ 22,00 

Alfalfa ) are for baled. Figure ............ 22.00 

Timothy ) loose at $5 less per ton ............ 20.00 

Oat or wheat straw ) ........................ 17 . 00 



— Prepared in cooperation with the Department of Agricultural Economics. 

2/ 

— New corn quoted at $1.05; high moisture corn to be discounted at the rate of one 

cent for each one-half percent moisture above 15.5 percent. 



Pasture Rates 


Cost per day 


Calves and colts: 




6-11 months 


$.06 


12 - 24 months 


$.09 


over 24 months 


$.12 


Lambs to weaning 


$.01 


Sheep - yearlings 




and mature 


$.025 


Pigs, 50 to 100 lbs. 


$.0025 



*Reduce by 2/3 for full-fed cattle, by 1/3 for limited fed cattle 



AIDS, September 1965 



VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE SERVICE 

Untvaraity of llltnoli - Colli?* o* Agriculture 

434 MUMFORD HALL • URBANA, ILLINOIS 



■ 






1LU 



VO-AG AIDS 



Volume 24, Number 3 
October 1965 



Issued |oinHy by 
Vocational Agriculture Service, College of Agriculture 

and 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

in Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 



VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 



I n-Servic e Courser. Scheduled The following courses have been requested and are tentatively 
scheduled Teachers in the sections involved will be notified directly but in most cases there 
is room for a few additional teachers from nearby sections who may be interested If you are 
from outside the section and wish to attend, please notify Vocational Agriculture Service at 
once We will then notify the host school so that they can plan on you and will send you last 
minute details. 

Starting 
Date Course Place time Section 



October 2 


Surveying 


Eldorado 


9am 


25 


October 6 


Electrical. Controls 


Abingdon 


4 p. m 


4 


October 7 


Electric Motors 


Joliet (Central HS) 


4pm 


8 


October 21 


Electrical Controls 


Watseka 


4pm 


10 


November 1 


New Farm Acct Book 


Freeport 


5 p m 


1 


November 3 


New Farm Acct Book 


(to be announced) 


4 


November 4 


Electrical Controls 


Genoa 


4pm 


6 


November 8 


New Farm Acct Book 


Waverly 


6pm 


15 


November 13 


Surveying 


Forrest 


9 am 


9 


November 13 


Small Engines 


Freeport 


9 am 


1 


November 15 


New Farm Acct Book 


Nokomis 


6 p.m 


19 


November 17 


New Farm Ace'; Book 


Casey 


6pm 


20 


November 19 


Electrical Controls 


Joliet (Central HS) 


4pm 


8 


November 20 


Surveying 


Augusta 


9am 


11 & 13 


December 1 


New Farm Acct Book 


Olney 


(to be announced} 


23 


December 2 


Electrical Controls 


Carthage 


4 p m 


11 


December 6 


New Farm Acct Book 


Dixon 


5pm 


2 


December 15 


New Farm Acct Book 


Mu rphysbo ro 


4.30 p m 


24 



JWM 



Subject -Matter Packets Corn production packets are available again for your 1965-68 
adult class programs This packet is similar to those distributed last year and contains 
some of the latest reference material that might be useful for teaching a class on this 
subject. 



Copies of the Corjj. Production packet are available at $1 75 each, plus postage 
included on the tear sheet for your convenience 



R is 
RLC 

College of Agriculture Stud ent Guest Day Each teacher in Illinois has been sent a poster 
and other information about Student Guest Day for the College of Agriculture, University 
of Illinois, on Saturday October 23, 1965 Registration will begin in the University Audi- 
torium at 9:00 a m Students and adults accompanying them will have an opportunity to 
attend the Illinois-Duke football game in the afternoon at a special price of $1 00 A pro- 
gram for the Guest Day and other information will be sent to you early in October TW1vr 



AIDS, October 1965 



-1- 



New Sli de fi l ms Six new color slidefilms have been sent to all schools that have 1965-66 
advance orders for new slidefilms The new films are: 

181-65 Identification of Kinds of Meat 

182-65 Identification of Pork Cuts 

183-65 Identification of Beef Cuts 

185-65 Identification of Lamb Cuts 

732 Corn Diseases in Illinois 

794 Conl rolling Giant Foxtail 

If you have an advanced order and did not receive these films, please let us know These 
films are now available for general sale and are listed on the tear sheet for those who may 
wish to order rt C 

$300 Collepe Scholarship Through the thoughtfulness of Professor E L. Knake, we can 
agarn announce the weed control essay contest for a $300 college scholarship at the national 
level, and a $25 cash award to each state winner These awards are presented by the 
North Central Weed Control Conference to the boy or girl who submits the winning essay of 
approximately 1 , 000 words entitled "How We Control Weeds on Our Farm ' A. copy of the 
contest rules is enclosed with this issue of the ATDS for Elinois teachers Larry Goodwin 
of E R 2, Geneseo, was the 1964 state winner 

Essays should be sent to Dr. M D McGlamery, Extension Weed Specialist, 215 Davenport 
Hall. University of Illinois, Urbana by October 31, 1965 

RLC 

Winter Wheat in Ill inoi s - 1965 This report was included in the October Agricultural Re- 
leases It includes the latest results from the agronomy research trials as well as yields 
frcm county demonstration plots Quantity copies are available, but the supply is limited 
a^d will not be rerun 

RLC 

Adult Class Assistance -Weeds and Insects Geigy field personnel in Illinois will accept 
dates for adult evening classes of 15 members or more Their presentation deals with 
'Weed and Soil Insect Control in Corn ' If you should desire Geigy's participation in your 
Adult Evening Programs, correspond directly with Mr Robert Lenz who lives at 1101 Frank 
Drive, Champaign, Illinois 61822 

RLC 

Ext ramural Cour se in Ornamen tal Horticult ure For the first semester (1965-66). an 
extramural course in Horticulture E221 — Plant Propagation will be taught by Dr J B 
a' Rock Falls A total enrollment of 15 is necessary in order to continue the course; 
however, preliminary enrollment figures indicate that the 25 member maximum has been 
reached Possible cancellations may permit further registration The course will stari 
on September 30 (Thursday evenings) at 6:30 p m at the Rock Falls High School Agricultu 
Room RLC 

Forest Tr ee A pplic ation Fo rms Through the cooperation of Professor \Y F Bulkley, we 
are enclosing an application for forest tree planting stock and a listing of trees available for 
reforestation purposes These application forms are being sent to vocational agriculture 
teachers in Illinois because the stock is available only to Illinois landowners The nurseries 
will accept orders between September 1, 1965 and April 18, 1966 „, . 

ALUS, Ccfober 1965 -2- 



Agr onom y Day Proceedings — 1965 A single copy was included in the October Releases. 
There is a limited quantity of the booklets remaining If you do not receive Releases and 
wish a copy, plea"^ let us know. rt C 

New Bu ll etins an d Circulars We have received six new bulletins and nine new circulars 
from the University of Illinois College of Agriculture and Experiment Station, as follows: 

Bui 708 Programmed Production Responses on Dairy Farms in 
Northwestern Illinois (25?) 
*Bul 709 A Nutritional Assessment of Methods of Harvesting Summer 
Forage for Dairy Cows (10?' ; 

Productivity of Soils in the North Central Region of the United States (10?) 
Pricing Practices on the Peoria Hog Market (10?) 

The Livestock Feed-Meat Balance in the St. Louis Trade Territory (15?) 
Precipitation and Water -Yield Relationships on the Lake Glendale 
Watershed, Pope County, Illinois (15?) 
Plastic Greenhouses (15?) 

Soil and Water Conservation Districts and Subdistricts An 
Analysis of Their Function Under Illinois Law (5?) 
Diseases of Apples and Pears in the Midwest (20?) 
Preventing Swine Disease Buildup (5£) 
Your Family and Consumer Credit (10?', 
Tomato Diseases and Insect Pests (20?) 
Counting Your Calories (5?, 

The Feasibility of Growing Greenhouse Tomatoes in Southern Illinois (10?) 
1964 Summary of Illinois Farm Business Records (15?} 

A. copy of each of the starred publications was included in October Agricultural Re- 
leases The price shown aftei each is for quantity copies requested by out-of-state readers 
Illinois teachers may secure additional copies o f these publications in the usual way by 
writing to Voeati >na! Agriculture Service .,.», 

Animal Science Course M a* rials The order forms, that were returned after the sectional 
meetings, were accumul; until September 15 We are now reprinting the materials to 
fill those oi'ders Shipments should be made about the latter part of Octobei If you dc not 
receive your order, look in the November AIDS for details 

Meat and Milk Judging Contest Fifty-five teams participated in the meat judging contest 
and 32 m milk The contest was held at Urbana on Saturday, September 18 Shelbyville 
won both contests and will represent Illinois in the respective national contests in October 
Other Qlinois schools that will be participating in national contests this fail are: 

Galesburg - Livestock 
Chenoa - Dairy 
Sterling - Pouli rj 

The 10 high teams and individuals of the meat and milk contests and their scores 
are as follows: 



*Bul 


710 


Bui 


711 


Bui 


712 


Bui 


713 


*Cir 


905 


*Cir 


908 


*Cir 


909 


*Cir. 


910 


*Cir 


911 


*Cir 


912 


Cir 


913 


*Cir 


914 


"Cir 


915 



LUI 


puws: 
Shelbyville 


10 - high teams - 


MILK 




1 


200 


6 Monticello 


245 


2. 


Sterling 


238 


7 Stillman Valley - 


254 


3 


Bismarck 


24C 


8 Geneseo 


262 


4 


Cullom 


241 


9. Dixon 


265 


5 


William sfield 


245 


10 Princeton 


284 



AIDS. October 1965 -3- 



10 - hig h indi viduals _ - MILK 





1„ 


Shelbyville 




- D. McDonald 




- 56 






2, 


Shelbyville 




- D. Gregg 




- 61 






3., 


Cullom 




- G. Kane 




- 62 






4. 


Monticello 




- M. Sievers 




- 65 






5. 


William sfield 


- D. Strange 




- 68 






6, 


Geneseo 




- A. Rohn 




- 69 






7. 


Bismarck 




- E . Lindsey 




- 71 






8, 


Sterling 




- A. Johnson 




- 73 






9 


Dixon 




D. Nunemaker 


- 74 






tie (10 ° 
(10 = 


Milledgeville 


- J. Geerts 




- 75 






Stillman Valley 


- H Goeking 




- 75 




10 


- high teams - 
Shelbyville 


MEAT 
- 1014 


10 


- high individuals 


- MEAT 




1. 


1. 


Shelbyville 


M 


Smith 


359 


2 


Buffalo- , 


- 886 .. 
„~„ tie 

- 886 


(2, 


Shelbyville 


R 


Hudson 


336 


2 


Tonica 


(2. 


Buffalo 


R 


Edwards 


336 


4. 


Orangeville 


- 885 


4. 


Wyoming 


T 


Cox 


322 


5. 


Wenona 


- 883 


5. 


Shelbyville 


W 


Flesner 


319 


6. 


Farmer City 


- 880 


6 


Stonington 


G, 


Garwood 


316 


7, 


Greenview 


- 878 


7 


Virginia 


T. 


Reiterman - 


315 


8.. 


Clinton 


- 877 ,. 

- 873 tie 


(8, 


Orangeville 


H 


Yeagle 


312 


9. 


Rock Falls 


(8. 


Rock Falls 


M 


Betts 


312 


10. 


Stonington 


- 866 


10.. 


Wenona 


D 


Nelson 


311 



The break-down of scores by thirds for this year's contests was a.s follows: 

MEAT 



Blue 

Red 

White 



Blue 

Red 

White 



Teams — 

' 820 - 1014 
755 - 820 
Under 7 55 

MILK 

Teams — 
200 -270 
270 - 352 
Above 352 



Individuals 
272 - 359 
251 - 271 
Under 250 



Indiv iduals 
56 : 89 _ 
90 - 109 



Above 109 



WHW 



American Dairy Assoc „ Mov ie Mr. Milton C Geuther, Manager, American Dairy Assoc- 
iation, sent us a notice of their new 16 mm coioi , 18-minute movie, entitled, "Look Who's 
Talking " If you are interested in showing it to your classes, you may order it as fellows: 

Modern Talking Picture Service 
If you Hve in the northern half of the state-- 160 E Grand Ave 

Chicago, 111 60611 



If you live in the southern half of the state- 



If you live in the eastern tier of counties of 111 -- 



The film is free , except for return postage 
AIDS, October 1965 



Modern Talking Picture Service 
c/o Swank's, Inc. 
621 N. Skinker Blvd 
St Louis, Mo. 63130 

Modern Talking Picture Service 

102 E Vermont St 
Indianapolis, Incl 46204 

WHW 



-4- 



Ogej^or's Mam)als_ Several teachers have requested information on how to obtain 
operator's or owner's manuals for farm tractors or equipment This is repeated from 
an earlier issue of the AIDS, Write directly to the individuals listed below Be sure to 
list the model and year (if possible) of the tractor or implement and allow two weeks for 
delivery 

ALLIS CHALMERS 

Carl Sinister, Advertising Department, Farm Equipment Div. 5 Allis Chalmers Mfg Co , 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

J I CASE 

E. F Reiske, District Manager, J I Case Co „, 4260 Forest Park Ave , St Louis, Mo 

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER 

W. T Schnathcrst, Supv. Educ Services, International Harvester Co, , 180 N Michigan, 
Chicago, Illinois 

Mr, Schnat.horst informs us that they would be willing to supply individual, copies of 
manuals on specific models of machines without charge.. Instructors desiring quantities of 
copies of operator's manuals should contact the International Harvester farm equipment 
district office that serves their area and arrange with them to order the manuals on a. quo- 
tation basis 

JOHN DEERE 

Herman Linde, Deere & Co.., Educational Division, 3300 River Drive, Moline , 111. 

MASSEY -FERGUSON 

George Tamm, Massey -Ferguson Inc , 6143 Brookville, Rd , Indianapolis, Indiana 

NEW HOLLAND 

Elmer Z Delp, Manager of Marketing, New Holland Machine Company. New Holland, Pa, 

NEW IDEA 

Linus Hausfeld, Asst Service Mgr New Idea Farm Equipment Co. , Coldwater, Ohio 

Mr Hausfeld informs us that if Illinois teachers wish to hold farm shop meetings for 
students or farmers on adjusting or repairing equipment they may receive help by contacting 
C R McQuate, Branch Mgr New Idea Farm Equipment. Co , 95 North Main St. , Sandwich, 111. 

OLIVER 

George A Franklin, Branch Manager, Oliver Corporation, 10,000 N Galena Road, 
Peoria, 111 

Mr, Franklin informs us that manuals on older models are out of print in some cases. 
If they have the manuals they will supply them.. 

RFE 

Far m Policy Forum, No< 2 V 1964-65 We have secured copies of this item from Iowa State 
University for the October Agricultural Releases The issue includes articles on rural 
schools, post -high school education, and vocationa.l training We have about 70 copies beyond 
the Agricultural Release needs and will send them on a first-come first-served basis to those 
requesting them 

JHH 

AIDS, October 1965 -5- 



NEW BOOKS 



The following have been added to our library since the last 
issue of the AIDS, All of our books are available for re- 
view in our office by those interested. As long as the 
editions are current, they will be included in such exhibits 
as the one at the Annual Conference of Vocational Agriculture 
Teachers. 



ELEMENTARY TEACHERS GUIDE TO FREE CURRICULUM MATERIALS 1965. $7,50, 
Educators Progress Service, Randolph, Wisconsin. 

The following is taken from the publisher's statement about this publication: 

'This volume replaces all preceding editions. Limiting the extent of the 
GUIDE to about 1,200 titles, and using about 50% of the available accept- 
able listings, together combine to make the materials listed in this 
edition most highly selective. Every title has been rechecked for 
availability, nature a,nd content of listing, distribution conditions, and 
educational value. This edition lists 1,275 items, of which 568, or 
44.5% are new. 

"This GUIDE is a complete, up-to-date, annotated schedule of selected 
FREE maps, bulletins* pamphlets, exhibits, charts, and books," 



LATE NOTE 

Templates fo r Rap id Raters, We have just received a supply of replacement templates for 
the Rapid Rater, These are the black slide inserts with the number codes on them. Some 
tea.ch.ers have indicated a need to replace templates that have been damaged. We have both 
the templates coded 1-4 and those coded 5-8 They are available at 25y each or 50£ for the 
pair. They are listed on the tear sheet for convenience in ordering, twm 



AIDS, October 1965 



-6- 



1 .1 

1 1 

1 1 


™U89l 



^c^ 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION / COLLEGE OF EDUCATION /UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Placement Report , As of September 10, 1965, there were four high school vocational agri- 
culture vacancies and two junior college vocational agriculture vacancies in Illinois. There 

are no candidates available at the present time. . mT1 

* NDE 

Annual Placement R eport The demand fox teachers of agriculture during the past twelve 
months was slightly stronger than it was for the similar period last year As of September 1, 
1965, eight vocational agriculture positions were open in Illinois schools. The placement 
data for the 1963-64 placement season show that the critical shortage of teachers in 1963-64 
was partially alleviated by drawing teachers from other states This year few schools were 
able to secure teachers from other states because the teacher shortage was national in scope. 

The demand for teachers of agriculture in the future will undoubtedly grow as new programs 
are started in Illinois high schools and junior colleges. The supply of young men preparing 
for educational work and the number of graduates entering the teaching profession must be 
increased. 

The data below summarize the demand-supply situation for 1963-64 and 1964-65 placement 
seasons: 



Total number of Placements 

Number of inexperienced and out-of-state teachers placed 

Number of experienced teachers placed 

Number of out-of-state teachers placed 

Number of teachers moving into teaching from other work 

Number of returning servicemen placed 

Number of teachers placed who were teaching in Illinois 
during the previous year 

Number of teachers placed who were not teaching in Illinois 
during the previous year 

Schools without approved teachers of vocational agriculture 
on September 1 



1964- 

88 


65 


1963-64 
91 


49 




49 


43 




46 


7 




13 


15 




9 


1 




1 


28 




34 


60 




57 



PEH 



AIDS, October 1965 



Agricultural Edu cation Pla cemen t Re pres entative Norman Ehresman, Instructor 1 in 
Agricultural Education, will handle placement services in agricultural education for the 
Division of Agricultural Education, University of Illinois, for 1956-66, 

Teachers who want to register for placement services and administrators who are seeking 
vocational agricultural teachers should contact Norm His office address is 351 Education 
Building and Ms telephone number is 333-3036 , T 

Graduate As sistants f or 19 65-66 The following persons have been employed as graduate 
assistants in the Agricultural Education Division for 1965-66: 

Name H ome State 

1. Ulin Andrews Illinois 

2. Robert Cottingham Illinois 

3. A E Eichelberger Mississippi 

4 Carl Hart Illinois 

5 Vincente Quiton Phillipines 
6, Darwin Swanson Illinois 

7 Daniel Vogler Illinois 

LJP 

New St aff M embers Norman Ehresman and Martin McMillion have accepted appointments 
as instructors in the Agricultural Education Division. They have been employed as graduate 
assistants in agricultural education during the past two years Norm is a former teachers of 
vocational agriculture in Indiana Martin is a former teacher of vocational agriculture in 
West Virginia and Pennsylvania T . 

Illinois Agricultural Education Curric ulum P roject Cissna Park, Olney, St Elmo, and 
Woodstock will again conduct pilo*: programs in vocational agriculture The Division of Agri- 
cultural Education, University of Illinois will conduct a research project designed to describe, 
analyze, and evaluate procedures and techniques tried out during the year in these four schools 
Monthly visits will be made by Division staff members to these schools to observe classes and 
to collect data At the close of the year a report describing what has been learned will be 
prepared and made available to all Illinois teachers 

The pilot programs at the four high schools will consist of vocational training for students pre- 
paring for non-farm agricultural occupations Teachers will try out different cui ricular designs, 
new modules of vocational content . and various procedures for organizing and conducting 
placement -employment programs PFT1 

USOE Bureau of R esearch Adviso ry Comm ittee, Lloyd J, Phipps is serving as a member of 
the Advisory Committee on Adult, Vocational and Technical Education Research, Bureau of 
Research, United States Office of Education He was in Washington D C on September 23 for 
a meeting of the committee T TTD 

Keith Fiscus Goes to Sierr a L eon e Keith Fiscus received the Doctor of Education Degree in 
agricy^uxaJ education at the University of Illinois in June, 1965 In July he started to work as 
an agricultural education specialist in Sierra Leone, Africa, representing agricultural educi tio: 
University of Illinois. Keith was a teacher of agriculture in Kansas before coming to the University 
of Illinois as a graduate assistant in agricultural education T Tp 

AIDS. October 1965 -2- 



Research Proj ect - Wor ld o f Work Instructional Programs Professors A H Krebs and 
J R Warmbrod are directing a research and development project which has been funded by 
the Research and Statistical Service. State Board of Vocational Education and Rehabilitation 
The main purpose of the project - titled 'Development of World of Work Instructional Pro- 
grams" - is to provide a basis for planning the content of occupational information courses 
The specific objectives of the project are: 

1 To identify the specific items of knowledge possessed by youth, at 
or near the time of making occupational choices, about the occupa- 
tions chosen, 

2. To determine the relationship between changing knowledge about 
occupations and changes in occupational choice 

3, To determine whether different kinds of occupation instruction 
programs should be designed for various student groups identified 

4 To develop basic guidelines for planning programs of instruction 

about the world of work 
5. To plan and try out in a pilot center an instructional program about 

the world of work based on the guidelines developed. 

The Decatur, Oakland, and Urbana schools will be cooperating in conducting the study 
Graduate assistant Ulin Andrews will be working on the project 

JRW 

Votec 2 75 The 1965-66 student teachers have completed their summer experience programs. 
A list of the students and their cooperating teachers follows: 



School 

Belvidere 
Cerro Gordo 
Herscher 
Henry 

Joliet 
Lincoln 

Lawrenceville 

Mahomet 

Mattoon 
Minonk 

Rochelle 

St Joseph 

Sullivan 

Sycamore 
Woodstock 



Cooperating T each er 
Loren Mills 
Don Prather 
Eklon Chapman 
Virgil M Foster 

Max Kuster 
Robert Dorch 

Jesse Keyser 

Kenneth Knell 

James Leming 
Wm Martinie 

Glenn Curl 

Kermit Esarey 

Billy Rich 

Robert Howey 
George Forgey 



Student Teache r 
Gerald Maybe rry 
Mike Still 
James Shaffer 
John Huston 
Charles Rayburn 
Tom Marron 
Donald Jarrett 
Art Neavill 
Frank Barbre 
John Hillison 
Allen Berry 
James Marshall 
Maurice Tompkins 
Phillip Landes 
Arnold Pare he rt 
David Berg 
Gene Bork 

Robert De Wolfe 
Alaji Naylor 
Allen Ho mb rook- 
Bruce Fryman 
Gerald Theobald 
Roger Allaman 
Dale Howe 

AHK 



AIDS, October 1965 



-3- 



R ESEARCH PROJECT REGARDING EDUCATION FOR AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION 
CREDIT . A research project, Education Regarding Credit for Agricultural Production, is 
being conducted by the Agricultural Education Division, University of Illinois, in coopera- 
tion with the Illinois Production Credit Associations and The Federal Intermediate Credit 
Bank of St. Louis. The focus of this project is on the problems faced by users of credit for 
agricultural production,. The specific objectives of this research -developmental project are 
as follows: 

1= Identify the present focus and thrust of high school and adult education 

programs regarding credit for agricultural production. 
2. Determine the effectiveness of the existing educational programs.. 
3 Identify areas in which additional thrust needs to be developed in 

existing programs 
4. Identify new educational programs which might be needed 
5 Develop the educational materials and methods required to help 

generate the needed new thrust* 
6. Try out the educational methods and materials developed and 

evaluate the results. 

A total of 120 teachers of agriculture have been contacted by means of a mailed survey form. 
100 percent cooperation is needed if this project is to be a success. 

GRF 



E370 - FIRST YEAR TEACHER'S COURSE, This extramural graduate credit course is being 
offered for the sixteenth year. Beginning agriculture teachers, those returning to teaching 
and those teaching in Illinois for the first time are eligible to enrolL Preliminary registra- 
tion has been completed but any teacher who wishes to enroll and ha.s not yet done so may 
register for the course by contacting Dr, Gerald R Fuller, 361 Education Building, University 
of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61803 . The following teachers are presently enrolled: 



1„ 

2, 
3 = 
4, 
5, 
6. 
7. 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12, 
13. 
14 
15 . 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20, 
21 
22 

AIDS, October 1965 



Name 
Joseph Berberich 
John Blessent 
Steve Bruce 
Daniel W. Bock 
Bernard M.. Clark 
Larry Clark 
Jerry Crump 
Robert Daniel 
Darrell Dillow 
Edward Greer 
V. Byron Gregg 
Duane Gullett 
J, D Harrold 
Harley W. Hicks, Jr 
Charles Higgins 
Larry Hippen 
Howard Kendrick 
Forest Kermicle 
V. Lynn Laible 
W Bradford Lacey 
Daniel Leathers 
Henry A, McClenning 



School 
Teutopolis 
Farmington 
Stanford 
Princeton 

North Boone (Poplar Grove) 
Herrick 

Lincolnwood (Raymond) 
Waterman 
Dongola 
Rankin 
Assumption 
Yates City 
Newman 
Newton 
Mt, Carmel 
Havana 
Tolono 
Dieterich 
Wenona 
Neoga 
Girard 
Beecher 

(cont, ) 



-4- 



(cont, ) 



Name 



23, 


Hubert Melton 


24, 


Max Muirheid 


25 


Jack Niles 


26. 


John Peden 


27, 


Ned Allen Richardson 


28. 


Bill Schreck 


29, 


Ronald Skinner 


30. 


John E. Smith 


31. 


William Speers 


32.. 


G. Dale Stallings 


33. 


Larry Stevenson 


34„ 


Ed Stokes 


35, 


Don Toepke 


36. 


James Trotter 


37 


Lloyd Taylor 


38., 


Darwin O. Waggoner 


39. 


Robert Walters 


40. 


Vernon Watt 


41. 


Eugene H Wagner 


42, 


Kenneth Webb 


43 


Roy Wetzel 


44. 


James Winslow 


45 


Donald Wilson 


46, 


Floyd Wohrley 



School 
Taylor Ridge 
Illiopolis 
Shabbona 
Reddick 
Cuba 

Warren (Monmouth) 
Jerseyville 
Bismarck 
Kansas 
Okawville 
Milford 
Winnebago 
Griggsville 
Warsaw 
Cornell 
Hardin 
Ridge Farm 
Mid -County (Varna) 
Lincolnway (New Lenox) 
Augusta 

Jamaica (Sidell) 
Minooka 
Western (Buda) 
Cambridge 



GRF 



AIDS, October 1965 




Mvat 



NEWS 



ILLINOIS ASSN. OF VO-AG TEACHERS 



We would like to have news for the November newsletter from Sectional Public 
Relations Officers from Sections (16, 17, 18, 19 and 20) and would welcome news from 
any or all sectional reporters News should reach M. J. Nicol, Maroa, by October 12 
for the November issue 

At their last meeting the IAVAT Executive Committee voted a budget (expenditures) 
for 1965-66 as follows: 



Conventions and conferences 


$1250 00 


Awards and banquet 


200 00 


Judging contest 


300.00 


Postage, etc 


300.00 


Flowers, Memos, etc.. 


50 00 


Committee reports 


300 00 


Secretary salary 


200. 00 


Miscellaneous 


7 5 00 


TOTAL $2675 00 


*P T^ ^ f - * * 





Joe W Berger informs me that sections having 100% paid up membership are 
sections 7, 10, 11, 13, 14, and 24 Congratulations to these sections 

Let's have the rest of the sections join the 100% club by the next report 

The Illinois Foundation, Future Farmers of America Board of Trustees is com- 
posed of Hie following membership: President, Ralph A . Guthrie, Advisor, Illinois FFA, 
and Chief of Agricultural Education, Board of Vocational Education and Rehabilitation, 
Springfield; Vice-Presidents Melvin J Nicol, Maro^, President IAVAT; Secretary, 
G Donavon Coil, Springfield, Executive Secretary, Illinois FFA; E L Rice, Princeville, 
Past President, IAVAT; John Austin, Chicago, Vice -Chairman, State Sponsoring Com- 
mittee. Seai-s -Roebuck Foundation; William Fortschneider, Jacksonville, Chapter Advisor; 
James Guilinger, Williamsfield, Chapter Advisor; C. J Kuster, Normal, Chapter Advisor: 
Jerry Kuykendall , Findlay, Chapter Advisor; Lynn Laible, Wenona, Chapter Advisor; 
Delmar Launius, St Jacob, Chapter Advisor; John Matthews, Urbana, Professor and 
head of Vocational Agriculture Service. College of Agriculture, University of Illinois; 
L J Phipps, Urbana, Professor and Chairman of Agricultural Education, University of 

AIDS, October 1965 



Illinois; Doi'land Smith, Petersburg, Chairman, State Sponsoring Committee, Menard 
Electric Co-Op , Petersburg; John Sweeney, William sville, Chapter Advisor 

The board of trustees donate time and effort in the interest of FFA If you have 
any suggestions for the good of the foundation, please pass them on to one of the members, 

Did you know that 

Harold Engelking serves as Treasurer of the Illinois Foundation FFA and as 
Secretary of the State Sponsoring Committee 

The Illinois Foundation, Future Farmers of America Board of Trustees approved 
a budget for the 1965-66 year totaling $21, 761 60 

George Irvine likes to go to beauty contests He had a front seat at one in Springfield 
recently. He was attending the pageant, along with John Bangert, state FFA winner in Farm 
Electrification, Tonica, as guest of the Association Illinois Electric Cooperatives 

It has been suggested that any member interested in changes in the IAVAT should 
get in touch with chairmen of the various committees and give them your suggestions A 
list of the committees may be found in the August AIDS 

Sherwood Jackson, Chairman of the State Fair Committee states his committee will 
meet soon and would welcome any suggestions. 

* ;+ *. -^ ^ jjc 

We are informed by George Irvine that probably the oldest FFA hog sale in the 
state is the one conducted by the Seneca Chapter Many other sales are held each year in 
the sale barn built by the Seneca Chapter Sherwood Jackson is chapter advisor 

Serena and Newark FFA Chapters have held a joint hog sale for many years 

Our congratulations go to the IVA legislative committee for the fine position report 
of the Illinois Association of Vocational Agriculture Teachers for the Governor's Task Force 
on Education Members of the committee are Eldon Witt, Chairman; Burdette Graham; 
Jesse Keyser; William Martinie and Professor A H Krebs. 

A copy of the report came with your September AIDS Take time to ready and study 

SECTION 15 NEWS; 

Section 15 welcomes four new teachers to the section Ronald Skinner will be one 
of the instructors in the two-man Vo-Ag Dept at Jerseyvitle High School Ronald gx'aduated 
from Illinois State University in June 1965. He is married and has a 10-month-old daughter 
This is his first year in the teaching field He did his student teaching at Maroa 

Dan Leathers, also a graduate of Illinois State University, will fill the Vo-Ag 
position at Girard High School This is Dan's first year in the teaching field He did his 
student teaching at Wapella under Mr Shettler Dan is married and they have a daughter 
13 months old 

AIDS, October 1965 -2- 



Arley Lee Van Doren will fill the Vo-Ag position at Southwestern High School, 
Piasa Arley graduated from S.LU. , and he has had three years teaching experience at 
Yates City. He and his wife have one son, Russell Allen. 

Darwin O Waggoner, a graduate of S I.U , will begin his teaching career this 
year at Calhoun Community High School, Hardin. Darwin has completed some graduate 
work at S.I.U. 

Bill Fortschneider, Vo-Ag teacher from Jacksonville says that a new building has 
been started at Jacksonville High School Vocational Agriculture, Woodshop, Electronics, 
Machine Shop, Power Mechanics, Drafting, and Home Economics will be housed in the new 
facility. It is anticipated that the new building will be ready for the 1966-67 school year, 
and it will be located just north of the Jacksonville Senior High School. Bill has been teach- 
ing at Jacksonville since 1960 

Leland E Ashby, Jr 
Section 15 Reporter 

SECTION 22 NEWS: 

Section 22 held its livestock judging contest April 23 at Turkey Hill Grange near 
Belleville. Since the contest is different from those held in other sections, teachers may 
be interested in knowing about it. 

Instead of the conventional fat stock and dairy teams, the contest has individual teams 
for dairy, beef, swine, and sheep This gives a student a chance to specialize in a given 
area and permits more contestants to judge in the event. 

The contest is set up to be educational as well as competitive Competent judges 
are brought in to explain placings to the students and to give demonstrations. Hunter 
Packing Company explained placings to the swine team 

Demonstrations are given in wool grading and meat judging The contestants, 
besides placing rings, have to grade sediment disks, etc. 

Section 22 feels it has a very competitive but yet highly educational livestock judging 
contest.. 

T 1 * n* *P *l* *l* 1* 

Leroy Lawrence, district 2 director, reports that a recent tornado took the roof 
and ceiling from the main body of his home in Lockport His damage from the wind, water, 
etc , is estimated at $18,000. There were no injuries to his family He reports that 
four farms in Ms area were entirely destroyed, with severe injuries to the residents . He 
states there are few trees left in Lockport 

SECTION 13 NEWS: 

The vocational agriculture teachers of Section 13 met on July 26 at the Farm Bureau 
Building, Quincy, Illinois, for the animal science workshop 

Section 13 FFA Fair was held at the Adams County Fair Grounds, Mendon, Illinois, 
on August 11 FFA members had hogs, sheep, beef, dairy, poultry, and garden entries 

Raymond E. Dunn 
Section 13 
****** Public Relations Officer 

AIDS, October 1965 -3- 



(tear sheet) 



TO: Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61803 



Please send the following items: 

Number Price * Amount Item 

SLIDEFILMS — 

______ $1 90 181-65 Identification of Kinds of Meat (color) 

2. 53 182-65 Identification of Pork Cuts (color) 

2.63 183-65 Identification of Beef Cuts (color) 

2, 09 185-65 Identification of Lamb Cuts (color) 

2 . 57 732 Corn diseases in Illinois (color) 

2,27 794 Controlling Giant Foxtail (color) 



1. 75 Corn Production Packet 

n o chg "Winter Wheat in Illinois - 1965" 

25 T emplate for Rapid Rater, Coded 1-4 

,25 Template for Rapid Rater, Coded 5-8 



*Prices do not include postage. 



*** 



Name School 



Address 



Billing 



ADDS, October 1965 



INDEX TO ITEMS IN VO-AG SERVICE SECTION 

Page 

Adult Class Assistance - Weeds and Insects 2 

Agronomy Day Proceedings — 1965 3 

American Dairy Assoc Movie 4 

Animal Science Course Materials . . . . .3 

College of Agriculture Guest Day ... . , , , 1 

Extramural Course in Ornamental Horticulture , 2 

Farm Policy Forum, No 2, 1964-65 5 

Forest Tree Application Forms , .. . . . - 2 

In-Service Courses Scheduled „ , 1 

Meat and Milk Judging Contest ,. ,. . 3 & 4 

New Books .6 

New Bulletins and Circulars , „ 3 

New Slidefftms 2 

Operator's Manuals 5 

Subject Matter Packets , 1 

$300 College Scholarship . . . 2 

Winter Wheat in Illinois - 1965 2 

Templates for Rapid Raters 6 



AIDS, October 1965 



PRICE LIST OF FEEDS- 

The feed prices for many of the feedstuff s used in voca.tin.nal agriculture projects are 
listed below This list is meant to be used as a basis of values for all boys obtaining 
their feed at home Feed purchased should be recorded at prices paid 

Kind of feed 

2/ 
Corn, shelled, bu - • 

Corn, ground shelled or ear corn, bu 

Oats, bu. 

Oats, ground, bu 

Barley, (feed) bu. 

Barley, ground or rolled, bu 

Grain sorghum, cwt 

Grain sorghum, cracked, cwt . . 

Skim and buttermilk, cwt - 

Whole milk, Grade B, cwt 

Corn silage, ton 

Sorghum silage, ton 

Haylage, ton 

Clover and mixed hay) .... , 

,,, ,, • All hay and straw prices 

Alfalfa ) r i i j t-.- 

T . , . are for baled Figure 

„ , ' y , , : loose at $5 less per ton 

Oat or whea' straw ) ^ 



September 15 


$ 1 


18 


1 


28. 




62 




72 


1 


00 


1 


10 


2 


00 


2 


10 


1 


50 


3 


00 


9 


50 


8 
14 


50 3/ 

oo- 7 


22 


00 


23 


00 


20 


00 


17 


00 



— Prepared in cooperation with the Department of Agricultural Economics 
2/ 

— New corn quoted at $1 02; high moisture corn to be discounted at the rate of one 

cent for each one-half percent moisture above 15 5 percent 

3/ 

— Or convert to dry hay equivalent containing 90 percent dry matter 

Pasture Rates 

"Calves and colts: 

6-11 months 
12 - 24 months 
over 24 months 



Cost_per day 


$ 


06 


$ 


09 


$ 


12 


$ 


01 


$ 


025 


$ 


0025 



Lambs to weaning 
Sheep - yearlings 

and mature 
Pigs, 50 to 100 lbs 

Wedaiceby~2/3 forTuTL^fed cattle, by 1/3 for limited fed cattle 



AIDS, October 1965 



VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE SERVICE 

Unlvaralty of llHnolt ■ CaO»g» of Agriculture 

434 MUMFORD HAIL • URBANA, ILLINOIS 



UillV Of ILL LIBRARY 






VO-AG AIDS 



Volume 24, Number 4 
November 1965 



Issued Jointly by 
Vocational Agriculture Service, College of Agriculture 

and 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

in Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 



VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 



In-Service Course? Scheduled The following courses have been requested and are tenta 
tively scheduled Teachers in the sections involved will be notified cbrectly but in most 
cases there is room for a few additional teachers from nearbj sections who may be inter- 
ested 1" you are from outside the section and wish to attend please notify Vocational 
Agriculture Service a' once We will then notify the host school so that they can plan on 
you and will send you last minute details 













Start ing 




Date 


Cotu s< 




Place 




time 


Sec tion 


November 1 


New Farm Acct 


Book 


Freeport 




5 p m 


1 


November 3 


New Faim Acct 


Book 


Monmouth (Warren HS) 


6 3C p m 


4 


November 4 


Electrical Contr 


ols 


Genoa 




4 p m 


6 


November 8 


New Farm Acct 




Waverly 




6pm 


15 


Novemb r 13 


Surveying 




Forrest 




9am 


9 


November 15 


New Farm Acct 


Book 


Nokomis 




6 p m 


19 


November 17 


New Farm Acct 


Book 


Case} 




6pm 


20 


November 19 


E ] ec • j ic a] Controls 


Joliet (Centra] 


HS) 


4pm 


8 


November 20 


Surveying 




Augusta 




9 a m 


11 & 13 


Novembe 23 


New Fsi'm Acct 


Book 


WilliamsviJle 


4:30 p m 


14 


December 1 


New Farm A( •. 


Be ok 


Olney 


(to 


he announce i; 


23 


December 2 


Electrics! Con'" 


els 


Carthage 




4 p m 


11 


♦December 4 


Small Eng'-nes 




Freeport 




9 a m 


1 


December 6 


New Farm Acct 


Book 


Dixon 




5pm 


2 


December 8 


New Form Acer 


Book 


Perry (Wagon Wheel 
Restaurant) 


4 30 p m 


13 


December 13 


New Farm Acct 


Book 


Salem 




6pm 


21 


Decemb-i 15 


New Farm Aoc! 


Book 


Murphy sbo] o 


4:30 p m 


24 



♦Date changed from that originally announced 



JWM 



Illi nois Fai i ; <rd P j Problems a n ' Keys The new books should be in by November 1 
and we will till order? a see,, as possible aftei th< \ arrive The ssme problem (1964) is 
availab! Coi use with the book A new key has been prepared; this shows how the problem 
is entered in the ne^v book The new key will also be avail aJ ' by November 1 

We are holding a number of orders foi these materials If you hove not yet ordered, you 

j-i — i. . ~t___.i. r j-i.*_ 



m< ., wanl t f - use the tear sheet, for this purpose 



JHh 



ATOG. November 1965 



FFA Roads He Signs It was announced in the September AIDS that: sufficienl funds were made 
available by the Illinois Foundation FFA to provide aboui 50 sets of FFA Roadside Signs during 
the 1935 -65 school year Chapters who were on the waving list since last .year and who had sent 
in complete information were to be given first priority, Next came chapters who had applie : 
but had not. returned their selection of signs, etc , v/ho were given until October 1 to dc so It 
was then thrown open to new applications Signs arc being prepared for the following schools 
ace vdmgly 

Metamor; 

Metropolis 

Murphysboro 

Nauvoo 

New Lenox 

New^n 

Odin 

Olney 

Pa 1 myi :a 

Pias'- 

Pinckneyville 

Piincevjlie 



Aledc 
Annsw ..i 
A' snood 
Beason 
Benton 

Campbell Hill 
C-r'oondale 
Cerro Gordo 
Cull cm 



Dwight 

Edw-idsville 

Erie 



Fairview 

Fisher 

F reepo r ; 

Gibson City 

Havana 

Lawrenceville 

Lit+le York 

Macon 

Malta 

Manteno 

Mazon 

McLeansboro 

Mendon 



R a • il- i n 

Robinsoi- 

St Elm. 

Sidel) (Janiiu 

Somonauk 

Sparland 

Thompsonville 

Toulon 

Trent o i 

Wap. 

Wen on" 

Will iamsf '.eld 



ca) 



These schools will be notified when their signs are readj 
wil 1 be placed on the list for nexi. yea.r 



Other schools who have applii d 



JWM 



1965 N ational Electrical Cod< The National Electrical Code i'-: revised every three ye..'; 
The L965 edition was issued in September Up until this year the Code war-: heavily subsidized 
by the National Board of Fire Undei \ ril srs ■ id we were able to furnish it at I5£ per copy i: 
is now available only from the National Fire Pro' • tfjon Associatio 60 B< tterymarch Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02110, at $1 00 p°r copy in quantii i :s i p to 5 copies By ordering in 
larger quantities, we can make it available to you at $ 85 per "opy, plus postage I yo\ wish 
to purchase Codes through Vocational Agriculture Service, please use the tear sheet in this 
issue of the AIDS We have 250 copies on ordei and ca > deliver as soon as this supply an i 
Yoa might get quicker delivery if you order directly from the address given above . but if you 
do. payment must accompany your order twm 

Safe ty Glasses On October 1, 5965, Superintended . Ray Page a tvised all si hool adminisl 
tors o r the passage of Senate Bill 1190 --Protective Eye Covering To help vocational agricul- 
ture teachers comply with this law, we plan to stock safety glasses with side shields foi about 
$3 £5 per pair These glasses are manufactured by a leading optical company and meet the 
minimum standards prescribed by the r merican Standards Association, Inc For visiters or 
students who normally weai prescription glasses, we will also have available flexible plast.it 
ma?k goggles at about $1 40 per pair 

Please indicate on the tear sheet how many pairs of glasses and goggles you wish to order 
We will place our order about November 15, 1965 and deliver as soon a-: we can get them 

R FE 



AIDS, November 1965 



Electrical Wir ing Boxes We currently have 35 boxes of electrical wiring supplies th: 
have been picked up or delivered to schools There are 40 more schools that have sent 
in loan agreements and for which we have scheduled boxes This takes care of our supply 
of 75 boxes However, 20 boxes are due back by December 1, which means we should have 
this many readj to go out again by Januarj I We should like to ask your cooperation on 
the following points 

1 Please staii using the box as soon as you gel it so tha.1 you can h v < a 
back L>\ the time you specified on your loan agreement. LI a! ■ possibl< 

2 it' you have no1 scheduled a box and wish to do so your loan agreement 
should be sent in as far ahead as possible Write for a Loan agn < menl 
t( mi it you do not have one 

3 Please do no1 request a tx>\ for more than two months except m unusual 
circumstances 

[f you follow these suggestions, we will do our best not tc disappoint you 

JWM 

Animal Science Course Materials The orders for animal science course materials that 
have been accumulated this fall are being lilted now It you have sent in an order and 
have nol received it by November 15, please let us know 

Additional copies ol the materials are being prepar* d so future orders can be tilled im- 
mediately, as long %s the supplies last,, A tea,r sheet is included for your convenience 
Please note the List of items included m each packet on the back ol the teai she< 

The course materials are being soki only in packets this year Please do nol order 
indrv idual Ltems 

WHW 

Club Cali Sale The following information was furnished by Sherwood Jackson, vocational 
agriculture instructor at Seneca, Illinois: 

"A nice consignment of 60 calves t rom 30 herds will be offered at Seneca's 8th 
Annual Club Calf Saie The 1965 sale will be held in the FFA Salebam in Seneca on 
Thursday night, November 18th, a1 ". .00 p m Fifty steers and fifteen registered 1965 
heifers will be sold — Shorthorns , Angus and Herefords 

"Excellent offerings of show calves in past sales has resulted from the use oi im - 
proved sires in the consigning herds The entire offering is eligible to show in ' Land O 
Lincoln Classes' at the 1966 Flinois State Fair The entire consignment was c lived in 
1965, weighing between 350 and 500 pounds, and broke to tie. by sale night 

"The Seneca Club Calf Sale is cooperatively sponsored hv the Seneca FFA and 
Illinois Cattle Breeders to provide quality Angus, Shorthorn, and Hereford < alves from 
purebred herds for youth to fit and show at 1966 fairs. Sale committee is Tim Temple of 
Serena: Wesley Ratcliff of Seneca; and Roy Kates ol Grand Ridge 

"All calves will be in place for buyer inspection in the Seneca FFA Salebam, in 
Seneca Illinois, after 5-00 p m CST, on Thursday night November 18th, 1965 The 
calf auction will begin promptly at 7:00 p m " 

WHW 



AIDS, November 1965 



Electric Motors from Emerso n Ele ctric Co Each vo-ag department in Illinois ha.3 received, 
or will receive, 7 electric motors that were furnished to the State Board at no charge by the 
Emerson Electric Company, This was explained in a recent lettei \ou received from 
Mr Ralph Guthrie, Chiei of Agricultural Education, Springfield Mr Guthrie supplied us 
with the name of the individual to whom you may wish to writ< to express appreciation !' 
Mi Pete Evans Emerson Electri< Company, 8100 W Florissant Avenue. St Louis 36, 
Missouri JWM 

Bulletins Two new bulletins Er< m the ( ollege of Agriculture have been received since 
the la st A CDS They are. 

Bulletin 713 Precipitation and W ter-Yi< Ld Relationships on the 

Lake Glendale Watershed 
BulL tin 714 Pricing Butcher Hogs al Illinois Country Markets 

Becausi oi their technical nature, neither of these publications were included in the November 
shipment of Agricultural Releases ii you wish a copy for reference Let us know 

JWM 

Honor Students T al • g The following was sen: to us by Dean Karl E Gardner of the 

College of Agriculture I think it will be oi interesl to you 

'in tabulating the records for the seventeen fop juniors and seniors in the College of 
Agriculture at the University of Illinois (using 1 75 gradi a era] . juniors and 4 50 for 
seniors where A. = 5 0) several int> resting facts were noted Oi 'lie thirteen men in Agri- 
culture (the other fonr were in Home Economics) eight took four years of Vocational .• 
ture in high school , one look two yeai s, and one took one yeai Several of these young men 
took five units of English in high school and the others took four Eight of the thirteen t< 
four years oi mathematics and only one took two years, the minimum required for admission 
Ail but one had a course in high school physics and all but two had a course in chemistrj 

"Another interesting fact about the entire seventeen men and women is that three of 
the seventeen came from Stillman Valley High School two from Minooka High School. and 
two from Valmeyer High School By the way, onlj one of the thirteen men came from 
having over 7 graduates 

When principals and others ask me whether or not a studeul should take Vocation 
Agriculture if he plans to come to college, you could hardly expect me to discourage the 
student who is interested in Vocational Agriculture on the basis of the abov< tcord. could 
you? Isn't the best answer to this question, 'Mi- Principal, you determine how good youi 
vocational agriculture teacher is as an instructor and counselor and how good his Vo 
program is '" 

KEG/JWM 

JobOgportunitiesJor AgColLegeGraduates Included in copies of the AIDS going to Illinois 
teachers is a listing of career opportunities for college graduates in agriculture This was 
tabulated and furnished by Asst Dean Warren Wessels and represents jobs listed with 
College of Agriculture placement offic ■ between lanuary 1 and June 30, 1965 Dean Wessels 
makes the following statement: 

'1 hope the attached information will be of help to yon as you counsel your students 
about career oppoitunities in agriculture 

"If you need additional copies of these materials, please let me knew, , would appr< 
ciate receiving any suggestions you may have regarding the types of can i mi -ri^ls which 
would be of mos' help to you " WKW/JWM 

AIDS, November 1965 -4- 



Off -Farm Ag Occupations Materials We are indebted to Mr Ralph Guthrie for the latest in- 
fo rmation about the new curriculum materials available from the Ohio Center for Research 
and Leadership Development in Vocational and Technical Education. The following is quoted 
from a letter to Mr, Guthrie from the director of the Center: 

"Enclosed is a revised order blank for the off-farm agricultural occupations material 
available from The Center for Vocational and Technical Education This reflects the estab- 
lished non-profit price of these materials and is based on printing, handling , and mailing 
costs . We were not able to establish firm prices until a majority of this work was completed, 

"We now have most of these materials on hand or at 'he printers We plan mailings 
on these materials October 18 We will begin with the sixteen modules and course outline in 
Agricultural Machinery - Service Occupations By October 25, we should be able bo star! 
mailing Agricultural Supply - Sales and Service and one or ; .^<> miscellaneous publications = 
The series on Horticulture - Service Occupations and mos . I the other miscellaneous puh- 
lications should be ready to mail in November 1 " 

We have reprinted this order f orm for you and included it :u (he back pari o1 this issue of 
the AIDS. Please note that orders are to be sent diri c Ly_ to the ! r at Columbus : Ohio 
(complete address on order form), and not to Vocational Agriculture Service 

JWM 



5 



National Dirj , -or\_of_Sjyet.v_ i ! 1 J m ? (),ir attention has been calli d to a comprehensive catalog 
listing over- a thousand motion pi< tures filmstrips and slides dealing with safety and related 
topics such as fire prevention, health '.raining, first aid and rescue This catalog includes 
sections on occupational safetj office safety, farm safety, school safety traffic safety and 
home hazards Each listing gives a description o1 the film (type, length year produced), 
summarizes the content, tells where each film can he obtained, and whether it can be •■< nted 
or must be purchased 64 pages, bi x 11 inches 



This directory. Stock No 029 10-5 is available Erom the National Safetj Council 

425 N Michigan Ave:. Chicago, Illinois 60611 The price for single copies is $2 -^0 and 

n 

REE 



schools receive a 20% discounl 



Additional Career 7 n!o rnv.bcn Two additional items relating to Agriculturj ( areers were 
furnished by the office of Dean K E Gardner and are included with copies of the AIDS going 
to Illinois teachers. They are "income and Occupations of I960 Graduates of the University 
of Illinois College of Agriculture Five Years After Graduation" and "Agriculture and Related 
Fields " 

JWM 



AIDS November 1965 -5- 



NEW BOOKS 



The following have been added to our library since the last 
issue of the AIDS . All of our books are available for review 
in our office by those interested., As long as the editions are 
currents they will be included in such exhibits as the one at 
the Annual Conference of Vocational Agriculture Teachers , 



ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF FARM AN IMALS R. D. Frandson. 1965. $12.50. 
Lea and Febiger s Philadelphia, 

Notes from the publisher include the following: 

'This is a clearly written text for undergraduate students majoring <n animi ! 
husbandry, dairy production or agriculture, The fundamentals of anatc my 
and physiology as they apply to all animals are c< asidered firsl t< Llow< d bj 
species differences in the cow, horse, sheep, hog and dog This is believed 
to be the only presently available work that surveys, in such d< tailed ' tshlon, 
both the anatomy and physiology of farm animals," 

EDUCATORS GUIDE TO FR EE SCIENCE MATERIALS 1965. $7.25, Educators Progress 
Service, Randolph. Wisconsin. 

The publisher states; 

'Educators Guide to Free Science Materials a cyclopedi< . pi (.'ess onal servi( e, 
brings you complete, up-to-date, organized and systematized information on 
free educational and informational science materials to bro; den "nd en> Lch 
your science curriculum. This sixth edition iisis, classifies and provides com- 
plete information on titles, sources, availability and contents oi 962 free films, 
88 free filmstrips and 273 other free supplementary mat( s from 354 sourc es 
a total of 1,323 free items, of which 333 are new in this edition." 

EDUCATORS GUIDE TO FREE SO CIAL S TUDIES MA TERIALS L965. $6.75, Educators 

Progress Service, Randolph, Wisconsin, 

Following is selected from publishers staiemen's. 

The fifth annual edition of the Educators Guide to Free Social Studies Materials 
is a professional, cyclopedic service based on the cross-media approach in 
teaching. This edition lists, classifies and provides complete information on 
sources, availability and content of 1,393 films, 114 filmstrips, 33 sets of 
slides, 112 tapes, 48 scripts. 114 transcriptions and 408 other materials . a 
total of 2,252 selected free items, 620 of which arc new in this edition, 

EDUCATORS GUIDE TO FREE GUIDANCE MATERIALS 1965 $6.50. Educators Progress 
Service, Randolph, Wisconsin. 

Following is quoted from the publisher: 

"This Guide has been developed as a basic resource for aiding counselors and 
teachers. The fourth edition lists, classifies and provides complete information 
on 443 films, 76 filmstrips, 38 tapes and transcriptions, and 207 other materials - 
bulletins, pamphlets, charts, posters, magazines, and books - a total of 764 
selected free items of which 218 are new. " 

AIDS, November 1965 -6- 




AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION / COLLEGE OF EDUCATION / UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Votec E474 Enrollment , The enrollment in Votec E474, Supervised Agricultural Experience 
Pi'ograms, at Mt. Sterling is twenty -nine„ The enrollment at Williamsville is thirty -eighth 
This course is designed to qualify teachers of agriculture to conduct the 'hew" agriculture 
programs at the high school and adult levels „ It will be offered on the University of Illinois 
campus in the summer of 1966, and it will be offered in District I (Sections 1-5) the first 
semester of 1966-67, 

Ha ndbook for Young Worker s, A new publication which should be a useful student reference 
in schools where vocational agriculture students are engaged in placement -employment 
programs has been released by the U. S. Department of Labor, The publication includes 
information concerning labor laws, employment and training services, and sources of help 
for young workers, Teachers may secure copies of this 29 -page booklet by writing to the 
Superintendent of Documents, I), S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D C. 20402. 
The complete title is Handbo o k for \'oung Worker s, Bulletin 271, and the price is 20C per copy, 

PEH 

Student Teaching Assignments , Twelve students will begin student teaching on November 1. 
1965 and complete student teaching at the start of the Christmas vacation Names of student 
teachers, cooperaling schools, and cooperating teachers are as follows. 

( '(^ opera tin g Teachers 

Loren Mills 



Student Teachers 



Gerald Mayberry 

Mike Still 

James Shaffer 

Frank Barb re 
John Hillison 

Donald Jarrett 
Art Neavill 

Allen Berry 
James Marshall 

Maurice Tompkins 

Roger Allaman 
Dale Howe 



Co operat i ng Schools 
Bel vide re 
Cerro Gordo 
Herscher 
Lawrenceville 

Lincoln 

Mahomet 

Mattoon 
Woodstock 



Donald P rather 
Eldon Chapman 
Jesse Keyser 

Robert Dorch 

Kenneth Knell 

James Leming 
George Forgey 



PEH 



AIDS, November 1965 



Advanced Ce rtifica te in Educa tion Degree . The 'NEW" agriculture program, the extension of 
vocational agriculture into the junior colleges, and new salary schedules have emphasized the 
need for advanced education for teachers of agriculture. A popular degree program is the 
Advanced Certificate in Education, It is a one year program beyond a masters degree Half 
of the course work for this degree may be earned in extramural courses. Eight units 32 
semester hours) of credit are required. The requirements for the degree permit consider- 
able specialization. Advanced Certificate in Education programs are currently being planned 
for the following Illinois teachers of vocational agriculture: 

15. William Renaud 

16„ Emerson Moore, Jr. 

17. Fred Russell, Jr. 

18. Dale Barthel 



1. 


Roy L. Ewalt 


2. 


G. J. Henrick 


3. 


William A. Fortschneider 


4. 


Shaw Terwilliger 


5. 


Thonrns Phelps 


6„ 


V. A. Green 


7. 


Charles R, Hamilton 


8. 


Dorr Simer 


9. 


Vi tgil Butler 


10. 


Clarence J. Kuster 


11. 


Edwin W. Sauer 


12. 


Charles DeHart 


13. 


M. V. Heiderscheid 


14. 


Donald Miller 



LJP 

Placement Report . As of October 1st there are four vacancies for high school teachers of 
vocational agriculture and one vacancy for a, junior college teacher of vocational agriculture 
in Illinois. 

NDE 

E 370 - Section for Teachers of Post Hi gh School Vocational Ag ricul ture, A special section 
of E 370 has been established for the first time to meet the needs of teachers who are teach- 
ing at the post-high schocl level ; Enrollment is open to men and women entering post -high 
school vocational agriculture teaching from business and industry as well as experienced 
teachers who are entering this field, Enrollment for the course has been completed. How- 
ever, arrangements may be made for teachers hired after the beginning of the school year to 
participate in this special section by contacting Dr Gerald R. Fuller, 361 Education Building, 
University of Hlinois, Urbana, Illinois 61803, The following teachers are presently enrolled: 



1. Jesse E = Bradshaw 

2. Paul H Hillis 

3 . Harold D , Huber 

4. Edward R. Kaiser 
5c MrSc Alice Dries 

6„ Maynard L. Boudreau 

7 c Robert Jurgens 

8. Max H. Kuster 

9 Edwin F, Glass 

10 Robert H, Irvin 

11. JohnW. Yabor 

12. Joseph Dallon, Jr. 



Canton Junior College 

Canton Junior College 

Canton Junior College 

Canton Junior College 

Danville Junior College 

Joliet Junior College 

Joliet Junior College 

Joliet Junior College 

Wabash Valley Junior College (Mt 

Wabash Valley Junior College (Mt 

Wabash Valley Junior College (Mt, 



Carmel) 
Carmel) 
Carmel) 



Wilson Branch, Chicago City Junior College 

GRF 



AIDS, November 1965 



-2- 



ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRIOttTLH 

NORJ IAL, ILLINOIS 61761 




AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



Stud ent Teachers for the First Semester. Seven students from Illinois State University will 
begin their student teaching on November 15, 1965, and complete their assignments on 
January 28. 1966, Five of the men will be available for positions on January 28, Names of 
the student teachers and other data regarding their vocational agriculture background and 
availability for positions are: „,, , 



Dennis, Marshall** 
Goodlick, William 

Henze, Dale W. 



*Long, Benjamin** 
Manning, David** 
*Otto, Myron** 

Zimmerman, Howard** 

*State Farmer 
**Available for Position February 1, 1966 



Home 


High School 


Teaching 


High School 


Vo-Ag Teacher 


Center 


Milledgeville 


John Hutching 


Kirkland 


Downs 


Lawrence Gregory 
Clyde Hudelson 


Streato r 


Dakota 


Wayne Schroeder 
Wayne Slotten 
Paul Hoi'mig 


Maroa-Fors;\ 


Warren 


Eldon Aupperle 


Princeville 


Seneca 




Morris 


Chenoa 


Owen Smith 
Stan Sternberg 


Pontiac 


Flanagan 


Howard Cotter 


Lincoln -Way 



Attend th e Conference of Student Teachers in Ag ricultural E du catio n. Members of the 
Agricultural Education class and Dr. Kenneth E. James attended the Fourteenth Annual 
Conference of Student Teachers in Agricultural Education, the National ATA Conclave 
and the National FFA Convention meeting in Kansas City, October 12 to 15, 1965, 

Dr Benton K, Bri stol Joins the Staff of Illinois State University , Department of Agriculture 
Dr Bristol joined the Department of Agriculture Staff on September 1, 1965 He was 

formerly a member of the Agricultural Education Staff of the Pennsylvania State University, 
University Park, Pennsylvania for nine years . Most recently he was on the Ohio State 
University College of Education Faculty in India for two years. His responsibilities will 
be in the areas of Agricultural Engineering and Agricultural Education. 

KEJ 



AIDS, November 1965 




IAVAT 



NEWS 



ILLINOIS ASSN. OF VO-AG TEACHERS 



Your president would like to know how many Illinois vocational agriculture teachers 
will be attending the National Convention of the NVATA. at Miami in December. The first 
session of the NVATA will be Saturday , December 4 at 1.00 p.m 

Please notify me if you will be at Miami for the < invention We are entitled to have 
one voting delegate for each fifty members 01 major fraction thereof, plus the state presi- 
dent „ I am anxious to have that many Illinois delegates, if possible , 

A complete convention program is included in this Lssu< 

The certified delegates at Miami will vcte to amend Article HI, Section 1 of the 
NVATA constitution, which would increase active and associate membership dues to $5,00 
a year and student membership dues to $1 .00 a yeai . 

The Executive Committee of the NVATA voted to submit this proposal to voting 
delegates cf the convention 

Themes for the Ag, Education Magazine for the remainder of 1965 through June 1966 
are as follows: 

November — Research 
December — Planning Local Programs 
January — —Work Experience Programs 
February — In-Service Education 

March Agricultural Education in Community 

and Junior Colleges 

April NVATA 

May Planning Summer Programs 

June Evaluating the Year's Work 

At last report from J W Berger, the following sections have 100% membership 
and paid up dues: 

Sections 3. 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 21, 24 All post high program 
instructors but three have paid up membership A total of 16 teachers, including post high 
instructors, have not paid dues at this time 

This is a fine record, but not good enough. Let's have 100% membership by the 
next report, ****** 

AIDS, November 1965 



The IAVAT share of distribution of net income from the 1965 IVA Convention in Peoria 
is $268.06. 

Our rebate from the AVA will be $714.00, This rebate will be only for this year, re- 
sulting from action taken at the National Convention in Atlantic City in 1964. 

Sectional Public Relations Officers from sections 21. 22, 23, 24, and 25 should submit 
news to Melvin J. Nicol, Maroa, for the December issue. This news should reach Nicol by 
November 12. 

We welcome news from any or all sectional reporters at any date. We also welcome 

news and suggestions from anyone. 

* j 

Jim Becker, Amboy, criticized the Farm Journal for the article they carried on voca- 
tional agriculture last year and said he got no response when he wrote. 

Many of us did not get response either, Jim But I am sure the barrage of letters 
they received from ag teachers was responsible for a favorable article later. 

As ag teachers, let us always take time to fight for the truth. I am sure your loiter 

had some effect, Jim, 

- • 

SECTION 2 NEWS. 

The section 2 Vocational Agriculture Fair was held July 26 and 27.. Eighteen schools 
participated in the fair; 17 boys showed 699 entries. On July 26 beel and sheep and miscel- 
laneous entries were exhibited On July 27 swine and dairv entries were exhibited, 

On September 23 the Section 2 FFA Leadership Tvaming School was held at Milledge\ Le 
High School About 100 boys representing most of the schools in the sed on were in att< ndance 

On September 29 the Section 2 Land Use Selection Contest was held in the Morrison High 
School area with Bob Liehr as host teacher in charge of the contest Sixteen schools had 79 
contestants taking part in the judging The judging started at 1:00 p m, and was concluded by 
4:00 p.m. The contestants were given a practice location to score first with the SCS soil 
scientist giving the correct scoring on that hole 

Arthur L Schick 

Section 2 Public Relations Officer 

SECTION 19 NEWS: 

Section 19 is under the leadership of Bill Rich of Sullivan. Bill has us off to a good 
start = 

A number of "old hands" have left our section Paul Hiilis has taken a job with Canton 
Junior College. Bill Doerr is with Southern Illinois University We understand his title is 
Superintendent of University Farms Charles Lane has taken a job as Farm Manager for the 
Shelbyville Bank We understand Luther Martz is operating a rocking chair this year Luther 
has worked hard to earn this privilege and we hope he enjoys it as much as we have enjoyed 
having him in this section In terms of years of service to the section Kenneth Diehl and 
Lome Hunsley top the list. They are doing a fine job of setting the pa.ee for the rest of up 

Heard at our FFA Leadership Banquet "These new ag; teachers are changing everj - 

thing except how long it takes a cow to have a calf, " Who knows, it may even come to that 

AIDS, November 1965 -2- 



Section 19 has the dubious distinction of having two ag teachers born in Calhoun 

County. No offense meant we just wonder if everything they say about the old home 

is true, ^. . r + 

Our fishingest, coon huntingest ag teacher is Kenny DiehL In addition to these 
activities,he likes to win meat and milk judging contests. Haven't figured it out but there 
must be a connection . Congratulations, Kenny 

E, L, Bosomworth 

Section 19 Public Relations Officer 

SECTION 20 NEWS: 

We have five new teachers in our ranks. William Speers, Kansas; Joseph Berberlch, 
Teutopolis; Harley W. Hicks, Jr , Newton; Forest Kermicle. Dieterich; and Brad Lacey of 
Neoga , 

This year we are sponsoring a sectional FFA quarterly newsletter. Each chapter 
reporter mimeographs 30 pages of local news and submits it to out Sectional Reporter. 
He in turn assembles the news and staples the sectional news activities on top. These 
news bulletins are then distributed at our bi-monthly ag teachers meetings. 

Some interesting activities are presently being conducted in our chapters, About 
half of our chapters are having either a. wiener roast or hamburger fry with their FHA 
Newton, Kansas and Martinsville are operating chain gilt projects Oblong and Mattoon 
are building their homecoming floats with their FHA Chapters. Robinson ha.s conducted 
some successful scrap drives, using the money for a summer fishing trip. Burl Hocking, 
retired teacher from Robinson is spending his time farming and fishing 

Carl E Chapman 

Section 20 Public Relations Officer 

William J Brinkley, Section 25 Reporter, was successful in getting eight teachers 
from his section to return news questionnaires Here are gleanings from the questionnaires: 

M, L Renaud, Metropolis, received his M S . n.t S, i U in August Renoud stai- 
a teacher's most difficult years are when he is too tired to teach and too broke to quit 
Renoud lists September 9 as a red letter day. No announcements over the P A. system 
i rum the office all day., 

William J Brinkley, McLeansboro. is teaching a new course this year * It is listed 
as General Agriculture I Bill lost his father. W, G Brinkley, on October 2 He was 
former mayor of Shawneetown and a big landowner and business man in Gallatin Countj 
Our deepest sympathy goes to Bill and his family Bill has been named to the steering com- 
mittee of the new college being considered hi his area. His FFA chapter has entered the 
Valley Forge Freedoms Foundation Program. 

It's a boy at the home of Mr, and Mrs. C, E Cox, Jcppa Cox reports that the 
best fishing spot in the world is on the Ohio river, his front yard He also states that he 
is boss at. home when his wife is gone 

Ernie Johnson, Carmi, is teaching three science classes this year He thinks it 
might be four next year A freshman in Ernie's class defines a barrow as a "cut gilt " 

Richard Sutton, Eldorado, scored a double the past summer S l.U presented himthe 
M S. degree in June and his wife presented him with a boy in May 

AIDS, November 1965 -3- 



Mr. and Mrs Robert Wheeler, Norris City, are proud parents of daughter, 
Lori Annette, born August 17. 

Most of the teachers in Section 25 seem to be reporting increased enrollments at home 
and in ag classes. They also seem to be getting in their share of hunting and fishings 

* i ■ r .i • - 

Our congratulations go to G, Donavon Coil who received fhe Honorary American 
Farmer Degree at the National FFA Convention, We all know Don is mosl deserving of this 
high honor, 

Our congratulations also go to the Sycamore and William sfield FFA. chapters, winners 
of Gold Emblem Awards at the National Convention, to the Chcnca FFA Chapter Tor having the 
top FFA dairy judging team at the National Contest ai Waif .Ice, [owa; to the Shelbyville FFA 
meat and milk judging teams for winning the state contest in both divisions., 

■ 

Nellie bought a new dress 

It was so vpry thin; 

She asked me how I liked it, 

So, 1 answered with a grin; 

"Wait, till the sun shines Nellie." 

From Illinois Crop Association News Lettei 



The following was taken from 3 letter to beginning teachers of Agricultural Education 
in New Mexico from -1 D McComas, Head oi 'he Department of Agricultural Education, 
New Mexico State University 

PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILIT [ES 

We are certain that you are pleased to be a part of a high school faculty as a teach* 
agricultural education During your first year of teaching you will likely find this to be one of 
the busiest, but most rewarding years of your life You will undoubtedly 'earn more in the 
coming year than in the previous four. With your new teaching assignment comes many pro- 
fessional obligations Seven of these include; 

(1) Being a member of the faculty and accepting full responsibility for all duties and 
assignments: identifying as a member of a teaching team - not stressing differences in your 
program but helping to complement the total school offerings 

(2) Setting an example for youth vnd adults through in and out of school behavior which 
will not bring reproach on you or your school 

(3) Being concerned about the total school and community and doing your shar< to 
improve both 

(4) Being competent as a teacher; keeping up-to-date in subject-matter, staying alert 
and prepared for each hour of class; and helping your students to learn in your field and any 
others in which you can help. 



AIDS, November 1965 -4- 



(5) Believing in the professional area in which you are teaching; assuming always 
that your subject is as important as others in the curriculum and teaching in a manner that 
confirms this assumption 

(6) Observing the policies and regulations of your local school and by supporting 
your administration and faculty; and by dressing in a manner which helps yon look like a 
professional. 

(7) Joining and taking active part in professional teacher organizations and making 
sure thai thej are strengthened, not weakened by your membership in them. 

t * .- 

AGRICULTURAL DIVISION CONVENTION (TENTATIVE) PROGRAM 

MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA 
December 4-10 



Saturday, December 4 

10:00 - 11:30 A.M 

1:00 - 2:15 P.M. 

2:30 - 5:00 P.M 

6:00 - 9:30 P.M. 



NVATA First General Session 
NVATA Special Program 
NVATA First Regional Meetings 
NVATA State President's Dinner 
Sponsored by - Swift & Company 



Sunday, December 5 
8:00 - 9:30 A.M 

9:00 - 11:30 A.M. 

1:00 - 2:30 P.M. 
1:30 - 4:00 P M 

2:45 - 3:45 P,M. 
4:00 - 5:00 P M 

8:00 P.M 



NVATA Breakfast - Combined Agricultural 

Groups and Wives 
Sponsored by A. O Smith Harvestore 
Meeting of Ohi<; Center Agricultural 

Education Advisory Boaid 
NVATA Second General Session 
Meeting of Ohio Center Agricultural 

Education Advisory Board 
NVATA Group Meetings 
Reception - Combined Agricultural Edu- 
cation Groups and Wives 
Sponsored by Alabama. Georgia and Florida. 
Executive Committee Meeting of AATEA 



Monday. December 6 

8:30 A.M 
8:30 - 10:45 AM 
11:00 - 11:45 A.M 
12:00 - 1:15 P.M, 

9:00 - 11:00 A.M. 
1:30 - 5:00 P.M 
4:00 - 5:30 P.M., 
6:00 P.M. 



Ag Division Committee Meetings 
Agriculture Education Executive Committee 
Advisory Committee - Ag Division of AS \ 

Luncheon Meeting - Agricultural Education 

Advisory Committee and Executive Committee 
Second NVATA Regional Meetings 
Tour of Miami School Farm 
Executive Council Meeting 
NVATA Past Officers Meeting 



(cont ) 



AIDS, November 1965 



-o- 



(cont \ 

Tuesday, December 7 
7:00 - 8:30 A.M. 

9:00 - 11:30 A.M. 
1:30 - 5:30 P.M 

6,00 P.M. 
8:00 P.M. 

Wednesday. December 8 
7:30 - 11:30 A M 

7:30 - 11:30 AM 
7-30 - 11:30 A.M. 
9:45 AM 
12:00 - 1:30 P.M. 



2:00 



4:30 P M 
8:00 P.M. 



Breakfast Meeting - combined agricultural 

groups and wives 
Joint meeting with other vocational sen ices 
Editing-Managing Board Meeting. Agricultural 

Education Magazine 
Dinner meeting, Editing -Managing Board 
Firsi A.VA Genera] Session 



NVATA Breakfast meeting — for members and 

wives 
Sponsored by - Alii s -Chalmers 
State Supervisors Breakfast 
Teacher Educators Breakfast 
NVATA. Final General Session 
Luncheon- -combined Agricultural Education 

Groups and Wives 
Sponsored by Internationa] Harveste] 
Combined Agricultural Education Groups 

visit exhibits 
AVA Second General Session 



[Thursday, December 9 

8:30 - 10:45 AM. 
11:00 - 12:00 Nom 

Thursday P.M. 



Friday, December 10 

8.30 - 10:45 AM 
I 10:30 - 12:00 Noon 

1:00 - 2:30 P.M 



- Combined Agricultural Education Croups 

- Combined Agricultural Education Groups 
Business meeting 

- (OPEN; no program for agricultural education 

groups 



- Combined Agricultural Education Groups 

- Combined agricultural education groups 
Business meeting 

- AVA House of Delegates 



a- r * 



AIDS, November 1965 



Xtear_§heet)_ 



Order Form for Animal Science Course Materials 



Materials used in the 1965 Animal Science one -day short courses are available in 
packets as listed below. A list of the items included in each packet is on the back of this 
sheet for your reference. Orders for individual publications cannot be handled at this time. 



Number 
Desired 



Swine Facilities P cket 
Ruminant Facilitie s Packet 
Breeding and Marketing Packet 



Price * 
1.00 
.50 
,50 



Total 



The Midwest Plan Books displayed at the one -day courses are available. They 
have been previously sent in Agricultural Releases. If you wish additional copies, they 
may be ordered by checking below. 



Swine Equipment Plans and Housing Needs 

Beet Equipment Plans 

Dany Equipment Plans and Housing Needs 

Sheep Equipment Plans 

Poultry Equipment Plans 



1,00 
1.00 
1.00 

1,00 
1 . Of. 



Additional copies oi publications fi-om commercial agencies that were used in ih«- 
one-day courses should be ordered diiect from the companies involved* 



^Prices do not include postage. 



Name 

School 

Address 



Vocational Agriculture Service 

434 Mumford Hall 

Urbana, Illinois 



MDS, November 1965 



CONTENTS OF PACKETS 
(For reference only. Individual items not available except in complete packets) 



I 



SWINE FACILITIES PACKET 

Is Confinement Swine Housing Here to Stay? D. F. Wilken, Agr. Econ. Dept. , 7 pages 
Some Adjustments Made by Early Adopters of Confinement Production of Hogs. 

Ray Van Arsdall, Agr. Econ. Dept., 10 pages 
How to Build a Successful Confinement Hog System. A. J. Muehling, Agr.Eng. Dept. , 12 pages 
Slotted Floors for Swine. E. L. Hansen, Agr. Eng. Dept., 10 pages 
Farrow-to -Finish Swine Buildings. D. G. Jedele, Agr. Eng. Dept., 7 pages 
Insulation for Farm Buildings. A. J. Muehling, Agr. Eng. Dept., 9 pages 
Ventilation of Livestock Buildings. D. R. Daum and D. L. Day, Agr. Eng. Dept., 19 pages 
Swine Housing (Description of Available Plans). Agr. Eng. Dept. , 2 pages 

Swine System. A. J. Muehling and G. R. Carlisle, Agr. Eng. and Agr. Econ. Depts., 12 pages 
Economic Evaluation of Proposed Hog System. A. G.Mueller, Agr. Econ. Dept., 5 pages 
A Confinement Swine Building with Partially Slotted Floors. 

A. J. Muehling and D. G. Jedele, Agr.Eng. Dept., 
Guides for Use in Planning Hog Production Systems. R. A. Hinton, Agr. Econ. Dept., 11 pages 
Inputs and Retulrns from Hog Production Systems. A. G. Mueller and A. J. Muehling, Agr. Econ. 

and Agr. Eng. Depts. , 13 pages 
Your Hog Business. How Big? How Good? Agr. Econ. Dept., 12 pages 

RUMINANT FACILITIES PACKET 

Value of Shelters for Beef Cattle. Vocational Agriculture Service, 1 page 

Guides for Use in Planning Beef Feeding Systems. Roy N. Van Arsdall, Agr. Econ. Dept. , 16 page 

Beef Buildings (Description of Available Plans). Agr. Eng. Dept. , 1 page 

Management, The Key to Maximum Returns. G. E. Ricketts, An. Sci. Dept., 4 pages 

Ewe and Lamb Management Studies, 1964. J. M. Lewis, F. C. Hinds & M. E. Mansfield, Ans. 

Dept. and Vet. Med. , 3 pages 
Specific-Parasite-Free Lambs. M. E. Mansfield, Vet. Med., 1 page 
Grade A Milk Law. 111. Dept. of Public Health, 8 pages 
Equipment, Practices, Investments and Annual Costs Associated with Tower and Bunker Silo 

Systems. Esmay, Boyd, and Hoglund, Mich. State 

Univ. , 16 pages 
Comparative Storage Losses and Feeding Values of Alfalfa and Corn Silage Crops When Harvested 
at Different Moisture Levels and Stored in Gas-Tight and Conventional Tower Silows. 
C. R. Hoglund, Mich. State Univ. , 16 pages 

BREEDING AND MARKETING PACKET 

Market Hogs - 8 Markets Combined - By Months. Vocational Agriculture Service, 1 page 

Slaughter Steers - Choice Grade - Chicago - By Months. Vocational Agr. Service, 1 page 

Wool - Chicago - By Months. Vocational Agr. Service, 1 page 

Futures Trading in Live Cattle and Dressed Beef. M. B. Kirtley, Agr. Econ. Dept. , 4 pages 

The Desirability of a Cattle Futures Market. T. A. Hieronymus, Agr. Econ, Dept. , 5 pages 

Futures Trading in Beef Cattle. Vocational Agr. Service, 1 page 

Types of Hog Markets in Illinois. Vocational Agr. Service Unit 2029, 12 page 

Federal Orders for Marketing Milk. Vocational Agr. Service, 11 pages 

Present Status of Swine Artificial Insemination and Ovulation Control. Philip Dziuk, An. Sci. Dept. 

2 pages 
Average Heritability of Swine Traits. Vocational Agr. Service, 1 page 
Heritability of Beef Traits. Vocational Agr. Service, 1 page 
Artificial Insemination of Livestock. Vocational Agr. Service Unit 1002a, 8 pages 






(tear sheet) 

TO: Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61803 

Please send the following items: 

Number Price * Amount Item 



$3,25 Safety Glasses With Side Shields 

(per pair) 

1,40 Flexible plastic mask goggles 

(per pair) 

.85 1965 National Electrical Code 

1 00 Illinois Farm Record Book (Parts J and H) 

.05 _____ A Farm Record Problem-1964 (tor use with abov« book) 

. 50 Key to 1964 Farm Record Book Problem for new record book 



"Prices do not include postage 



N am e Sc h oo 1 

Address 



Bill ing 



AIDS, November 1965 



INDEX TO ITEMS IN VO-AG SERVICE SECTION 

Page 

Additional Career Information . , , . . . , 5 

Animal Science Course Materials .......... . . . , ...... 3 

Club Calf Sale ...... ........ 3 

Electric Motors from Emerson Electric Co.. ..... . . . . ... 4 

Electrical Wiring Boxes , . . . . . 3 

FFA Roadside Signs. . . 2 

Honor Students Take Vo-Ag ....... .... 4 

Illinois Farm Record Books, Problems, and Keys ......... . . . 1 

In-Service Courses Scheduled ....... , . . 1 

Job Opportunities for Ag College Graduates ........... . . 4 

National Directory of Safety Films ............. . 5 



New Books . ...... 

New Bulletins ... 

1965 National Electrical Code . . 

Off-Farm Ag Occupations Materials 



e c i 



6 
4 
2 
5 



oclIG Xy vjIcLSSGS ■ • .<><>. <• * <■ * • _*^ 



AIDS, November 1965 



ORDER DIRECT FROM 

The Center for Research and Leadership Development 
in Vocational and Technical Education 
The Ohio State University 
980 Kinnear Road 
Columbus, Ohio 1+3212 



ORDER FORM 



Name; 



Address: 



Title or Description 


Number 
of Items 
Ordered 


Cost 

Per 

Unit 


r 

Total 
Cost 


1. 


Policy and Administrative Decisions in Introducing 
Vocational and Technical Education in Agriculture 
for Off-Farm Occupations (for boards and adminis- 
trators of local schools, area schools, & colleges) 

Vocational and Technical Education in Agriculture 
for Off-Farm Occupations (for counselors, teachers, 
board members, and administrators at all levels) 

Summary of Research Findings in Off-Farm 
Agricultural Occupations 

Planning and Conducting Cooperative Occupational 
Experience in Off-Farm Agriculture 

Occupational Guidance for Off-Farm Agriculture 
(for guidance counselors and students — available 
after January 1, 1966) 

Horticulture - Service Occupations (Course 
outline and twelve modules) 

Agricultural Supply - Sales and Service Occupations 
(Course outline and twelve modules) 

Agricultural Machinery - Service Occupations 
(Course outline and sixteen modules) 

Agricultural Chemical Technology (Course outline 
and nine modules—available after January 1, 1966) 

Organizing to Provide Agricultural Education for 
Off-Farm Occupations (of primary value to state 
staffs when working with groups planning programs 
in off-farm occupations. This consists of 18 
mimeographed sheets from which transparencies can 
be made. ) 




.50 




2. 




• 50 




3- 




.60 




k. 




1.20 




5- 




• 30 




6. 




5.25 




7. 




5.00 




8. 




6.50 




9- 


Price will be s 
when avai lable 


2t 


10. 




•25 





AIDS, November 1965 



PRICE LIST OF FEEDS 



1/ 



The feed prices for many of the feedstuffs used in vocational agriculture projects are listed 
belowc This list is meant to be used as a basis of values for all boys obtaining their feed at 
home. Feed purchased should be recorded at prices paid. 



Kind of feed 



October 18 



Corn, shelled, bu. • - 

Corn, ground shelled or ear corn, bu 
Oats, bu, , . . . o ....... 

Oats, ground, bu.. . , 

Barley, (feed) bu.. , . < 
Barley, grounder rolled, bu. . , 
Grain sorghum, cwt, ....... 

Grain sorghum, cracked, cwt. . . , 
Skim and buttermilk, cwt. . . . 

Whole milk, Grade B, cwt, < . 

Corn silage, ton „ . 

Sorghum silage, ton , . . . . 

Haylage, ton . „ . . . 

Clover and mixed hay) 

Alfalfa " ) 

Timothy ) 

Oat or wheat straw ) 



All hay and straw prices 
are for baled. Figure 
loose at $5 less per ton.. 



— Prepared in cooperation with the Department of Agricultural Economics. 
2/ 

— Or convert to dry hay equivalent containing 90 percent dry matter. 

Pasture Rates 



*Calves and colts: 

6-11 months 
12 - 24 months 
over 24 months 

Lambs to weaning 
Sheep - yearlings 

and mature 
Pigs, 50 to 100 lbs. 



Cost per day 


$ 
$ 


.06 

.09 
12 


$ 


01 


$ 
$ 


.025 
0025 



$ 1,02 

1.12 

a 62 

.72 

.90 

1.00 

1.90 

,00 

.50 

00 

9 50 

8,50 

14 00i±/ 

22 . 00 

23,00 

20,00 

17.00 



2, 
1, 

3 



^Reduce by 2/3 for full-fed cattle, by 1/3 for limited fed cattle 



AIDS, November 1965 



VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE SERVICE 

UnlvwiOy of llllneli ■ C*lf«g« o* Agriculture 

434 MUMFORD HAIL • URBAN A, ILLINOIS 



SERIALS DEPARTMENT 
UNLJ Oi ILL LIBRARY 



SSHL 



"M~2 j 



VO-AG AIDS 






Volume 24, Number 5 
December 1965 



Issued jointly by 
Vocational Agriculture Service, College of Agriculture 

and 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

in Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 



VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 



J n -Service Co urses S cheduled. The following courses have been requested and are tentatively 
scheduled Teachers in the sections involved will be notified directlv but in most cases there 
is room for a few additional teachers from nearby sections who may be interested If you are 
from outside the section and wish to attend, please notify Vocational Agriculture Service at 
once. We will then notify the host school so that they can plan on you and will send you last 
minute details 



Date 

December 1 
December 2 

December 4 
December 6 
December 8 

December 13 
December 15 
January 8 
January 15 
Januarv 19 



Course 

New Farm Acct Book 
Electrical Controls 

Small Engines 

New Farm Acct Book 

New Farm Acct Book 

New Farm Acct Book 
New Farm Acct Book 
Small Engines 
Tractor Tune-Up 
Electrical Controls 



Place 


Section 


Starting Time 


Olney 


23 


7 p , m 


Carthage (Western 


11 


4pm 


ill Elec Coop ) 






Freeport 


1 


9 am 


Dixon 


2 


5 p . m 


Perry (Wagon Wheel 


13 


4:30 p m 


Restaurant) 






Salem 


21 


6pm 


Mu rphysboro 


24 


4:30 p m 


Ann aw an 


3 


9 a m. 


Beason 


14 


9am 


Neoga 


20 


4pm 

JWM 



LlUj!pJ5_Farm R_ecgrd_Books The new books were received shortly after November 1 and 
all orders have been filled to date Already more than 1 5 200 copies have been sent to 
schools Record book materials are again included on the tear sheet for your convenience 
in ordering T ™ 

Labor and Manage ment Earn ings Sheets for Livestock and Crop Enterprises Samples of 
these sheets for use with 'Records of My Farming Program" have been included in the 
December Agricultural Releases A. few extra single copies are still available from this 
office for teachers who are not Agr Release subscribers Quantity copies are available 
from Interstate Printers and P ublishe rs, Danville, Illinois at a price of 25£ per pack of 
20 sheets This is the item that the Special Projects committee and the LAV AT Executive 
committee recommended be made available for teachers who wish to use them Besides 
providing more information to students and teachers, the item may be of help in connec- 
tion with the FFA Foundation Awards program THH 

Coded Co pies of Income Tax Schedule F and Schedule D Single copies of this item were 
included with the December Agr Releases The item shows how you would obtain figures 
for filling out income tax reports from the new Illinois Farm Record Books Farmers 
will, of course, not be using these copies until they have kept a year's record in the new 
book They were sent merely to illustrate how the filling in of tax reports could be handl- 
ed at the end of the year 

JHH 



ATDS, December 1965 



1965 National Electrical Cede Our supply of 1965 National Electrical C and 

ail orders thai were being held have been filled They are available at 85£ per ,ius 

postage, and are again included on the tear sheet in case you wish to order. 

RFE 

S afety Glasses On the basis of orders received by November 15- following the announce- 
ment in the November AIDS, we have ordered 500 pairs of approved safet\ r glasses with side 
shields and 250 pairs of flexible plastic mask goggles This is about 100 pairs more of each 
type than we had ordered by schools on November 15. Time of delivery is uncertain but 
will fill orders as soon as we receive our supply These items are repeated on the tear sheet 
in case you still wish to order 

JWM 

New Slidefilms . Shortly after receiving the December AIDS, you should be getting the second 
advance order shipment of six new slidefilms, as follows: 

433 Planning and Preparing for Concrete Masonry Construction 

434 Laying Concrete Masonry 7 Units 

435 Special Concrete Masonry Problems 
370-65 Inventory Your Resources (a revision of 370) 

371-65 Plan the Land-Use Program and Estimate Crop Production (revision of 371) 
792 Identification of Weeds - Part II (color) 

If you have an advance order for slidefilms and do not receive these promptly, please let us 

know, They are listed on the tear sheet for open sale ^^ „ 

J F RLC 

Teachers Guide to Flower Arrangement was included in December Agricultural Releases A 
very limited number of additional copies are available for 35£ plus postage for these who did 
not get a copy of this 40-page publication in Releases, „,,, 

Tapes on Careers in Agriculture . We are beginning a series of tape recordings on careers 
in agriculture Each tape is 20 to 30 minutes long and is recorded at 7 J ips Three tapes 
have been prepared so far and more will follow. Those now available are: 
No. 1. Stepping Stones to Success in the College of Agriculture - 

Dean CD. Smith and Dean W K Wessels 
No, 2, Choosing a Career in Agronomy - Dr M D Thorne and Dr A. W Burger 
No, 3. Choosing a Career in Ornamental Horticulture - Dr J B. Gartner. 
Mr J. D Butler, and Dr J C. Carbonneau 
The price of each of these tapes is $1. 50 if you send in your own tape, or $3. 50 if we furnish 
a new tape These prices do not include shipping charges These tapes are listed on the tear 
sheet in case you wish to order. RT C 

Soil Samples of Known Soil -Test Value The Field and Furrow Club has again made up new 
standard soil samples of known soil -test value . Each sample is a pint in size and has been 
carefully tested by the University soil testing laboratory There are six different samples 
■ which range in soil test values as follows: pH 4 5-7 7: P^ 5-30 lbs : P£ 6-115 lbs : 
K 68-300 lbs. The cost of the set of six samples is $15. 00 plus postage They are listed on 
the tear sheet. 

RLC 

Programmed Instruction Series No 403 Revised . Don Barrett of Harvard called our atten- 
tion to the need for revising Programmed Instruction Series No. 403, Understanding Soils, 
Part I to make it correspond with the information in 111 Cir. 758, revised. This has been 
'done and a single copy of this revised item was included in December Agricultural Releases 
: Quantity copies are now available in packages of 20 at 20C per package, plus postage, and 
this item is included on the tear sheet 

AIDS, December 1965 -2- 



RFE 



Corn Packets The subject-matter packet on corn production is stili available at $1 75 plus 
postage It is included again on the tear sheet for your convenience rt r 

Operat or's Manuals for Ford Tractors and Equipment The following is in addition to the in- 
formation which was included in the October AIDS: Ford Motor Company, Tractor and Imple- 
ment Operations (U S ) is willing to supply one copy of specific operator's manuals requested 
by teachers of vocational agriculture without charge . Requests should be directed to 

Mr Floyd Walton, Dealer Services Supervisor 

Kansas City Supply Depot 

Ford Motor Co , Tractor & Implement Operations (U S ) 

1227 East 119th Street 

Grandview, Missouri 64030 

Prices on quantities may be obtained by contacting Mr Walton 

Ag. Guest Pay in Retrospect We are indebted to Dean C D Smith of the College of Agri- 
culture for the following; 

'The October 23, 1965, Ag Student College Guest Day drew the larg- 
est attendance ever with 1176 people registered and an estimated total 
attendance of 1300 There were 98 ag teachers and 27 extension personnel 
in attendance, along with some 88 parents and 862 high school students 

"The 'Oscars for October' go to Livingston County with 43 and Vermilion 
County with 39 students registered Forty counties were represented by 10 
or more students each and another 44 counties sent one to nine representa- 
tives 

"Attendance at the interest group sessions was excellent, with many 
rooms filled to overflowing Naturally, we are well pleased with the response 
to this event, and especially since there were two 'Guest Days' held in 1965-- 
last March and then again in October 

'The support and interest of the ag teachers, extension personnel and 
ag alumni is appreciated " 

CDS/JWM 

Scien ce in Agriculture The following message of interest to teachers of agriculture was 
written by Dean Karl E Gardner of the College of Agriculture. 

'SCIENCE is the magic word these days' Someone has calculated that 
90 percent of all the scientists who ever lived are still alive today This 
describes the very recent fantastic increase in the number of research 
workers who are involved in obtaining through research the facts and the 
discoveries which man needs to advance himself in all fields of endeavor 

"Too many young men and women in today's high schools have not 
learned that there are outstanding opportunities for research and service 
in the biological, sociological and physical sciences as related to agricul- 
ture These science areas of deepest interest to agriculture include: 
chemistry, geology, botany, zoology, plant and animal physiology, anatomy, 
genetics, plant and animal pathology, nutrition, endocrinology, statistics, 
sociology, and economics 

AIDS. December 1965 -3- 



"A brochure entitled 'Threads of Life' is included in the December Agri- 
cultural Releases going to Illinois teachers and we hope you will read it to gain 
a clearer comprehension of the intimate involvement of basic science in our 
fast moving agricultural technology Show the booklet to your students If any 
of them want a free copy, have them write individually to my office and we shall 
send a copy. 

"Further, we hope that you will show this book to the science te ache rs in 
your high school and discuss with them the o pportunities for young people in the 
sciences related to agriculture and in the technologies which utilize these 
sciences If you need additional copies for the science teachers who show a 
sincere interest in this subject, please let us know and we shal] provide them 
for you . 

'Over 40 percent of the graduates of the College of Agriculture at the 
University of Illinois now go on for graduate study and this involves scientific 
research, These students upon completing their advanced degrees will rttempt 
to solve the many agricultural problems which continue to plague us such as the 
control of weeds, problems of adequate water supply, control cf toxic agents. 
the control of new virus diseases in our field crops, the improvement of the 
fertility of our livestock, a better understanding of the kinds, amounts, and 
placement of fertilizers in the various types of soils and with the several crops, 
the more efficient utilization of roughages for ruminants, and the more efficient 
management of capital, labor and other resources in farm management 

'Will you take the time to confer with the high school counselors as well 
as the science teachers in physics, biology, chemistry, and general sciences 
in this matter? We can and should encourage a great many more young people 
to attend the agricultural colleges of this State and other stales. In these col- 
leges there is less crowding and as a result more individual attention is made 
readily available to the interested student " 

KEG/JWM 

Ne w Bulletins and Circu lars Three new circulars have been received since the last issue 
of the AIDS A single copy of each was included in December Agricultural Releases Their 
titles with prices for quantity distribution to out-of-state readers are: 
Circular 916 Drying Shelled Corn - 10£ 
Circular 918 What Is a Fair Crop-Share Lease - 152 
Circular 919 Free- Stall Housing for Dairy Cattle - 10£ 

JWM 

Miracle of G rass Our attention has been called to a 22 -minute 16mm sound film in color 
entitled "Miracle of Grass " This film presents the uses of grass for lawn and turf and 
shows and explains the preparation of ground for seeding and the maintenance of grass The 
film may be booked without charge except return postage by writing to: 

Mr Joe W Jarvis 

Supervisor of Agricultural Development 

Union Pacific Railroad 

Omaha, Nebraska 

You may wish also to write to Mr Jarvis for a listing of 17 other Union Pacific Railroad 
films on other agricultural subjects TWM 

AIDS, December 1965 -4- 



Inf orma tion on College Entrance Folded in this issue of the AIDS is a summary of the 
remarks made by Dean C D Smith at Ag College Student Guest Day It covers admission 
requirements and procedures, costs, scholarships, loan funds and housing This may help 
answer questions your students have about entering the College of Agriculture 

-JWM 

Special Not e to Teach ers Vocational Agriculture Service has maintained a policy for many 
years of arranging or conducting in-service courses on any agricultural subject for teachers 
whenever 6 or more sign up to attend We had a recent experience when four teachers in one 
section failed to come after having sent in cards stating they would attend We realize that 
emergencies may arise and under those circumstances we would appreciate having you notify 
us, by telephone if necessary, so that courses ma\ be cancelled if attendance is to be below 
the minimum 

JWM 

Privileged and Unclassifi ed M otions (Scrambled Book No 504) is the fourth of the series of 
parliamentary procedure scrambled books, based on the booklet "A Guide to Parliamentary 
Practices " A single copy is being included in the December Agricultural Releases Addi- 
tional copies, as listed on the tear sheet, are available at 10c each plus postage „, Tm , 

^ ^ WHW 

Dairy Calf Sale Professor J G Cash of the Dairy Science Department has asked us to 
announce the 18th annua] PDCA dairy calf sale to be held at the Stock Pavilion on Saturday. 
February 26, 1966 A copy of the catalog will be sent to each vocational agriculture teacher 
in Illinois as soon as they are off the press If the catalog does not answer all of your ques- 
tions, please contact Professor Cash or notify Vocational Agriculture Service and we will trj 
to get the answer for you 

JCC/WHW 

Special E vents Don't forget the following: 

ILLINOIS TURF CONFERENCE - Urbana. December 2-3, 1965 

SHEEP DAY - Urbana. December 10. 1965 



AIDS. December 1965 






NEW BOOKS 



The following have been added to our library since the last 
issue of the AIDS All of our books are available for review- 
in our office by those interested As long as the editions are 
current, they will be included in such exhibits as the one at 
the Annual Conference of Vocational Agriculture Teachers 



FU NDAME NTALS OF SOIL SCIENCE Millar, Turk and Foth. 4th Ed. 1965 $9 95 John 
Wiley and Sons, New York 

The following statements are made by the publisher: 

'The fourth edition of Fundamentals of Soil Science represents a major revision 
of this fundamental text, which i reats the properties of soils and their relation 
to plant growth, soil genetics, and the distribution of the major kinds of soils 
in the world It introduces plant nutrition and deals with the use of fertilizers 
and other major management problems " 

WHEAT: BOTANY, CULTIVA TION AND UTILIZATION R F Peterson 1965. $16 00 
John Wiley & Sons, New York 

This is quoted fi'om the publisher's description of the book: 

'This book is designed to give a broad outline of the tetany, cultivation and 
utilization of wheat, following the pattern laid down by the World Crop Series 
Although there is an extensive literature on the subject, it has never before 
been made readily available in one comprehensive volume suitable for the 
general reader or student of agriculture " 



AIDS, December 1965 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION / COLLEGE OF EDUCATION / UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Student Lead ers Students who are serving as officers for the Agricultural Education Club 
and Alpha Tau Alpha during the fall semester a.nd their home high schools are as follows: 



President 

Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Reporter 

Ag Council Representative 



A gricultural Education Clu b 



Robert Potts 
Warren Fink 
Pete Cahill 
Carl Awe 
Ron Wesbecher 
John Dittmer 



Wiiliamsfield 

Beason 

B rimf ield 

Lincoln 

Sparta 

Bo wen 



President 

First Vice President 

Second Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Ag Council Representative 



Alpha Tau Alpha 

Allen Hornbrook 
Gerald Theobald 
Robert Potts 
Pete Cahill 
Bill Johnson 
Dave Bechtel 



Young America 
Buffalo (Tri-City) 
Wiiliamsfield 
Brimfield 
Kane land 
Eureka 

PEH 



College of Agriculture Stude nt G uest Day Eighty persons attended the interest group 
meetings concerned with Agricultural Education and Agricultural Extension during the 
College of Agriculture Student Guest Day on October 23, 1965 Sixty-two high school 
students and 4 college students were in attendance Parents, teachers of agriculture, 
and farm advisers were also in attendance The Agricultural Education and Agricul- 
tural Extension interest groups participated in a program dealing with employment op- 
portunities in teaching and extension, teacher education scholarships, and the curriculum 
and activities in agricultural education at the University of Illinois Dr Robert Warmbrod 
and Dr Lloyd -3 Phipps of the Division of Agricultural Education and Dr Ernest Anderson, 
Professor of Extension Education, conducted the program 

JRW 

Votcc 449 This independent study course is available to teachers of vocational agricul- 
ture who have completed three units of work in education If you are interested in enrol- 
ling in Votec 449 the second semester of 1965-1966, please get in touch with us soon En- 
rollment in this course necessitates advanced planning A written plan must be submitted 
and approved prior to enrollment T ,„ 

LJ }r 

Plac em ent Re port As of November 10, 1965, there were three high school vocational. 

agriculture vacancies listed with our placement office There are 6 seniors who will qualify 

for teaching at the end of the current semester ..„„ 

NDE 

AIDS, December 1965 



S light Decrease in Freshman Class Twenty-five freshmen are enrolled in Agricultural Edu- 
cation for the fall semester. 1965-66. This number represents a slight decrease from the 27 
freshmen enrolled last fall The overall undergraduate enrollment in Agricultural Education 
has increased from 100 last fall to 115 for the fall semester 1965-66. 

Freshmen students, their home high schools, and the names of their vocational agriculture 
teachers are listed below: 



Name 
Bettis, Kenneth R. 

Bunch, Edward A 
Clark, Jack D 

Cornwell, David R 
Curry, Duane A 
Drake, Harold L 
Hendrickson, Robert Jr 
Higgins, Steve K 
Ishmael . Larry Allen 
Johnson, David G 

Kunath, Henry T 
Landis, Alan F 
Orr, John R 
Redington, Lloyd M 
Rice, William C 
Schneider, Dan L 
Schroeder, Harold R 
Shafer, Warren C 
Smith, Ronald N 
Thompson, Lester 1 
Thompson, Terry L 
Troutt, Stephen A 
Vaughan , Harold E . 
Via, Leslie B 
Whitson, David Haley 



High School 
Carlinville 

Saunemin 
Woodstock 

Martinsville 

Alwood H S 

Beason 

Rochester 

Alexis 

Greenville 

Salem 

Pope Co H S 

Rock Falls 

West Frankfort 

Galena 

Alwood H , S 

Mascoutah 

Tolono 

Chntsworth 

Stonington 

Broadlands 

Toledo 

Sandoval 

Fairfield 

Eldorado 

Nauvoo 



Agr Teacher 

Gary L. Ellis 
Stanley Klaus 
John R Ba.rtley Jr 
George Forgey 
William Pictor 
John 3eaty 
Keith Clement 
Dorr Simer 
Dale Barthel 
Thomas Knox 
Carl S Brock 
Kenneth Poole 
Robert Cone 
L Edward Turner 
Royal McCormick 
Ronald Smith 
Willis McKinney 
Keith Clement 
Robert Milligan 
J Clark Esarey 
Lyle Cox 
Evan Allen 
B R. Littlefield 
Don Rogers 
Roy Rodgers 
Herman T McDonald 
Ray L Reece 
Mervin Mixer 



MBM 



AIDS, December 1965 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

CARBONDAIE \\\\ ^-^ ILLINOIS 



School of Agriculture 



>(, Agricultural Industries Department 



C urriculum Changes in Vocat ion al Agriculture 1964-65. Smdent teaching being recognized 
as one of the very important phases of agricultural education training, has been increased 
from 10 quarter hours to 12 quarter hours with two additional weeks spent in the cooperat- 
ing school In addition to the two-week summer practice, all students will spend eight weeks 
during the professional quarter in the cooperating school 

ESW 

Prr-Service a nd I n-Ser vice T rainin g. 1964-65, Seventy undergraduate students in the 
School of Agriculture last year were vocational agriculture majors It appears that this 
number will be considerably higher this year Nineteen vocational agriculture teachers 
who were employed in 1964-65 took one or more courses for graduate credit in the School 
of Agriculture during the school vear 1964-65 trail? 



Teacher Tra inin g Personnel Ch a nges Dr Eugene Wood is now assigned full time to agri- 
cultural education William Doerr, vocational agriculture teacher from Raymond, Illinois, 
was hired July 1, 1965 as Superintendent of University farms to relieve him of his farm 



responsibilities 



WJW 



Student Te aching Fal l Qu arter There will be 14 students doing student teaching this year 
and six the fall quarter, eight the winter quai'ter The following six student teachers will 
be out October 25 to December 17 



Scho ol 

Christopher 

Flora 

Joppa 

Trico 



Cooperating Teacher 

Leavell Swink 

G S Zimmerman 

Clarence Cox 

Ardell Kimmel 



Studen t Teacher 

Fred Sample 
Larry Henderson 
Brian Bremer 
Sam Jones 
James Davis 
Thomas Spreitler 



Home School 

Sesser 

Toledo 

Metropolis 

Marion 

Pinckneyville 

Sparta 

ESW 



AIDS, December 1965 






Re search an d Studies , Dr Ralph Benton completed a study of 'The Role of Non-Land Grant 
Colleges and Universities in Training Vocational Agriculture Teachers." A second study 
underway is titled, 'An Analysis of the Extra-Curricular Activities of Selected University 
Graduates and Their Relation to Measurements of the Leadership Function." 

Dr Benton had the following articles published, 1964-65; 

(a) 'Relation of Selected High School Subjects and Other Factors to Scholastic Achievement 
of Students in the School of Agriculture at Southern Illinois University. " The Journal 
of the National Association of Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture. Vol VIII, No 3, 
September 1964 

(b) "Rank in High School Class Predicts College Success at Southern Illinois University." 
Agricultural Education Magazine, Vol 37, No 4, October 1964. 

(c) 'High School Rank Is Important to College Success," Agriculture at Southern, School 
of Agriculture, September -October 1964 

(d) "Success in College," Rhodes School Faculty Bulletin, Vol IX, No 12, November 30, 
1964 



>\ 



"Rank in High School Most Important Factor," Southern Illinois School. Vol XXX, No 6 , 
February 15, 1965, 

Dr Eugene Wood supervised three l'esearch studies in Agricultural Education as require- 
ments for the Master of Science Degree: 

(a) 'What Can the Century Vocational Agricultural Department Contribute to Total Instruc- 
tion to Meet the Needs of the People of North Pulaski County," Russell J Inman 

(b) "A Study of the Adult Education Program in Vocational Agriculture in the Tamora High 
School," Richard D. Sutton 

(c) 'Ten Year Study of Former Students of Vocational Agriculture at the Metropolis Com- 
munity High School, in Metropolis, Illinois 1955-1964." Milton A Renaud. 

Dr Wood is now serving as a.dviser for two vocational agriculture teachers who should com- 
plete their research studies and qualify for a Master of Science Degree during 1965-66 

WJW 



AIDS, December 1965 -2- 




IAVAT 



NEW< 



ILLINOIS ASSN. OF VO-AG TEACHERS 



News from sectional Public Relations Officers from Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, should 
reach the editor by December 12 for the next issue 



+ + ■ * + * -+ 



There are a number of men eligible for the 10, 20, 25. 30. 35 year awards I must 
have their names immediately Please notify me as to the award you should receive by mail 
The only way we can have an award for you is to receive this information 

Joe Berger, at last report, stated there were eleven vo-ag instructors and two post- 
high instructors who had not yet paid dues 

Many of the delinquents have probably paid dues by now, since Berger wrote all sec- 
tional chairmen, urging them to make another effort to collect from members reported as 
delinquent 

Sections that were not 100% at the time of Mr Berger's report are Sections 1, 2, 
4, 6, 17. is, 19, 20, 23 All other sections have reported 100% membership 

* • . ■ 

Mr George Irvine reports a very interesting vo-ag session at the Illinois Valley 
Division of the IE A 

Mr. Joe Newcomer, County Superintendent of Schools in Bureau County (a former 
vo-ag teacher) served as chairman Mr George Richter, State Supervisor, explained the 
new Senate Bill 490 "Protective Eye Covering " 

Vernon Luther, Neponset, gave some interesting ideas and experiences he had with 
Group Chapter Projects Bill Lane. Ohio, took the pro side of the topic "E. F A Fairs 
and Contests" and Dale Baxter, Walnut, the con side 

George Irvine is beginning to think of next year's ag teachers conference. He 
states that tea.chers should urge their wives to attend conference and take in the meetings 
being planned for wives 

The wives have been organized for several years An interesting program is being 
planned for them at Urbana next June 

George says your wife might like to go to Danville, too I don't know exactly what 
he means 



**-+:+** 



AIDS, December 1965 



Speaking of wives, the following poem might be dedicated to them: Be sure they read it 

UNSUNG HEROES 
(so the wives may know we know) 

When it comes to needed people 
Who are truly out to serve, 
Who alone can hold the candle 
For endurance, strength and nerve 
Who can blend that grit and gumption 
Which meets justice on the spot, 
And breathe harmony on turmoil 
Soothing husband, youth and tot, 
There's but one we dare to mention 
For this "Roster of the Great " 
There's but one whose selfless service 
Long has smothered all debate, 
There's but one uncanny insight 
To cut red tape like a knife, 
it's that sweetheart, slave and master 
It's the Vo-Ag teacher's wife 

A. J Paulus (retired) 
University of Tennessee 

Mr Clyde Fry, Clinton, is our nominee from Illinois for the A. O Smith Harve store 
Travel Scholarship We congratulate Clyde and wish him luck in his further competition 

There was a lot of confusion concerning this award in its first year I received a letter 
from our executive secretary setting November 3rd as the deadline Later I received a letter 
from our national president setting November 10th as the deadline Then 1 received a letter 
from our regional vice-president urging that I send our nomination directly to A O Smith 
Han estore so they would get it no later than November 8th if we wished consideration 

Maybe there will be better understanding next year if the activity is repeated 

I would like to see more in the way of suggestions for filling out the blanks There was 
too much variation in the interpretation by teachers I hope there is some consideration given 
to this if A O Smith continues this fine program 

* * * + * t 

Your editor would like news, letters of suggestions, letters to get something 'off your 
chest, "news items from old issues of the AIDS, the 'Fan Mill, "or what have you Just any- 
thing to fatten up an issue 

As you receive this issue some of us will be on our way to Miami to attend sessions 
of the AVA and NVATA Conventions Presently it looks like your delegates will be John Baker, 
vice-president; Joe Berger, secretary -treasurer; James Guilinger and your president, yours 
truly. We hope more members will be there and that we can pick them up as voting delegates 
We will have reports of the convention for you in a later issue of the AIDS and also a report 
at the state convention 

AIDS, December 1965 -2- 



Your president was in Chicago November 17 as a guest of the Illinois Agricultural 
Association, He attended the president's reception in the Louis XIV Room of the Sherman 
House followed by dinner and a general session The Honorable Douglas MacArthur II was 
speaker at the general session 

+ . >f- -T * ^t T 

SECTION 22 NEWS: 

Mr and Mrs Wm Beldon have a baby boy named Douglas Dale Bill teaches , at 
Red Bud 

The Dick Petrowich's have a new arrival as of November 10th 8 lb 4 oz 
Jeffrey Benjamin, their second son Dick teaches at New Athens 

Section 22 will try something different this year In the parliamentary procedure 
contest the chairman and secretary will not participate in discussions We would like to 
know how other sections meet the problem of 14 schools or more in a contest 

Dick Petrowich 
Section 22 Reporter 

SECTION 23 MEWS: 

Here are a few choice tidbits from section 23 

Section 23 's Fall Meeting was held at the Red Hills State Park as the second annual 
'BREAKFAST MEETING " This lias many signs of becoming an annual event 

The Sectional FFA Sponsoring Committee was honored as guests of sectional teach- 
ers at a 'kickoff drive" banquet Plans for the year's promotion activities were made 

Cisne High School has a new class (not agriculture, but taught by Merle Holt the ag. 
teacher) in Occupational Skills for the school's under-achievers 

Section 23's politicians have been busy and have reaped rich rewards Mr Jesse 
Keyser is president-elect of South East Division of IE A and Mr Grover Burkett of 
Louisville is the new president of the Clay Countj' Education Association 

Rosebuds are in order for the Bill Washburns of Olney with the birth of a new baby 
girl This makes a pair for Bill and Barbara 

B L Whittington 

Section 23 

Public Relations Officer 

MEET YOUR DIRECTORS-- 

JOHN SWEENEY — DIRECTOR, DISTRICT III 

John Sweeney was born on a livestock and grain farm near Lexington, Illinois in 
McLean County Upon graduation from high school he farmed the home farm for about 
two yea/rs During the Korean Conflict he was called into military service as member of 
the 44th Infantry Division, Illinois National Guard He obtained a commission while on 
active duty John is still a member of the Illinois Guard with rank of Captain 

Upon returning from military service he began his college education at I S U 
After two years at I S U he transferred to the University of Illinois and graduated as a 
qualified agriculture instructor in June 1957. He received his master's degree from the 

AIDS, December 1965 -3- 



same institution in 1961 and has completed one-half his work on an Advanced Certificate 

In July 1957 he began teaching at Willi amsville High School He has seen his depart- 
ment strengthen and grow in his nine years He is anxiously awaiting to move into his new 
classroom and shop 

In 1960 he married Evelyn Patterson of Springfield and they have two boys, Troy and 
David John and his family are members of St John Vianney Church at Sherman 

Besides belonging to the education associations, John is a member of the National 
Guard Association and Knights of Columbus 

John gives much of his time to assisting Vocational Agriculture and FFA in Illinois 
He served three years as section chairman in section 14 For the past eight years he has 
helped in the Junior Division of the Illinois State Fair 

t ;■ * t t 

SECTION 21 NEWS- 

Our new chairman of section 21 is Jerald Binkley of Kinmundy He is aided very 
effectively by our secretary, Lawrence Jones of Odin 

We welcome two new teachers to section 21: C. T Hensen of Bluford and Maurice 
Watkins of Brownstoun 

Our Land Use Contest was held at Ramsey with Carl Kelley the host Congratulations 
to Richard Lowe for winning first place and also placing four of his boys in the top ten indi- 
viduals 

We are starting an FFA sectional newsletter this year At each monthly ag teachers 
meeting, each member will bring news of his chapter, and pass this out to the other teachers 
We believe the "For sale" and "Wanted" sections will be very popular 

Most teachers report increasing enrollments in agriculture this year 

Neil Jolliff 

Section 21 

Public Relations Officer 

SECTION 24 NEWS: 

We have two new teachers in our section this year; Gerald Weiss, Taraaroa and 
Darrell Dillow , Dongola 

Louis Templeton, Pinckneyville, has had more than his share of tragedy this year 
First he lost his father last spring, then a sister in September and his mother in November 
He is also hospitalized himself after suffering from a heart attack William Payne of Benton 
(U of I graduate) who was recently discharged from the service is filling in for Louis at the 
present time Our deepest sympathy goes to Louis and his family 

Ardell Kimmel 

Section 24 

Public Relations Officer 

sf f *■ +" ^ *■ 



AIDS, December 1965 

-4- 



HERE AND THERE WITH THE FFA — 

We are proud of the performance of Illinois teams in national contests The Chenoa 
FFA dairy judging team won first place at Waterloo, Team members are Randy Francis, 
Warren Johnson and Ronald Ackerman Their instructor is Mr Arthur Johnson The dairy 
products team from Shelbyville, coached by Mr Kenneth Diehl, received a silver emblem 

At Kansas City the livestock judging team from Galesburg received a gold emblem; 
the meats team from Shelbyville received a silver emblem; the poultry judging team from 
Sterling received a silver emblem 

Rick Clapp of the Newman Chapter was the official organist for the National Convention 
at Kansas City . 

Don Coil reports that eleven Illinois FFA boys attended the National Safety Congress 
as delegates Don reports they were representatives of the highest quality 

Don reports that Gary Organ, Illinois FFA president, was on a panel with FFA presi- 
dents from Iowa and Wisconsin at the Annual Meeting of Farm Services in Peoria on Novembei 
They discussed the general likenesses of their states as well as goals and ambitions It was 
a very impressive meeting, according to Don 

EDITORS NOTE : 

This is a copy of a letter I received from Ardell Kimmel I would like comments from 
teachers concerning organized effort by the IAVAT in the matter 

"We have our problems obtaining sanctions for our sectional events this year, the 
same as the rest of the other sections have encountered So I would like to get on my 'soap 
box' at this time and give some of my opinions on the subject. First I would like to quote 
from a letter our school received from Mr S. E Alkire, Asst Exec Secy, of the Illinois 
High School Association concerning the sanctioning of the Section 24 Grain and Poultry show 
'The Board of Directors of the Illinois High School Association has instructed us to not 
approve activities of the type listed on your sanction blank if they are held during school 
hours when student and teachers would be required to miss their regular classes ' 

"This statement seems to place the decision of not approving the events upon the 
board of directors composed of the following persons, Harry Fitzhugh, president. Franklin; 
Robert Grant, vice-president, Watseka; Carl Nation, secretary. McLeansboro. Wallace 
Fristoe, Morgan Park H S , Chicago; James Lewis, Argo, Forrest Tabor, Rock Falls 
and Lynn Gibbs, treasurer, Rantoul. I am wondering if some public relations work on the 
part of our profession in explaining the educational nature of these events would be bene- 
ficial in a better understanding between our organization and theirs It would also help to 
'clear the air' in receiving their explanation of why students are allowed to be dismissed 
during school hours for baseball games, track meets, the State Basketball Tournament, 
etc I believe a committee of agr teachers in the sections where these board of directors 
reside could arrange a meeting with the director and discuss the situation. 

"Other groups we could consider in helping us to clarify the situation, could be the 
Illinois Agriculture Association, members of the Illinois FFA Foundation Committee (they 
sponsor the awards for many of these events), State Senators. Representatives, our own 
IAVAT officers and directors, along with many other organizations who would be interested 
in the matter 

AIDS, December 1965 -5- 



"My belief is that our silence would mean that we agree with their decision I believe 
it behooves us to at least let them know that we do not agree with their decision that only local 
classroom work is educational enough to be held during school hours 

"I'm sure our organization is capable of coping with the situation and it is the feeling of 
the teachers of Section Twenty Four that we should pursue some type of organized effort to let 
our feelings be known What is your reaction ? 

Ardell Kimmel 

Section 24 

Public Relations Director" 



AIDS, December 1965 -6- 



(tear sheet) 

TO: Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61803 

Please send the following items: 

Number Price* Amount Item 

Illinois Farm Record Book (Parts I and II) 

A Farm Record Problem - 1964 (for use with above book) 

Key to 1964 Farm Record Book Problem 

1965 National Electrical Code 

Slidefilm 433 - Planning and Preparing for Concrete 

Masonry Construction 
Slidefilm 434 - Laying Concrete Masonry Units 

Slidefilm 435 - Special Concrete Masonry Problems 

Slidefilm 37 0-65 - Inventory Your Resources (revised) 

Slidefilm 371-65 - Plan the Land-Use Program and 

Estimate Crop Production (revised) 
Slidefilm 792 - Identification of Weeds, Part H (color) 

Teacher's Guide to Flower Arrangement, 40 pp 

Tape Recording - Stepping Stones to Succsss in the 
College of Agriculture 

Tape Recording - Choosing a Career in Agronomy 

Tape Recording - Choosing a Career in Ornamental Horticulture 

Set of six soil samples of known soil-t^st value 

Programmed Instruction Series No 403 - Understanding Soils N 

(revised), package of 20 
Scrambled Book No 504 - Privileged and Unclassified Motions 

Corn Subject Matter Packet 

♦Prices dc not include postage 

f Price of tape recordings is $1 50 if you send in your own tape; or $3 50 if we furnish a 
new tape # ^ „, 

Name School 






_1 


00 
05 






,50 






85 





_1 


15 





_1 


.03 








_98 


-, 




99 






84 





1 


95_ 

35 




M 


50 




50t 





(3 


50 

~50_t 





(3 

(i 


50 
50_t 


. 


15 


00 





— 


20 




1 


10 




75 



Address 



Billing 



AIDS, December 1965 









(tear sheet) 


TO: 


Vocational Agriculture Service 




434 Mumford Hall 




Urbana, Illinois 61803 




Please send the following: 




Number Price* Amount Item 




3 c 25 Safety Glasses with Side Shields 


(per pair) 




1.40 Flexible plastic mask goggles 



(per pair) 



These items are not in stock, but have been ordered and 
will be delivered as soon as possible. 



*Prices do not include postage, 

* * * 



Name School_ 

Address 

Billing 



AIDS, December 1965 



INDEX TO ITEMS IN VO-AG SERVICE SECTION 

Page 

Ag Guest Day in Retrospect .3 

Coded Copies of Income Tax; Schedule F and Schedule D 1 

Corn Packets . 3 

Dairy Calf Sale . 5 

Illinois Farm Record Books . . 1 

Information on College Entrance . . . 5 

In-Service Courses Scheduled ... 1 

Labor and Management Earnings Sheets for Livestock and Crop Enterprises 1 

Miracle of Grass . . 4 

New Books . 6 

New Bulletins and Circulars 4 

New Slidefilms . 2 

1965 National Electrical Code . 2 

Operator's Manuals for Ford Tractors and Equipment . 3 

Privileged and Unclassified Motions ... .5 

Programmed Instruction Series No 4C3 Revised . 2 

Safety Glasses . . 2 

Science in Agriculture . . 3 & 4 

Soil Samples of Known Soil-Test Value 2 

Special Events . . . „ 5 

Special Note to Teachers 5 

Tapes on Careers in Agriculture . . 2 

Teachers Guide to Flower Arrangement . 2 



AIDS, December 1965 



PRICE LIST OF FEEDS- 

The feed prices for many of the feedstuffs used in vocational agriculture projects are listed 
below This list is meant to be used as a basis of values for all boys obtaining their feed at 
. Feed purchased should be recorded at prices paid 

Kin d of feed Nov 18 

Corn, shelled, bu 

Corn, ground shelled or ear corn, bu. 

Oats, bu. ... 

Oats, ground, bu ... 

Barley, (feed) bu 

Barley, ground or rolled, bu 

Grain sorghum, cwt . . . 

Grain sorghum, cracked, cwt ... 

Skim and buttermilk, cwt . 

Whole milk, Grade B, cwt. 

Corn silage, ton 

Sorghum silage, ton 

Haylage, ton . . 

Clover and mixed hay) .,, , , . . 

. tj. ,j, . All hay and straw prices 

Alfalfa ) f u i i t^- 

„. ,, ; are tor baled Figure 

Timothy ) , . # r , , 

nJ i i loose at $5 less per ton 

Oa<: or wheat straw ) ^ 



4 



repared in cooperation with the Department of Agricultural Economics 



2/ 

— Or convert to dry hay equivalent containing 90 percent dry matter 



1 


.02 


1 


12 




62 




72 




90 


1 


00 


1 


90 


2 


00 


1 


50 


3 


00 


9 


50 


8 
14 


50 / 

oo- 7 


22 


00 


23 


00 


20 


00 


17 


00 



AIDS, December 1965 



VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE SERVICE 

Unlvanlty of llllneii - Ca[\*g* ot AaricuHuta 

434 MUMFORD HALL • URBANA, ILLINOIS 



serial:; department sshl 

i ILL LIBRARY 



^Os U.\o 



ra. 



1 






VO-AG AIDS 



Volume 24, Number 6 
January 1966 






DEC 30 13 



iuiwd jolnHy by 

Vocational Agriculture Service, College of Agriculture 

and 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

in Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 



VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 



In-Service Courses Schedul ed The following courses have been requested and are tenta- 
tively scheduled Teachers in the sections involved will be notified directly but in most 
cases there is room for a few additional teachers from nearby sections who may be inter- 
ested If you are from outside the section and wish to attend, please notify Vocational Agri- 
culture Service at once We will then notify the host school so that they can plan on you and 
will send you last minute details 



Date < > - Place 

Januaiy 8 Small Engines Annawan 

January 15 Tractor Tune-Up Beason 

January 19 Electrical Controls Neoga 



Section 

3 
14 
20 



S tarting Time 

9 a m 
9 a m 

4 p m 



JWM 

Mat erials Handli ng and Gr ain Drying Worksho p This workshop, sponsored by the Depart- 
ment of Agricultural Engineering and the Illinois Farm Electrification Council, will be held 
January 25-27 at the Ramada Inn, 1501 S Neil, Champaign, Illinois A program and other 
information concerning registration may be obtained by writing to the University of Illinois, 
Workshop Supervisor, HGe Mini Hall, Champaign, Illinois •or-n 

Crop Varieties for Illinois. Through the thoughtful ness of Dr W D Scott, we are send- 
ing in the January Agricultural Releases a wall chart showing the crop varieties recom- 
mended for Illinois in 1966 This chart lists the varieties of small grains, legumes, and 
grasses that are currently recommended for the northern, central, and southern sections 
of Illinois Additional copies are not available, but you may write for a single copy if you 

do not receive Agricultural Releases 

t\ J_iL- 

Report of 196 5 Vegetable and Sma l l Fruit Va ri ety Trials This report summarizes the 
recommended varieties of tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, cucumbers, cabbage, straw- 
berries, and blueberries Single copies were included in the January Agricultural Releases 
and a few copies are available on request 

XV i_/C 



The "Science" in Plant and Soil Science 



January Agricultural Releases 

few copies remain, but it will not be rerun 



A single copy of this reprint was included in the 
It discusses some of the opportunities in Agronomy A 



RLC 



Illi nois Custom Spray School. The 18th Annual Illinois Custom Spray School will be held 
January 26-27 in the Mini Room, Illini Union, Urbana. All persons interested in agricul- 
tural chemicals are invited to attend. As in the past, copies of the summaries of presenta- 
tions will be included in the March issue of Agricultural Releases 



AIDS, January 1966 



-1- 



Extramural Course in Ornamental Horticulture Dr J B Gartner. Head of the Division of 
Ornamental Horticulture, will offer Horticulture E234- Xurserv Management starting second 
semester (1965-66). The first meeting will be February 10, 1966 (Thurs ) at the Rock Falls 
High School agriculture room starting at 6:30 P M Three hours of undergraduate credit will 
be given for satisfactory completion of the course Tiiis course is a study of the various prac- 
tices and methods of operating a commercial nursery for the production of ornamental woody 
plants used for landscaping.. 

The most suitable day, place, and hour for the class can be settled at the first meeting A 
total enrollment of 15 is necessary in order to continue the course 

RLC 

Farmer's Tax Guide The 1966 edition of this Guide is being included in the January Agri- 
cultural Releases We have a very few copies available that could be sent, on a single copy 
basis, to persons not receiving releases If you need quantity copies, we suggest you check 

with local Internal Revenue offices or with farm advisers 

Jnn 

Standards for Measures of Efficienc y The new edition is being included in the January Agri- 
cultural Releases The Standards were prepared to give teachers a means of comparison for 
student record results or those obtained by farmers in adult classes We carry this item in 

stock, and additional copies can be obtained at 5 cents each 

JHH 

Judging Milk. Sediment Discs, and Mi lke r Unit H eads has been revised to conform with the 
suite and national contests The major changes are: (1) amount of deductions tor criticisms 
of milker unit heads (page 6), and (2) the list of criticisms for milker unit heads (pag< 
and 8) A copy of the revised pamphlet is being included in the January Agricultural Releas 
Additional copies can be ordered from Vocational Agriculture Service for IOC per copy, plus 
postage. WRW 

C rop Seed Samples We have had several inquiries for samples of the crop seeds used for 
identification in the State Judging Contest We have suggested that the Agricultural Edu< 
lion Club at the University of Illinois take on a project of prepai - als containing 

samples of these 24 crop seeds for sale to schools, if there is sufficient in - to wari 
il II appears that sets of 24 numbered vials of seeds, with a key. can be furnished at a 
cost of $3 00 plus postage If you would like to purchase a set. please send in the tear sheet 
order before January 20 If enough orders are received by that time, the sets of samples will 
be made up and sent out as soon as possible twat 

Winter Short Course in Agriculture Starts January 31 Again in 1966. the Illinois FFA 
Foundation is offering ten $50 scholarships to FFA members who want to attend the annual 
Winter Short Course in agriculture at the University of Illinois Urbana 

This annual six weeks' course starts on January 31 and runs through March 11 Youi 
farmers who attend the short course may choose from among 22 different courses in agri- 
cultural economics, agricultural engineerin onomy, animal science dairy scie 
horticulture and veterinary medicine 

Cost of the short course will range fro a. $235 ipon the courses and hous 

accommodations the student chooses Prospective students should also check with their local 
banks about a possible $100 scholarship to attend short course Last year 40 Illinois banks 
and county federations granted 47 scholarships to selected students 

For further information about the short course, write to Warren Wessels. Short Course Super- 
visor. 104 Mumford Hall. College of Agriculture, Urbana. Illinois .,,.,,. umji 

AIDS. January 1966 -2- 



Extramural Courses in Agriculture . The following announcement was furnished by 
Dean Karl E Gardner relative to extramural courses in agriculture that are scheduled 
for the second semester, 1965-66: 

Agr. Econ. E302 Financing Agriculture - 3 sem hrs. , 3/4 or 1 unit 

University of Illinois at Chicago Circle, Mondays beginning February 7 
Instructor - Prof. J M. Holcomb 



Epiphythology and Diagnosis of Plant Diseases - 3 hrs. or 3/4 unit 
Lyons Twp H.S. , Vaughn Bldg , 100 So Brainard, 
Mondays at 6:30 p m„ , beginning February 7 
Instructor - Assoc. Prof M, P. Britton 



Plant Path E306 
LaGrange 



Agr Econ. E332 Livestock Marketing - 3 hrs or 3/4 unit 

Pekin - Pekin H.S , 207 N 9th St , Room 71, Tuesdays at 6:30 p. m 

beginning February 8 
Instructor - Pi-of E E. Broadbent 



Plant Path E377 Diseases of Field Crops - 3 hrs. or 3/4 unit 

Pontiac - Pontiac H S . , Vo-Ag Room, Mondays at 6:30 p m. 
Instructor - Assoc Prof Malcom C Shurtleff 



beginning February 7 



Hort 



Agr 



E234 Nursery Management - 3 sem. hrs. 
Rock Falls - Rock Falls H.S. , Room 136, Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. , 

beginning February 10 
Instructor - Prof John B Gartner. 

Eng E381 Electro -Mechanical Agricultural Systems - 3 hrs or 3/4 unit 
Sparland - Sparland H S. , Vo-Ag Room, Thursdays at 6:30 p.m , 

beginning February 10 
Instructor - Assoc Prof Elwood F Olver 



Agron 



E303 Soil Fertility - 3 hrs or 1/2 unit 
Springfield - Springfield H.S. , 101 S Lewis St 
6:30 p m beginning February 11 
Instructor - Assoc Prof Lewis F Welch 



Room 11, Fridays at 



JWM 



Summer S chool Courses in Agriculture 
Dean C D. Smith: 



The following information was provided by 



The College of Agriculture will offer the following courses on a four-week basis from 
June 21 through July 15, 1966 which may be of interest to teachers of vocational agri- 
culture: 

Course and Title 



Agr. Econ. 332) 
An Sci. 332 ) 



Livestock Marketing- 



Rural Soc 477 - Rural Community 
Organization and Development 

Agronomy 303 - Soil Fertility 



An. Science 305 ) Genetics and Ani- 
Dairy Science 305) mal Improvement 



Credit 


Time 

10-12 MTWTF 

plus 2 hours to 


Instructor 


3 hrs. or 
3/4 unit 


E. E. Broadbent 




be arranged 




1 unit 


10-12 MTWT 


D E Lindstrom 


3 hrs or 


8-10 MTWTF 


L T. Kurtz 


3/4 unit 


plus 2 hrs to 
be arranged 




3 hrs or 
1/2 unit 


1-3 MTWT 


J C. DeFries and 
R. W. Touchberry 



In addition to these, special problems courses may be arranged in several departments.. 

JWM 
AIDS, January 1966 -3- 



Safety Glasse s,. Our order for 700 pairs of safety glasses and 300 pairs of plastic face shields 
has been accepted by the supplier and delivery to us has been promised for January 15, This 
should take care of all school orders that have been accumulated to date (December 20) and allow 
for a few extra. We will reorder as necessary and once the first order has been received, we 
will be able to judge the time required better than on this first order. We appreciate your 
patience and ask that you continue to bear with us until we can make delivery, twm 



NEW BOOKS 



The following have been added to our library since the last 
issue of the AIDS. All of our books are available for re- 
view in our office by those interested As long as the edi- 
tions are current, they will be included in such exhibits as 
the one at the Annual Conference of Vocational Agriculture 
Teachers 



MIDWEST FARM PLANNING MANUAL Sydney James, Editor 
University Press, Ames, Iowa 



1965 $3 50 Iowa State 



The following is quoted from information sent by the publisher: 

This concise guidebook places at the modern farmer's fingertips the data 
necessary for computing such things as: livestock feed requirements, farm 
labor requirements; outlays necessary for farm machinery, equipment and 
structures; the prices you should pay and receive for goods, costs and re- 
turns for crops and livestock; credit and insurance costs and taxes. 



AIDS, January 1966 



-4- 



}F=1 




AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION / COLLEGE OF EDUCATION / UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Votec 472 'Course Planning and Teaching Procedures" will be offered on campus the 
second semester this year. The course is scheduled for Tuesday evenings, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. 
in Room 33, Education Building The first session is February 8 

Teachers within 50 miles of the campus may wish to take advantage of this opportunity to 
start replanning their courses of study for next year and to consider adjustments in teach- 
ing procedures. 

Registration for commuting teachers is scheduled for February 5, 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon 
Bring proof of hospitalization insurance so that you will not be charged for university in- 
surance. 

AHK 

Placement Report As of December 17, 1965, there were five high school vocational agri- 
culture vacancies listed with our office. There are four men seeking positions at the end 

of the semester ,.tt^t- 

NDE 

New Staff Members The following men have been added as instructors in the Agricultural 
Education Division: 

Norman D, Ehresman was born in Mishawaka, Indiana and was reared near 
Lakeville, Indiana He attended Purdue University, where he received the 
B S and MS degrees in agricultural education He taught one year and 
then entered military service He was discharged from active duty in 1957 , 
but remains active in the Army Artillery Reserves Following his discharge 
he returned to teaching and taught vocational agriculture, chemistry, physics, 
biology and mathematics at Lakeville, Brighton, and Wakawsa, Indiana He 
is a member of Phi Delta Kappa, AVA and AATEA He has spent the past 
two years as a graduate assistant at the University of Illinois and is now a 
member of the full-time staff in agricultural education He is a candidate 
for the D Ed He is married and the father of two daughters 

Martin B M cMillion was born and reared in Greenbrier county of West 
Virginia He graduated from Renick High School in 1950 He attended 
Potomac State College for two years before entering West Virginia Uni- 
versity in 1952 While doing undergraduate work, he was a member of 
Alpha Zeta, Alpha Tau Alpha and three university judging teams In 1954, 
he received the B S degree in agricultural education and was employed as 
teacher of agriculture at Frankford High School in West Virginia He 
entered the US Army in 1955 and was discharged from the service with 
the rank of First Lieutenant in 1957 . After returning from the service he 
became a graduate assistant at Pennsylvania State University, earning a 



AIDS, January 1966 




iavat 



NEWS 



ILLINOIS ASSN. OF VO-AG TEACHERS 



George Irvine reports on the great game hunters in Section 7. He reports that 
Fred Morris, Mendota, has a German Police dog that is the best retriever in the country. 
The dog points pheasants, jumps the highest fences and retrieves on the run. The dog 
will return all birds retrieved to Fred, whether he shoots them or not. 

Jim Kuntz, Serena, is another of the great Section 7 hunters One weekend in 
Wisconsin he bagged a six -point deer On the way home he got a ten-point deer in his 
car radiator. Nice hunting, Jim! 

# * ;(s # # # 

I must have a list of the 10, 20, 25 and 30-year men if we are to recognize them 
at our conference. As of now, only three men have reported They are Bain, Saybrook; 
Finley, Benton; and Weger, Mulberry Grove. Please send your name, location and years 
of service to Melvin J Nicol, Maroa, immediately. 

The rVA Convention will be held March 10-12 at the Sherman House, Chicago. 
John Baker, IAVAT vice-president, will be in charge of the program for ag teachers 
You can be certain he will have a good program for us Why not plan to attend' 

The Illinois Agricultural Association honored the following members of our 
association for 25 years of service in the field of Agricultural Education at their recent 
annual meeting in Chicago: Orville Bottrell, Crete; E A Crump, Potomac; Max Kuster, 
Joliet; Fred Morris, Mendota; Robert Rohlfing, Paxton; Robert Van Rheeden, New Lenox; 
F. A Schaper, Aledo; John E Shields, Jr. , Shannon; Glen Diamond, Carbondale; 
Eshol M. Gates, Mason City; Ralph A Guthrie, Springfield; Ernest Lamkey, Oakland, 
and Stanley Klaus, Carlinville These men represent a total of 325 years of dedicated 
service Congratulations from your fellow workers 

^ % * * *- ? 

Your Association was represented at the NVATA and AVA Convention in Miami 
by Jim Guilinger, Joe Berger and Mel Nicol Others at the convention from Illinois were 
Bob Howey, who was re-elected national secretary-treasurer; Drs~ Lloyd Phipps, 
Al Krebs, J. R Warmbrod, Gerald Fuller and Paul Hemp, of the University of Illinois 



AIDS, January 1966 



Agricultural Education Department; Dr, Kenneth James, Agricultural Education, IS U ; 
Drs J W Matthews and Roger Courson and Professor Harold Witt, Voc Agr. Service 
and J, E Hill and Ralph Guthrie, state office. 

Dr Elizabeth Simpson, Home Economics Education, University of Illinois was 
nominated for president of AVA You will want to give her your vote when the ballot comes 
by mail later this year. 

Dr Paul Hemp was the main speaker at the breakfast sponsored by Southern Coop- 
eratives . 

Dr. John Matthews was presented an honorary life membership award at the NVATA 
awards breakfast. He was one of two men from our region to be so honored. 

Dr Al Krebs was busy serving as president-elect of the Teacher Educator section 

Mr and Mrs Melvin Henderson were in Florida and attended some of the sessions 

Jim Guilinger won a handsome attache case in the Exchange of Ideas contest at the 
convention Jim will have a detailed report of the convention in this issue of the AIDS 

Herbert M. Kobler, Marion vo. ag teacher writes "I am writing in reference to 
Mr Ardell Kimmel's letter to you concerning sanctions, published in the AIDS The agri- 
culture teachers I have talked with are ready for action on this subject. I suppose we are 
waiting for someone to point the way. If our association does not take action on this issue, 
we are failures To me this is the most direct insult thrown our way in a long time Let's 
have some action' " 

Your editor appreciates such letters Let's have a lot more opinions on this If 
there are many of you with the same thoughts I am sure we can take some action as an 
association before another year rolls around 

Gleanings from Section 14 -- 

Tom Wiles, Glenwood, is Superintendent of the Glenarm Methodist Sunday School. 
He is presently enrolled in Vo Tech 474 He spent last summer at Army Reserve Camp 
and summer school 

Dale Barthel, Rochester, has a daughter enrolled at S I U . He belongs to the 
Rochester Lions Club and was hospitalized for an operation last summer, 

Lee West, Mt Pulaski, is presently enrolled in Vo Tech 474. He is starting 
study for an advanced certificate He took a 3§ weeks camping trip to the west coast last 
summer 

Mr and Mrs Henry Gartner, Buffalo, announce the arrival of a new son. Henry 
attended the U of I last summer- He is presently enrolled in Vo. Tech 474 

Bob Polley, Hartsbui-g, says "Enco puts the tiger in your tank, while Standard filters 
out the hairs " Bob is advisor of the past state FFA secretary -treasurer , Robert Jeckel 
He has turned out 19 State Farmers and one American Farmer at Hartsburg He is an 
Elder of the Christian church, a Sunday School Teacher and President of the Church Board 

Donald Miller, New Holland-Middletown, was honored by having the school yearbook 
dedicated to him. 

AIDS, January 1966 -2- 



Alvin Brock, Ashland, reports that their chapter is conducting Farm Safety pro- 
grams in auto safety, corn picker safety and general safety Alvin enjoys riding horses 

Harold Elliott, Atlanta, worked on his advanced certificate last summer 

Max Muirhead, Illiopolis, is a beginning teacher He was also married last summei 

Winners in Section 14 contests are as follows: Land Use, Glenwood; Beef Judging, 
Beason; Swine Judging, New Holland; Parliamentary Procedure, Beason 

The grain show had over 200 entries from 18 schools The show featured a shelling 
percentage contest with ear corn 

Lee West 

Public Relations Officer 

Section 14 

Your editor would like news from Public Relations officers from Sections 6, 7, 8, 
9, 10 for the February issue Please get news to Melvin Nicol, Maroa, by Jan 12 News 
from any Sectional Reporter will be welcome at any date 

Did you know that — 

Indiana has ten new departments of vocational agriculture operating this year 

Indiana initiated their first exchange of ideas contest at the state conference last 
year 

The Michigan association has a teacher recruitment committee. 

The Missouri Association is the only 100% membership association in our region 

Seven members of the Kentucky Association attended the A I C conference at 
Columbia, Missouri last summer 

Illinois has more than twice as many news letters annually than most of the state 
associations 

The Illinois Voc Agr Service is still the envy of most associations 



SECTION 4 NEWS: 

New teachers in the section are Ralph D. Gullett, Yates City; Bill Schreck, 
Warren High School, Monmouth; and John Rundle, Yorkwood High School, Little York 

Officers are Don Coordes of Roseville and newly elected Tom Knox at Alexis 
Don is the Section Chairman and Tom is the Section Secretary 

Our Sectional FFA Parliamentary Procedure Contest was held in the fall this year- 
an innovation for our section We had the largest number of chapters participating in many 
years The contest was won by Aledo under the expert guidance of Fred Schaper 

We assume Harold Huber is happy with his new job in the Agricultural Mechanics 
course at Canton Junior College This is one of the new post high school programs de- 
veloped this past year Harold formerly taught at Yorkwood 

Jim Guilinger 

Public Relations Officer 

Section 4 
AIDS, January 1966 ****** 



NVATA CONVENTION 

Miami Beach, Florida 

Carillon Hotel 

December 2 - December 10, 1965 

M J Nicol, Maroa, Joe Berger, Charleston, President and Secretary of the IAVAT 
and Jim Guilinger, Williamsfield, were the official delegates at the past 17th National Voca- 
tional Agricultural Teachers Association held in the Carillon Hotel, Miami Beach, Florida, 
December 2 - December 10, 1965 

The three of us traveled by jet from Chicago's O'Hare Field to Miami International 
arriving at 1:30 AM Saturday morning, December 4, 1965, with NVATA sessions starting 
at 10:00 AM that morning 

The following is a brief summary of the activities and functions attended either indi- 
vidually or by the group during the week : 



Saturday - December 4, 1965 



Morning Session 
Afternoon Sessions 



Evening Session 

Sunday, December 5, 1965 
Morning Session 



Afternoon Sessions 



NVATA General Session 
i. 

NVATA Special Program with M.J Nicol giving the 

invocation for the afternoon session 

Region 4 meetings with Gerald Page, NVATA Vice 

President 

State Pi*esidents reception which the entire group 

attended, courtesy of A O Smith Harvestore 

Products, Inc. 

NVATA State Presidents dinner, courtesy of Swift 
& Co attended by M J Nicol and Joe Berger 



NVATA breakfast sponsored by A O Smith Harvestore 
Products, Inc 

The three of us attended church services at a nearby 
Presbyterian Church 

NVATA Second General Session and group meetings 

entitled Guidelines for Growth 

Joe participated in Group 1, Cooperation in Agricultural 

Education 

Jim participated in Group 5, Cooperating with Agri- 

Business and Industry 

Mel participated in Group 6, Serving the Membership 

The three of us attended the NVATA Reception in the 

Carillon Hotel where we met all those responsible for 

the arrangements of the NVATA Convention 



Monday, Dece mber 6, 1965 
Morning Session 



NVATA Second Regional Meeting with Gerald Page, Vice 
President Each state presented a report on its activities 
during the past year 



AIDS, January 1966 



-4- 



Afternoon Session - The three of us participated in a tour of the Miami school 

farm This farm consists of some 80 acres located in the 
metropolitan area of Miami There are 175 students and 
four instructors Major emphasis is placed in landscape 
gardening, poultry, beef and vegetable production. A more 
detailed report will be made at the June conference. 

Evening Session - Free time - the first in many an hour 

Tuesday, December 7 , 1965 

Breakfast meeting - Sponsored by Councils of Farmer Cooperatives of Florida, 

Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina 

Morning Session - The three of us divided and attended three separate AVA 

General Meetings listed below 

Joe participated in meetings on Challenges to Guidance and 
Vocational Education. 

Jim participated in Manpower Needs of the Future and the 
Role of Vocational-Technical Education and the Business- 
Industry Community in Meeting the Needs 
Mel participated in Research Studies in Progress concern- 
ing Vocational-Technical Education, 

Afternoon Sessions- Each of us participated in a related topic concerning Voca- 
tional-Technical Education conducted by the AVA, 

Evening Session - American Vocational Association 1st General Session The 

major speaker for this session was Dr Werner von Braun, 
Director, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 
George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 
Dr. von Braun 's speech was extremely interesting and inform 
ing concerning our manned space flights being conducted at 
present as well as the proposed Apollo moon flights. 

Wednesday, December 8, 1965 

Breakfast meeting- NVATA Awards Breakfast, courtesy of Allis-Chalmers 

Manufacturing Company. Dr. John Matthews. University 

of Illinois Vo-Ag Service was presented an NVATA life 

membership 

J. W Guiiinger won the Region 4 Exchange of Ideas Contest 

and was presented an attache case, courtesy of NVATA 

Morning Session - NVATA final General Session - Reports by the Regional 

Vice President and the voting on proposed NVATA Reso- 
lutions which were presented to the AVA Board Election 
of new NVATA. Officers was also held and they are as 
follows: 

President - Jim Durkee, Laramie, Wyoming 
Treasurer - Robert Howey, Sycamore, Illinois 
Region IV Vice President - Gerald Page, Nixa, Mo 
Mr Page was elected last year at the Minneapolis 
Convention and holds his position for a period of 
three vears 



AIDS, January 1966 



Luncheon 



Afternoon Session 



Evening Session 



Region IV had thirty -six delegates attending from six 
states Unfortunately Illinois had only three out of a 
permissible eleven. 

Luncheon for all Agricultural Education groups, 
courtesy of International Harvester Company 

This period of time was set aside for the NVATA mem- 
bers to visit 120 commercial and industrial exhibits in 
the Deauville HoteL 

Second AVA General Session Major speaker was 

Hon Phillip M Landrum, Representative from Georgia. 

U S 



Congress 



Thursday, December 9, 1965 
Morning Session 



Afternoon Session 



Evening Session 



Combined meeting of Ag Education groups Major speaker 
was Neville Hunsicker, United States Office of Education, 
Washington, D C 

Our second free time so we boarded a tour bus to get a 
better understanding of Miami and Dade County area. 

American Vocational Association Annual Banquet honor- 
ing Dr. M D Mobley, Retiring Executive Secretary of 
the American Vocational Association Dr Mobley started 
as a Vo-Ag Instructor in Georgia in the 1920s 



Fri day, December 10, 1965 
Morning Session 



Combined Agricultural Education Groups 
M. D Mobley,. 



Major speaker 



Afternoon Session 



Evening 



General Thoughts 
teachers: 



AVA House of Delegates Our group participated with all 
of the other vocational groups in the voting on sixteen 
resolutions Since next year is Home Economics turn to 
have the AVA President all Illinoisans are asked to support 
Miss Elizabeth J Simpson, University of Illinois, for the 
office of the AVA President. 

Returned by jet to Chicago's O'Hare Field where we went 
our separate ways toward home 

Following are some thoughts from the NVATA Convention for Illinois Ag 



-Ag 



1, Public relations by Ag teachers has decreased greatly At one time Vo- 

personnel did a much better job of getting our programs understood by people 
in business and industry as well as our local community Quote from Dr M D 
Mobley, AVA "Agriculture teachers are doing a rotten job in public relations," 

2 There will be a dire need for trained agricultural personnel in the immediate 
future. It is estimated we will need about 1500 ag teachers next year nationally; 
2250 three years from now We graduated 700 plus in 1964 to fill some 1500 jobs 
available We, as Ag teachers, need to sell our program to our own students, 
particularly in the area of job opportunities 



AIDS, January 1966 



3, We should and must expand our present vocational agriculture program for all 
students, but still retain the heart on which we have built our past program 
Dr. Hunsicker feels if we do not accomplish this, then other agencies, both polit- 
ical and private, will take it away from us, 

4v We, as vo-ag persons, must become more professional than we are at present. 
We have been privileged in the past to be the leaders in vocational education, but 
unless we strive harder to accomplish the goals ahead of us, we will be passed by 
other segments of the educational field. Returning to Item 1, we must not only be 
good teachers of agriculture, but we must sell our program to all persons in the 
community in which we live. To quote past NVATA President Luther Hardin of 
Arkansas, "Most of us are winking at the pretty girl across the room in the dark; 
we know what we are doing but she doesn't, " Turn on the lights with information 
about what is taking place. 

Next year's NVATA Convention will be held in Denver, Colorado, December 2-9, 1966 Let's 
have the Illinois Vocational Ag Teachers represented at this convention. 

Jim Guilinger 



AIDS, January 1966 



(tear sheet) 



TO: Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61803 



Please send the following items: 

Number Price* Amount Item 



5£ Standards for Measures of Efficiency, 1965 

10£ Judging Milk Sediment Discs, and Milker Unit Heads, Revised 



* Prices do not include postage. 

Name School 



Address 











Billing 






COMPOSITE ORDER 
Number Price* Amount 
$3 00 


Item 

Set of 24 samples of crop seeds used in 
State Crops Judging Contest 

tage 

in your order before January 20, 1966 if ; 
Information on delivery date will be given 
DS 

School 




*Price does not include pos 

NOTE: Please send 
interested 
February A] 

Name 

Address 


/c-u are 
in 




AIDS, January 1966 









INDEX TO ITEMS IN VO-AG SERVICE SECTION 

Page 

Crop Seed Samples ............................. 2 

Crop Varieties for Illinois ........................ 1 

Extramural Course in Ornamental Horticulture . . . . ......... 2 

Extramural Courses in Agriculture 3 

Farmer's Tax Guide , , . 2 

Illinois Custom Spray School .............. 1 

In-Service Courses Scheduled ..... 1 

Judging Milk, Sediment Discs, and Milker Unit Heads ....... . 2 

Materials Handling and Grain Drying Workshop . ...... ....... 1 

New Books « . 4 

Report of 1965 Vegetable and Small Fruit Variety Trials 1 

Safety Glasses 4 

Standards for Measures of Efficiency . . ...... 2 

Summer School Courses in Agriculture 3 

The "Science" in Plant and Soil Science . . 1 

Winter Short Course in Agriculture 2 



AIDS, January 1966 



PRICE LIST OF FEEDS- 

The feed prices for many of the feedstuffs used in vocational agriculture projects are listed 
below. This list is meant to be used as a basis of values for all boys obtaining their feed at 
home. Feed purchased should be recorded at prices paid. 

Kind of feed Dec. 10 

Corn, shelled, bu ................$ 1. 12 

Corn, ground shelled or ear corn, bu, 1.22 

Oats, bu. ................... .66 

Oats, ground, bu. .76 

Barley, (feed) bu. .90 

Barley \ ground or rolled, bu. ....................... . 1.00 

Grain sorghum, cwt. 1.90 

Grain sorghum, cracked, cwt. ........... ............. 2.00 

Skim and buttermilk, cwt. ................. ....... 1.50 

Whole milk, Grade B, cwt. 3.00 

Corn silage, ton .............................. 9.50 

Sorghum silage, ton 8.50 

Haylage, ton . . 14.00— 

Clover and mixed hay) ....... .................. 22.00 

Alfalfa ) All hay and straw prices 24.00 

Timothy ) are for baled. Figure ............... 21.00 

Oat or wheat straw ) loose at $5 less per ton ............... 18.00 



— Prepared in cooperation with the Department of Agricultural Economics 
2/ 

— Or convert to dry hay equivalent containing 90 percent dry matter. 



AIDS, January 1966 



2/ 



1HSS 






sionhii 'VNvajjn • iivh aaojwnw *c* 
33IAV1S sannrDiaov ivnoijlvdoa 






VO-AG AIDS 



-5 



Volume 24, Number 7 
Februarj' 1966 



Issued jointly by 
Vocational Agriculture Service, Collego of Agriculture 

and 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

in Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 



VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 



In-Service Courses Scheduled. Only one in-service course is presently scheduled definitely 
although others have been requested and we are in the process of setting dates to be announced 
later. 



Date 
March 26 



Course 
Surveying 



Place 
Wenona 



Section 



S tarting Tim e 
9 am. 



Teachers in this section will be notified directly , If you are outside the section and would 
like to attend, please notify Vocational Agriculture Service 



RFE 



Safety Glasses . Our first order of 7 00 pairs of safety glasses with side shields and 300 pairs 
of plastic face masks has been received, All orders we have received from schools to date 
(January 21) have been filled except two, and these have received partial shipment In the 
final negotiation we were able to reduce the prices originally quoted somewhat so that the 
safety glasses are $3.00 per pair and the plastic masks $1.25, plus postage. We placed a 
second large order which we hope will be in by the time you read this These items are re- 
peated on the tear sheet in this issue of the AIDS in case you wish to order 

JWM 

FFA Roadside Signs Sets of FFA roadside slogan signs are now ready for the schools listed 
below. They may be picked up at our shop and storage building any day, Monday through Sat- 
urday, 8:00 to 5:00, or we will send them to you if you specifically authorize us to do so. The 
new signs are aluminum and the estimated cost of shipping is $1 61 per set to schools in the 
first or second zone It is $1. 91 for the third zone Names of the schools in the third zone 
are starred below You may use the tear sheet to notify us if you want your signs shipped 



Aledo 

Annawan 

Atwood 

Beason 
•"Benton 
*Carbondale Comm. 

Cerro Gordo 

Cullom 

DeKalb 

Dwight 

Edwardsville 

Erie 

Fisher 

Freeport 

Gibson City 

Havana 

Jamaica 



Lawrenceville 

Lincoln-Way 

Macon 

Malta 

Manteno 

Mazon 

McLeansboro 

Metamora 
*Metropolis 
*Murphysboro 

Nauvoo -Colusa 

Newton 

Northwestern 

Odin 

Olney 

Pinckneyville 

Princeville 



Rankin 

Robinson 

St Elmo 

Somonauk 

Southwestern 

Sparland 

Spoon River Valley 
*Thompsonville 

Toulon 
*Trico (Campbell Hill) 

Unity 
Wapella 

Wenona 

Wesclin 

Williamsfield 

Yorkwood 



JWM 



AIDS, February 1966 



-1- 



Crop Seed Sample s, As announced in January AIDS, samples of the 24 crop seeds used for 
identification in the State Judging Contest will be made available by the Agricultural Educa- 
tion Club at the University of Illinois. A total of 55 orders have been received to date so the 
club has decided to make up 100 sets this year Remaining sets will be assigned on a first- 
come, first-served basis. The cost of a set is $3,00 plus postage and the item is repeated 
on the tear sheet in this issue of the AIDS. Delivery will be made as soon as the sets can be 
made up 

JWM 

Extramural Courses in Agriculture The following courses are listed for extramural offer- 
ing during the second semester, 1965-66: 

Agr, Econ E302 Financing Agriculture - 3/4 unit 

University of Illinois at Chicago Circle - Taft Hall. Room 312 
Mondays at 6:30 p. m , beginning February 7 
Instructor -J. M Holcomb 

Plant Path. E306. Epiphytology and Diagnosis of Plant Diseases - 3/4 unit 

LaGrange - Lyons Twp. H. S. , Vaughn Bldg. , 100 S Brainard, Room 126 
Mondays at 6:30 p.m , beginning February 7 
Instructor -M P„ Britton 

Agr, Econ E332 Livestock Marketing - 3/4 unit 
Pekin - High School, Room 71 
Tuesdays at 6:30 p m .. , beginning February 8 
Instructor - E. E Broadbent 

Plant Path. E377 Diseases of Field Crops - 3/4 unit 
Pontiac - High School, Vo-Ag Room 
Mondays at 6:30 p.m. , beginning February 7 
Instructor - M C Shurtleff 

Hort E234 Nursery Management - 3 semester hours 
Rock Falls - High School, Room 136 
Thursdays at 6:30 p. m , beginning February 10 
Instructor - J , B Gartner 

Agr. Eng E381, Electro -Mechanical Agricultural Systems - 3/4 unit 
Sparland - High School, Vo-Ag Room 
Thursdays at 6:30 p m. , beginning February 10 
Instructor - E F. Olver 

Agron E303 Soil Fertility - 1/2 unit 

Springfield - High School, Room 11 

Fridays at 6:30 p m . beginning February 11 

The most suitable day and hour for the class can be settled at the first meeting indicated 
above. A total enrollment of 15 is necessary in order to continue the class Questions 
concerning these courses should be directed to J W Matthews, Chairman of Extramural 
Courses Committee, 434 Mumford Hall, Urbana 61801. 

JWM 

Rep rinting of Units Completed. We are glad to announce that all subject-matter units on 
our listing are again available with the exception of VAS 2009, Using the Illinois Farm 
Record Book This unit has been withdrawn since it deals with the old farm record book 
We appreciate your patience during recent months when we have had to back order a large 
number of units because of unusually large orders and increasing trouble with our old ofi 
set printer We have now replaced this machine with a new one and have finally caught up 
on reruns If you have an order for units that has not been completely filled, please let us 
know jwm 

AIDS, February 1966 -2- 



B ulletins and Circulars Two new circulars were received since the last issue of the AIDS. 
They are. Cir. 921, Illinois Fruit Calendar for Growers of Apples, Strawberries, Peaches; 
and Cir 923, Performance of Commercial Corn Hybrids in Illinois, 1963-65 Also, 1966 
editions of the following were issued: 

Cir 897 Insect Control for Commercial Vegetable Crops and Greenhouse 

Vegetables 
Cir, 898 Insect Control for Livestock and Livestock Barns 
Cir. 899 Insect Control for Field Crops 
Cir. 900 Insect Control for the Homeowner 
Cir. 907 Herbicide Guide for Commercial Vegetable Growers 

A copy of each of these publications was included in February Agricultural Releases Illinois 
teachers may order additional copies in the usual way The supply of Cir 923 is very limited 
and not available in quantity out-of-state Quantity prices on the others for out-of-state distri- 
bution is 10£ per copy for Cir 921 and 5£ per copy for each of the others 

JWM 

A gricu lt ure College Students The following information was supplied by Dean C D. Smith of 
the University of Illinois College of Agriculture: 

Cash Scholarshi ps Avai l able in Agricu lture 

Now is the time for high school seniors who are interested in studying agriculture at 
the University of Illinois to apply for cash scholarships Awards worth $300 per year to $1000 
for four years are available to students in the top quarter of their high school class who need 
financial assistance Applications may be obtained by writing to the Associate Dean, College 
of Agriculture, Urbana, Illinois 

Ap ply Now for Admission 

High school seniors who plan to enter the College of Agriculture, University of Illinois 
should file applications as soon as possible Rank in graduating class and ACT composite score 
are used to determine eligibility Students who rank in the upper half of their graduating class 
and have an ACT composite score of 20 or higher can probably qualify for admission in Septem- 
ber, 1966. Those with lower ACT composite scores who rank relatively high in their graduating 
class may also qualify if they apply by March 1, 1966 Housing assignments in University resi- 
dence halls will not be made until the student has been accepted for admission 

Ag Students Should Conside r Junior Coll eges 

Students interested in continuing their education in Agriculture, but for one reason or 
another cannot enter the College of Agriculture at Urbana, should consider entering a junior 
college for one or two years of study For most majors in Agriculture, two years of work may 
be taken in a junior college without loss of time or credit. Junior college students who earn a 
3.25 oi higher grade average (on a system where C = 3. 0) are eligible to transfer to the Col- 
lege of Agriculture at Urbana. 

CDS/JWM 

Scholarships in Agri cul tu ral Co mmunic ations 

Scholarships are being offered to Illinois students interested in studying agricultural 
communications at the University of Illinois 

These $300 scholarships are available to young men and women interested in pursuing 
agricultural communications careers: farm publication writing and editing- farm radio and 
television broadcasting, agricultural public relations, photography, and agricultural advertising. 

AIDS, Febiuary 1966 -3- 



According to Hadley Read, extension editor, the scholarships will be granted for the 
1966-67 school year beginning next September, and will be awarded on the basis of applica- 
tions The scholarships have been donated by members of the agricultural communications 
industry 

An applicant must reside in Illinois, rank in the upper one-third of his or her high 
school class, and enter the University of Illinois College of Agriculture next fall as a fresh- 
man or transfer student, with a major in agricultural communications 

Application forms are available by writing to: 

Agricultural Communications Scholarship Committee 
330 Mumford Hall 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 

Completed agricultural communications scholarship application forms must be sub- 
mitted by April 1 

HR/JWM 

Film Reports — Col or Slide Sets The following 35 mm. color slide sets were developed by 
the Extension Editors office. 

Using Pre-emergence Herbicides - 41 frames 

Control of Aquatic Weeds - 39 frames 
Seed Quality A Major Factor 

in Crop Yields - 35 frames 

Persons wanting to use these slide sets on loan should contact their local extension office or 
the Audio Visual Aids office at the University 

RLC 

1966 Veg e table Variety Recommen dations A single copy of this leaflet was included in the 
February Agricultural Releases Single copies are available to those who did not receive one 

RLC 

Sam ple Grain Rings for Judging Grain judging rings for corn, oats, soybeans, and wheat are 
again available These practice sets are all new and differ from those previously distributed 
Each ring consists of four 8 -ounce samples with official placings and reasons 

Each ring will sell for $2 00. or $7 50 for the complete set of four, plus postage from Urbana 
Charges can be placed against your open account These samples are prepared by the Agronomy 
Field and Furrow Club This item is included on the tear sheet for the convenience of those who 
may wish to order. 

RLC 

Soil Samples o f Known Soil -Test Value All orders for standard soil samples of known soil- 
test value have been filled and we have approximately 20 complete sets left Orders for these 
sets are available at $15. 00 per set of six samples, plus postage The range in soil test values 
is as follows: pH 4 5 - 7.7, Pi 5-30 lbs ; P 2 6-115 lbs. , K 68-300 lbs It is listed on the tear 
sheet 

RLC 



AIDS, February 1966 -4- 



Ta pes on Careers in Agri culture A tape recording on the post-secondary vocational pro- 
grams has been prepared at the five Junior Colleges offering training in agriculture. The 
following pix>grams were recorded: 

Canton Community College - Farm Machinery Technology 

Danville Junior College - Ornamental Horticulture 

Joiiet Junior College - Agricultural Supply 

Wabash Valley College - Agri-Business 

- Agricultural Mechanics 
Chicago City Junior College, 

Woodrow Wilson Branch - Ornamental Horticulture 

Information on each of these programs was combined into a single tape 30 minutes long, 
recorded at 7 i ips. The price of this tape is $1 .50 if you send your own tape, or $3, 50 if 
we furnish a new tape. These prices do not include shipping charges It is listed on the 
tear sheet with the other career tapes that were previously announced 

RLC 

New Color Slidefilms Practice sets of meat, pictures have been prepared in slidefilm form 
as a supplement to the films on Identi ficatio n of Meat Cuts. These are: 

182-65 Supp - Practice Set for Identification of Pork Cuts - $2.15 

183-65 Supp. - Practice Set for Identification of Beef Cuts - $2,25 

185-65 Supp, - Practice Set for Identification of Lamb and Variety Cuts - $2.04 

These are not being sent on advanced order but are available on request They are listed on 
the tear sheet, 

RLC 

Meal Judging and Grading The booklet "Meat Judging and Grading" has been revised to con- 
form with the new U S Dept of Agr. carcass grades and the state and national contests A 
more complete explanation of beef grading is included as well as a revised list of meat cuts 
for identification. If you are coaching a meat's team, be sure to look over the sample cards 
on page 29, A copy of the revised pamphlet is being included in the February Agricultural Re- 
leases Additional copies can be ordered from Vocational Agriculture Service for 25£ per 
copy, plus postage. WHW 

Illinois Spring Barro w Show The first Illinois Spring Barrow Show will be held at the fair- 
grounds in Springfield on February 19, 1966. There will be classes for 2 weights of single 
barrows, a carcass class, and a pickup load of 5 head. There will not be a separate class for 
junior exhibitors, but juniors are invited to compete in the open classes Premium lists can 
be secured at Farm Advisers offices or by writing to G R Carlisle, 326 Mumford Hall, Urbana 

GRC/WHW 

c J?^ n Ee^D^te^f^ud^in^_C_oin:est Due to a conflict here at the University, the date of the 
judging contest has been changed to June 23 Please make the change on your calendar to 
avoid misunderstanding The rules, with the revised date, will be reaching you about the 
first of April. 

WHW 

MMLMlMLUijl^hig^onjtest Saturday, April 2, is the date for the 1966 State Meat and Milk 
Judging Contest There will be a card in the March AIDS for you to return if you are planning 
to attend. This is not a definite registration but a means of determining the amount of milk 
samples, etc. , to prepare Please watch for the card and return it promptly if you are enter- 
ing teams.. 

AIDS, February 1966 -5- 



The contest will start promptly at 10:00 A M Samples of milk and milker unit heads, 
officially criticized for your examination, will be on exhibit in the Stock Pavilion after 9:30 a„m 

The only changes in this year's contest are on the milker -unit -he ad card.. Please 
note the changes in the sample shown in the back of "Judging Milk, Sediment Discs, and 
Milker Unit Heads. " This publication was included in the January Agricultural Releases. 

WHW 

Farm Ma nagement M anual, . By the middle of February, the Manual is to be rerun. We 

understand that some revisions will be made as compared with the previous edition The 

item will be included in the March Releases. If you have an urgent need before that time 

you can probably get copies by writing us about February 15 We expect the cost to be 

about 15<? per copy, We understand that the Income Possibilities form used with the Manual 

will remain the same. Copies are still available from this office at 30 each. 

JHH 

Revi sed Listings and Order Form s., The following revised order forms are being sent in 
February Releases: Slidefilms; Agricultural Mechanics Materials; Programmed Inst ruc- 
tion Materials ; Soils, Crops and Fertilizer Materials; and Miscellaneous Materials. They 
are being sent directly to the 17 Illinois schools that do not subscribe to Releases, We hope 
you will remove these forms from your Release packet, place them in your Order File, and 
discard all old forms of the same title If you do not receive sets of these new order forms 
or want additional copies, please let us know 

JWM 

Sheep She aring Schools. G. E Ricketts of the animal science extension staff has given us 
following information: 

Sheep shearing schools this year will be held as follows: March 17 and 18 at University of 
Illinois; March £9 and 30 at Lee County 4-H Center, Amboy; April 5 and 6 at Dixon Springs 
Agricultural Center, Simpson; and March 31 and April 1 in western Illinois 

We will try to limit the school to older high school boys that are large enough to handle 
mature sheep and have sheep projects and to out -of -school boys who own sheep flocks and 
will have a chance to shear sheep after the school Enrollment fee will be the usual $2„ 50 
per boy . $2 00 of which will be refunded to all boys who stay for the two days of the school. 
The enrollment fee check should be made payable to the Sheep Shearin g Fund . Since we al- 
ways have more enrollments than we are able to accept, we will take enrollments on a first - 
come first-served basis, but will not accept an enrollment unless the fee accompanies the 
letter. We are asking each school to limit its enrollment to two 

Send enrollments direct to Livestock Extension Specialists, Animal Science Department, 
Urbana, 111, , with a. copy to your farm adviser Be sure to designate which school you wish 
to attend 

We will furnish all equipment Each boy should bring work clothes and shoes. Each school 
will start at 9:00 a m on the first day and end at 3:00 p.m on the following day 

We do not want boys who have been to the school before to return as regular students li 
such boys want to be checked out, they can return for the second day of the school, if they 
bring their own equipment They do not need to enroll in advance 

GER/WHW 



AIDS, February 1966 -6- 



AGRICULTURAL EBUCATIO 




Graduate assistantship in Agricultural Education Division . The following persons are graduate 
assistants in agricultural education. Information about them follows: 

Ullin S. Andrews was born and reared near Neoga, Illinois. He graduated from 
Neoga High School in 1961. He received a B.S. in agriculture from the University 
of Hlinois in 1965. His student teaching was done at Mattoon. While doing under- 
graduate work, he was a member of the Agricultural Education Club and Alpha Tau 
Alpha. He is presently working toward an M.Ed. He is spending the year as a 
counselor in the University Residence Halls and as a graduate assistant in agricul- 
tural education. 

Robert D. Cottingham was born in Oak Park, Illinois, and has lived most of his life 
in LaGrange. After graduating from Lyons Township High School, he completed one 
year of college work at Lyons Township Junior College and transferred to the 
University of Illinois. While doing his undergraduate work, he was a member of the 
Agricultural Education Club and Alpha Tau Alpha. He received his B.S. degree from 
the University of Illinois in agricultural science with a major in agricultural education 
and is presently working toward his Master of Education Degree in agricultural educa- 
tion. 

Arthur E. Eichelberger was born and reared in Scott County, Mississippi. He 
attended East Central Junior College in Mississippi for two years before entering 
Mississippi State University. While doing undergraduate work at MSU, he was a 
member of the Agricultural Education Club, the Agronomy Club, and served on the 
University's soil judging team. In 1963 he received a B.S. degree in agricultural 
education and was employed for two years as a teacher of vocational agriculture at 
Raleigh High School, Raleigh, Mississippi. He is now a research assistant in agri- 
cultural education at the University of Illinois working toward a Master of Education 
Degree in agricultural education. He is married to the former Sue Martin of 
Raleigh, Mississippi. 

Carl Hart was born and reared in McLean County near LeRoy, Illinois. He grad- 
uated from LeRoy High School in 1960. He attended Illinois State University at 
Normal where he received a B.S. degree in agricultural education in 1965. He is 
now a graduate assistant in agricultural education at the University of Illinois and 
a candidate for the Master of Education Degree in agricultural education. 

Darwin P. Swanson was born and reared in Woodhull, Illinois. He graduated from 
AlWood High School in 1960 and entered six months active duty in the Army as a 
member of the National Guard. He entered the University in the spring of 1961 
and received his B.S. in June 1965. While at the University he was a member of 
ATA. He is currently working on a Master of Education Degree in agricultural 
education. He is married to the former Judith Nash of Urbana. 



AIDS, February 1966 



Daniel E. Vogler was reared in McDonough County, Illinois. He graduated from North- 
western High School, Good Hope, Illinois, in 1959. He attended Western Illinois University 
two years and majored in agriculture. While at Western he belonged to the Agriculture Club, 
Dramatic Club, and Sigma Zeta, Honorary Science Fraternity. He transferred to the Uni- 
versity of Illinois in 1961 and received a B.S. in agriculture in 1963. While at the University, 
he belonged to the Agricultural Education Club, Alpha Tau Alpha, and SNIB. Following gradu- 
ation, he was employed as vocational agriculture teacher at Warsaw, Hlinois. He is now com- 
pleting work toward the M.Ed, in agricultural education. He is married to the former 
Jean Slater of Augusta. 

Information regarding four additional graduate assistants in agricultural education will be in 
the next issue of the Agricultural Education News. 

LJP 

Research concerning the meaning of words . Martin McMillion is conducting a research pro- 
ject funded by the U.S. Office of Education. Professor Lloyd Phipps is the project director. 
The main purpose of the project is to compare the meaning placed on words by the lower 
socioeconomic classes of students and by their vocational agriculture teachers. Examples 
of the words being studied are: leadership, cooperation. Future Farmers of America, agri- 
cultural mechanics, and teacher of agriculture. 

Twenty -one vocational agriculture teachers near Champ aign-Urbana are cooperating in the 
study. 

LJP 

What's your department's image ? Vocational agriculture in some communities has a poor 
image. Some believe that vocational agriculture prepares boys only for farming, that the 
vocational agriculture teacher lives a "soft" life, and that perhaps vocational agriculture 
should be removed from the school's offering. We know these statements are not true. 
This problem does not exist in all areas of the state, but it does exist in too many areas. 
Invariably the communities that have these ideas are not informed. Thus, let's "step-up" 
our PR (public relations) programs. The following is a foundation for improving your de- 
partment's PR. 

1. Possess a positive attitude. No one is sold with an apology or an excuse, 
for excuses and apologies please only those who make them. 

2. Publicize your accomplishments. The FFA reporter can handle the FFA 
with your aid and prompting. However, the adult program, class work, 
and supervised farming and placement-employment experience programs 
must be publicized by you. Your annual report to the state department 
will serve as an excellent source of factual data concerning your program. 

3. Use all the media to inform. An advisory council, radio, television, 
display boards, exhibits in banks, banquets, newspapers, and annual 
reports to the board of education are a few r suggestions that should be 
beneficial. 

-4. Evaluate your public relations program. Don't "get in the rut" of doing 
the same things year after year. Look closely at your public relations 
program when you are looking at the total program of the department. 
Keep a list of your public relation activities. If you find weeks going by 
when nothing is done, then your public relations program and the total 
department program needs your scrutiny. 



DEV 



AIDS, February 1966 



Vocational agriculture brochu res. Have you seen the three -fold brochures the vocational 
agriculture teachers at Woodstock, Sterling, Rushville, Pleasant Hill , Virginia, San Jose, 
and Mason City have published to change and improve the image of vocational agriculture in 
their communities? The efforts of these teachers are to be commended If you are inter- 
ested in this public relations technique, perhaps some of these teachers will loan you a copy 
of their brochures. 

LJP 

Pl acemen t report. As of January 10, 1966 there were four high school vocational agriculture 
vacancies listed with the placement office. 

NDE 

Votec 472, "Course Planning and Teaching Procedures" will be offered on campus the second 
semester this year. The course is scheduled for Tuesday evenings, 7;00 to 9:00 p m in 
Room 33, Education Building. The first session is February 8. 

Teachers within 50 miles of the campus may wish to take advantage of this opportunity to 
start replanning their courses of study for next year and to consider adjustments in teaching 
procedures 

Registration for commuting teachers is scheduled for February 5, 8:00 am to 12:00 noon. 
Bring proof of hospitalization insurance so that you will not be charged for university insur- 
ance. 

AHK 

1966 summer ses sio n courses , The following agricultural education courses will be offered 
the first four weeks of the 1966 summer session at the University of Illinois, June 20-July 15. 
All of these courses will focus on the "new" vocational agriculture program. Perhaps you 
should be sure that you are still in and will continue to remain in the "mainstream" of agri- 
cultural education by attending the 1966 four-week summer session. 



C ourse 

Votec 459(a) Teaching Ornamental Horticulture 

Votec 459(b) Teaching Agriculture Supply and 
Service 

Votec 473 Vocational Education in Agriculture 
for Adults 

Votec 474 Supervised Agriculture Experience 
Programs 

Votec 476 Guidance in Agricultural Education 



Unit 
Credit 


Time 


Instructor 


1/2 


1-3 MTWTF 


Hemp 


1 


8-11 and 
1-5 TWTF 


Warmbrod 


1/2 


8-10 TWTF 


Fuller 


1/2 


3-5 TWTF 


Phipps 


1/2 


10-12 TWTF 


Krebs 



LJP 

Graduate assistantships in agricultural education for 1966-67 , Several graduate assistantships 
will be available in agricultural education for 1966-67. A half-time assistantship pays $250 
per month plus tuition and fees for a person working toward a Master's degree. A person work 
ing toward a Doctor's degree receives $266 per month plus tuition and fees If interested, write 
Lloyd J, Phipps, 3 57 A Education Building, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, 61803. 

LJP 



AIDS, February 1966 



Elizabeth Simpson, nominee for President of American Vocational Associatio n Soon all 
members of AVA will receive ballots for voting for the next president of the American Voca- 
tional Association This year we will have an opportunity to support a nominee from Illinois , 
You should have the following information regarding our Illinois nominee: 

Elizabeth J. Simpson, professor of vocational and technical education and chairman 
of the Division of Home Economics Education. Department of Vocational and Technical Educa- 
tion, University of Illinois, has served as AVA Home Economics vice-president since 
July 1965. 

A life member of AVA, Dr. Simpson has served the organization as a member of 
the Public Information Committee, program chairman for the Home Economics section, 
and chairman of the National Association of Home Economics Teacher Educators. She 
wrote the section on home economics in the 1965 NSSE Yearbook on Vocational Education 
The most recent revision of the AVA publication, Y ou and Resea rch, is the work of 
Dr Simpson. She participated in two national vocational education research seminars 
sponsored by the AVA and the Office of Education of HEW Her views regarding the future 
of home economics education were expressed in an article on 'Projections in Home Econom- 
ics Education" in the November 1965 issue of the Ame rican Vocat ion al Jou rnal 

During 1964-65, when Dr Simpson served as chairman of the Coordinating Council 
of the three major national home economics education organizations, the Council led in 
conducting a national conference on contemporarj issues in home economics education 
Dr Simpson has been particularly concerned with the clarification and issues in home 
economics education and in vocational education in general and with the development of a 
free spirit of inquiry within the field , 

Born and reared in Indiana, Dr. Simpson received her B.S degree at Indiana State 
University, her M S, at Iowa State University, and the Ed.D. degree at the University of 
Illinois. She has taught at junior and senior high school, adult, and undergraduate and 
graduate university levels. She has worked with average, culturally disadvantaged, and 
gifted high school students : She has been teacher, supervisor, researcher, and admin- 
istrator of a division now totaling ten full-time and part-time staff members. Her uni- 
versity teaching experiences have been in Indiana. South Carolina, and Illinois She has 
served as curriculum consultant, leader or featured speaker at home economics confer- 
ences in Illinois, Indiana, Arizona, Florida, Georgia, California, North Carolina. 
South Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, North Dakota, Kansas, Wisconsin, and Michigan, 
and a number of cities and colleges throughout the count iv 



'S'- 



Her current research activities include involvement in two projects funded under 
the Vocational Act of 1963 She is chief investigator on a project aimed at development 
of a classification system for educational objectives, psychomotor domain. 

Dr. Simpson's understanding and appreciation of the various aspects of vocational 
education have been broadened through her services on the Executive Committee and Policy 
and Procedures Committee of the University of Hlinois Department of Vocational and 
Technical Education. 

LJP 



AIDS, February 1966 -4- 




IAVAT 



NEW! 



ILLINOIS ASSN. OF VO-AG TEACHERS 



John Baker reports he has lined up the following program for the Vo, Ag teachers 
section at the TVA Convention in Chicago on March 11 — 

9:45 AM - Training needed for post high school teaching 

1:30 PM - Urban-Rural Relationships 

Irwin B Johnson, Chicago Board of Trade 

2:30 P.M - Report on new ag programs operating in Illinois 

John states he is setting March 15 as the date for committee reports to reach him 
If any of the committees are meeting at the IVA Convention, the chairman should plan to 
get a report to John at the conclusion of the conference or shortly thereafter. 

Your president, attended the Illinois Research and Development Coordinating Unit 
work shop for Vocational Education at Springfield. January 11-12 

I heard talks given by Dr Grant Venn, Supt of Schools, Wood County, Parkersburg, 
Virginia: Dr Rupert Evans, Dean, College of Education, University of Illinois; Mr Ray Pag' 
Superintendent of Public Instruction; and Dr Allen Lee University of California, Berkeley 
Dr, Vern and Dr Lee formerly were teachers of vocational agriculture 

About 150 of the outstanding leaders from business and industry, agriculture, labor, 
governmental and educational agencies and institutions were present 

I am of the opinion that the conference will result in an expansion and redirection of 
effort to maximize the benefits of the program of vocational and technical education in Illinois 

Your president attended part of the IAA - EFA Conference at 1SU during the Christmas 
holidays. Our association is appreciative of this fine program and the many other excellent 
programs and activities sponsored during the year by the Illinois Agricultural Association 
and affiliated companies for Vo Ag T achers and the FFA Why not express your gratitude 
in a letter to them soon? 



T * * * ^ » 



Your president was among the special honored guests at the Illinois Agricultural Assoc 
iation Golden Anniversary Celebration and the Founders Luncheon at the University of Illinois 
Januar3 T 26 The luncheon guests were seated in a special section at the program and were in- 
troduced to the huge assembly It was a rewarding and delightful experience 



AIDS, February 1966 



-1- 



Joe W. Berger reports that our directory shows 447 teachers of vocational agriculture 
in Illinois this year 

Joe reports that only 7 teachers have not paid their dues. Sections still not listed as 
100% membership sections are: 

Section 4-1 teacher 

Section 6-2 teachers £ 

Section 17-1 teacher 

Section 18-2 teachers 

Section 23-1 teacher 

We would like to report 100% membership in the next news release. 

« t * * > + 

The shortage of vocational agriculture teachers will be more acute next year than 
ever before in the history of our country As a teacher of vocational agriculture will you 
be able to say, "I encouraged a boy to enter the profession of teaching vocational agricul- 
ture?" 

. X * J, ♦ -. 

Your president requested that George Irvine and E L "Doc" Rice submit articles 
on the topic "My Professional Organization, the NVATA " or in terms of "What the NVATA 
Has Done For Me, " These articles will be submitted to the Agricultural Education Magazine 
with the hope they might be selected for the April issue which will be devoted to 'The NVAT^ 
Your Professional Organization " 

As you would suspect, these men came up with some excellent writing which J am 
submitting to you in this issue of our Newsletter 

My Professional Organization, the NVAT A - by Geo rge Irvine 

It isn't just enough to be an ag teacher The goal should be to be a professional ag 
teacher 

It wasn't until I attended my first NVATA Convention that I started to realize we ag 
teachers are a professional group, just as much so as an organization of doctors and lawyers 

I sincerely believe as long as the teachers as a whole believe they are "just teactu - s" 
they will not be a professional and they cannot expect others to class them as professional 

This means being optimistic instead of pessimistic about out profession. It means 
taking part in our organization locally and nationally instead of having the "letting the other 
fellow do it" attitude It means to have pride in your organization. It means that you be- 
lieve in what you are doing Only by taking pari in our organizations will we learn and de- 
velop a professional attitude 

As the late President Kennedy stated. "It is not what your coum i y < an do for you. 
but what you can do for your country " This is very true in our own situation locally and 
nationally Let us feel it is what we can do for our organization, rather than what it can 
do for us 

Also true today are the words of Lincoln, who said, "Every man owes something to 
his profession " 

I believe you will agree with me that there is not another professional teaching i 
anization that has a stronger national organization than the NVATA It gives me pride to be 
part of a group that is so highly respected 

The NVATA has made me realize that I am a professional ag teaciu i 

| f * * 

AIDS February 1966 -2- 



The bit of literary genius by "Doc" Rice carries the idea of the letters NVATA through- 
out It is unique, interesting and original 

My Professional Organization, the NVATA 
by E L . Rice 

Need Vocational Agriculture Teachers All 

Nourish Viewpoints And Tenets Alike ? 

No. Very Avid Teachers Aspire 

New Visions And Timely Approaches 

Notable Vocational Agriculture Teachers Arouse 

Noteworthy, Vibrant, Adroit Talents A 

Neophyte Very Aptly Takes A 

Nonplussed View About These Adjectives, 

Now Veteran Aces Think Awhile, 

Nudge Viewpoints, Apply Their Acumen 

Novel Varied Authentic Training Abounds 

Negligent, Vapid, Apathetic Teaching Absconds 

Noble Volumes Argue To Assess 

Needed Values Applicable To Agriculture 

Night Visions Are Transmitted Affluently. 

No Valuable Association Thrives Anytime 

Nude (of) Vigorous Alert Teachers A 

National Vocational Association Touches Acme 

Necessarily Via A Teamwork Alliance 

Needed - Vocational Agriculture Teachers AH 

* *- + * » * 

The attitude taken by the Illinois High School Association concerning the sanction of 
FFA and Vo Ag.. activities during school hours has "fired up" a number of our ag teachers. 

One such teacher is Loren Mills, Belvidere Loren has written a letter to his local 
school administrators giving his feelings, The administrators are in agreement with Loren 

Loren has presented copies of the letter to ag, teachers in his section, suggesting 
that they use the letter, or a similar approach. A copy of the letter follows: 

'Subject: Away -from -school Vocational Agriculture activities during school hours 

"For some years the Illinois High School Association has complained about vocational agricul- 
ture activities during school hours They have threatened several times to withdraw their 
'godly' approval 

"This year the teachers in Section 24 received the following reply when they requested sanction 
for a contest: 'The Board of Directors of the Illinois High School Association has instruct 
us to not approve activities of the type listed on your sanction blank if they are held daring 
school hours when students and teachers would be required to miss their regular class. 

AIDS, February 1966 -3- 



'The reactions to this condition are obvious: 

"1 How can they honestly take such a position, when they sanction basket- 
ball tournaments during school hours, which take many hundred students 
from class? Anyone who has taught in a school whose team is in a state 
tournament knows that there is a complete disruption of any school order- 
liness during a tournament Consequently, that tournament interferes 
with the educational progress of thousands of students When we have a 
contest it involves five students from our school . And we do not interrupt 
their education; we enhance it 

"2. I have never been convinced that the Illinois High School Association has a 
genuine interest in schools Their main interest is athletics, 

"3 Vocational agriculture instructors are sports-minded Farm kids make 
up a good part of the athletic teams 1 have never taught a year without 
encouraging boys to participate in sports But with this ridiculous atti- 
tude we are facing, I am quickly changing my mind. 

"4 If there is any place in our society where Americanism is paramount, it 
is in the schools. If the double-talk the Illinois High School Association 
is giving us, is in the name of democracy then we should take down the 
flags in many thousand classrooms 

"5 If Belvidere High School is going to be a member of the Illinois High School 
Association, I think we should demand an honest answer to this question. 
How can the Illinois High School Association refuse sanction of an educa- 
tional activity which involves such a few people for one afternoon and 
sanction an athletic activity which interferes with the academic progress 
of hundreds of students for several days ? " 

Regarding the matter of sanctions by the IHSA, it is my understanding that our 
Chief, Ralph Guthrie, is working with the IHSA to get an agreement concerning sanctions 
of FFA and Vo Ag activities scheduled on school time 

Those of us who know Chief Guthrie rest assured that we are well represented and 
feel that we can expect some favorable results 

I believe I will be able to report something favorable on this matter in the next issue 
of our newsletter. 

I am issuing a plea to sectional public relations officers Earl Traver. Paul Cranfill , 
Lee D West and Leland Ashby, Jr , to get news for the March AIDS to me by February 15. 
I would also like news from the Section 13 reporter, whose name I can't locate at the present 

****** 

Official records list the following teachers of vocational agriculture in Illinois as 
eligible for awards at the June Conference.. If you question our records, please contact 
your president If there is any mistake in the spelling or the stating of your name and 
school, we will be glad to make a correction Otherwise they will stand as posted on the 
following page 



AIDS, February 1966 -4- 



Vo-Ag Teachers - 10, 20, 25, 30, 40 
(Information Secured from Annual Information Reports) 

1965-66 



10 -Year 



Aviston, Leon Luber 
Bluffs, Bernard Goetz 
Brownstown, Maurice Watkins 
Christopher, Leavell Swink 
LaMoille, Harlan Ehmen 
LaSalle, Don Wiechman 
Mascoutah, E. L. Sandusky 



20-Year 



Carmi, Ernest O. Johnson 
Carthage, Ben Schroder 
Fairview, Charles L, Harn (21) 
LeaJ River, W. C, Asbury 
Maple Park, T. W\ Anderson (19|) 
Mulberry Grove, Russell Weger 
U of I, R. F Espenschied 



25 -Year 



Carrollton, Arthur Eicken 
Colfax, T. R. Miller 
Dallas City, James A, Webb 
Gibson City, Charles Crowley (24.4) 
Greenville, Carl S. Brock 
Benton, B. L, Finley 



Mendon, Morton W„ Evans 
Mt. Carroll, Elmer C„ Gerlach 
Newton, Dwight Mobley (9 J) 
Oakwood (Fithian), W. A. Hockett 

(10 + 4 in service) 
Pecatonica, Ronald Welling 
San Jose, Robert Albers 
Streator, Don Higgs 



Oblong, Carl E. Chapman 
Rochester, Dale Barthel 
Table Grove, Ralph Hunter 
Vandalia, Max Grinnell 
Woodstock, George Forgey 



Mt, Vernon, Carl Gaston (25 1/3) 
Palestine, Paul Walker 
Polo, Keith McGuire (24^) 
Saybrook, Albert Bain 
Taylorville, Albert Schutte 



30 -Year 



Galesburg, Ray Dunn (29 h) 
Hinckley, Leslie Saddoris 
State Office, H. M. Strubinger 



Highland, R. D. Eiler 



40 -Year 






Normal, C. J. Kuster 



SECTION 10 NEWS: 

Section 10 began the year with four new teachers: 

John Duis at Wellington 
John Peden at Reddick 
Larry Stevenson at Milford 
Steve Kingry at Clifton Central 

Steve Kingry has left Central, and George Kreider has taken his place, 
at Wellington last year. 



George was 



ADDS, February 1966 



-5- 



Roland Meyer and Don Whitten, Cissna Park, are continuing with a course in 
Ag Occupations Cissna Park is a pilot center this year as it was last 

Joe Griffin, St Anne, is in his second year of a vo» ag, program for non-farm boys, 

Shelby Willis, Onarga, is a Sunday School teacher and secretary -treasurer of Lions 
Club. 

Eldon Chapman, Herscher, is attending Ag Eng,. 381 class at Morris, 

Jokes by Shelby Willis, Onarga. 

Student - "Teacher, can I go to the toilet?" 
Teacher- "Did you say 'can' ?" 
Student - 'No , I said 'toilet' " 

A freshman defined a trocar as "a bloated cow puncher " 

Gary Watt 
Section 10 
Public Relations Officer 

..*» + », 

Don Coil has notified me of a change in the method of selecting award winners in the 
National FFA chapter awards program. Section D part IV of the national chapter award 
program application form now reads: An application for a National Chapter Award, sub- 
mitted to the National FFA office, may include not more than 12 black and white, 5" x 7" 
glossy print photographs, 10 of which may represent each of the 10 divisions cf the chapter 
activities However, the caption describing the activity must be limited to not more than 
50 words on each picture, 

A chapter may submit a two -page, double -spaced, typewritten statement, describ- 
ing one or more of the chapter's activities. 

Positively no other supplemental material will be considered 

Don says this will make no change in the method of selecting chapter program of 
work entry winners on the state level For state competition we need a superior chapter 
with National Chapter Award Program Forms I, II, and III completed along with a com- 
pleted program of work, 

The State Judging Contest date has been changed The contest will be held June 23. 



AIDS, February 1966 -6- 



(tear sheet) 

): Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 

Please send the following Items: 

Number Price* Amount Item 



$3 . 00 Safety glasses with side shields 

1.25 Flexible plastic face masks 

. 25 _ Meat Judging and Grading, 32 pages 

15. 00 Set of six soil samples of known soil -test results 

Slidefilms 
2. 15 182-65 Supp. - Practice Set for Identification of Pork Cuts 

2 25 183-65 Supp. - Practice Set for Identification of Beef Cuts 

2.04 185-65 Supp - Practice Set for Identification of Lamb & Variety C 

Grain Rings fo r Judging 
2.00 __ Ring of Corn (4 samples) 

2.00 Ring of Oats (4 samples) 

2 00 Ring of Soybeans (4 samples) 

2. 00 Ring of Wheat (4 samples) 

7 . 50 Complete set of 4 rings above 

Tape Recordi n gs: Careers in Agriculture 

; ' _ . . Stepping Stones to Success in the College of Agriculture (U of I) 

(1 50f 

J ' Choosing a Career in Agronomy (U of I) 

- ° ,.. . Choosing a Career in Ornamental Horticulture (U of I) 



(3 .50 
(1 50t 



Junior College Vocational Programs in Agriculture 



*Prices do not include postage. 

tPrice of tape recordings is $1. 50 if you send in your own tape; or $3 50 if we furnish a 
new tape e 

Name School 



Address_ 
Billing 



AIDS, February 1966 



(tear sheet) 



0: Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



(check) 



Please send our FFA roadside signs. Shipping charges may be placed on our 
open account. 

Name 



School 



Address 



COMPOSITE ORDER 



Number Price* Amount 



$3.00 



Item 
Set of 24 samples of crop seeds used in 
State Crops Judging Contest 



*Price does not include postage. 



Name 



Address 



Billing 



School 



AIDS, February 1966 



INDEX TO ITEMS IN VO-AG SERVICE SECTION 

Page 

Agriculture College Students ........................... 3 

Bulletins and Circulars ............................. 3 

Change of Date of Judging Contest ................. 5 

Crop Seed Samples ........... . . 2 

Extramural Courses in Agriculture ............. ........ 2 

Farm Management Manual .............. , . , 6 

FFA Roadside Signs. ..... ................ 1 

Film Reports — Color Slide Sets . , ............ 4 

Illinois Spring Barrow Show , , ....... ........... 5 

In-Service Courses Scheduled ..... ......... ... ... 1 

Meat Judging and Grading ................. ........ 5 

Meat and Milk Judging Contest ....... 5 & 6 

New Color Slidefilms , . .... ..... 5 

1966 Vegetable Variety Recommendations ...,....-. 4 

Reprinting of Units Completed . 1 

Revised Listings and Order Forms .............. .... ... 6 

Safety Glasses . . ... ........ .... . 1 

Sample Grain Rings for Judging . . . . . . . ...... 4 

Scholarships in Agricultural Communications . ........ 3 

Sheep Shearing Schools ... ....... ... ...... 6 

Soil Samples of Known Soil -Test Value ........ 4 

Tapes on Careers in Agriculture ........... , . 5 



AIDS, February 1966 



PRICE LIST OF FEEDS- 

The feed prices for many of the feedstuffs used in vocational agriculture projects are listed 
below. This list is meant to be used as a basis of values for all boys obtaining their feed at 
home. Feed purchased should be recorded at prices paid. 

Kind of feed Jan. 14 



— Prepared in cooperation with the Department of Agricultural Economics 

2/ 

— Or convert to dry hay equivalent containing 90 percent dry matter. 



Corn, shelled, bu $1,15 

Corn, ground shelled or ear corn, bu. 1.25 

Oats, bu. . .65 

Oafs, ground, bu. . . . , , .75 

Barley, (feed) bu. . ... .90 

Barley, ground or rolled, bu. 1.00 

Grain sorghum, cwt 1.90 

Grain sorghum, cracked, cwt 2.00 

Skim and buttermilk, cwt . 1,50 

Whole milk, Grade B, cwt. . . . . 3.00 

Corn silage, ton .................. ........ 9,50 

Sorghum silage, ton . . . . . . 8.50 

Haylage. ton 14.00^ 

Clover and mixed hay) .... , . 22 00 

Alfalfa ) Ml hay and straw Prices 24 0Q 

Timothy are for baled. Figure ; ; ' 

Oat or wheat straw ) lo ° se at $5 less P er ton . . . 18 00 



2/ 



February 1966 



VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE SERVICE 

university of Illinois - College of Agriculture 

434 MUMFORD HALL - URBANA, ILLINOIS 



SERIALS DEPARTMENT 
"NIV Of ILL LIBRARY 



SSHL 



Cop?- 



VO-AG AIDS 



Volume 24, Number 8 
March 1966 



Issued jointly by 
Vocational Agriculture Service, College of Agriculture 

and 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

in Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 









17 






: 



VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 



N ew Bulletins and Circulars Four new circulars were released this past month and were 
included in March Agricultural Releases They are: 

Cir 922 Fertilizing Greenhouse Vegetables. 5<? 

Cir 924 Feeding, Managing and Exhibiting Lambs, 10£ 

Cir. 926 Get the Most from Your Oats, 5<? 

Cir 928 200 Bushel Com: Is it Possible on Your Soils '? . 5C 

Prices shown are for quantity distribution out of state. Illinois teachers may request in the 

usual manner m r»» 

JWM 

Safet y Glasses . All outstanding orders for safety glasses have been filled and both types, the 
regular safety glasses with side shields and the plastic face masks are now in stock for imme- 
diate delivery They are repeated again on the tear sheet order form in the back of this issue 
of the AIDS 

JWM 

Crop Se ed Sample s All orders for the sets of 24 crop seed samples made up by the Agri- 
cultural Education Club have been sent out, A total of 100 sets were made up and 90 orders 
were received prior to February 20 It is doubtful if there will be any left by the time you 
read this but please let us know if you sent in an order and have not received your seeds, 

JWM 

Northern Illinois Pur e bred Dairy Calf Sale The following information was sent to us by 
V. M Bokemeier, Freeport: 

Tne Northern Illinois Purebred Dairy Calf Sale will be held on Saturday. 
March 26. 1966 The sale will be held at the County Highway building, 
corners Walnut and South streets. Freeport. commencing at 12:00 nonn 
Junior and Senior calves of highest quality should be of interest to FFA 
and 4-H breeders Several breeds will be represented but mostly Holstein 
and Brown Swiss 

VMB/JWM 

Swine Day, U niversi t y of Illin ois, will be held March 22 at the University Auditorium The 
morning session includes reports by the swine division staff on the effects of protein level 
for swine on pasture and drylot, management studies with pigs at four weeks of age. wheat 
and rye as replacements for corn, research on waste disposal methods, and outlook for 1966 
The afternoon session includes presentations by Professor Nalbandov of the Animal Genetics 
Dept , Carl Foster. Ridgway, Wilbur Paulus, Lincoln, and Vernon Pilger, Beard stown 

A copy of the completed program will be sent to vocational agriculture instructors in the near 
future. All teachers and/or students are welcome to attend 

DEB/WHW 

AIDS, March 1966 -1- 



Sheep Shearing Schools Don't forget the dates of sheep shearing schools, if you or any of 

your students are interested For further details, see February VO-AG AIDS, contact our 

office, or Mr. G. E Ricketts of the Animal Science Extension staff „ 7TT „, 

WHW 

Spring Oats in Illinois for 1966 This report on oat varieties was included in the March Agri- 
cultural Releases. It includes the latest results from the agronomy research trials as well as 
yields from county demonstration plots, Quantity copies are available, but the supply is limited 
and will not be rerun _ T _ 

Sample Grain Rings for Judging All orders for grain judging samples received to date have 
been filled and we have approximately 25 complete sets left. Orders for these sets are avail- 
able at $7 50 plus postage, on a first-come, first-served basis It is included on the tear sheet 

for your convenience. 

R.LC 

Summary o f Prese n tations: Eighteenth Illinois Custom Spray Operators' Training School The 

custom spray manuals contain 51 presentations on current weed, insect, and disease problems 

A single copy was included in the March Agricultural Releases Additional copies are available 

at $1 00 per copy as long as the supply lasts 

KL(. 

Proceedings of the Illinois Fertilizer Cl inics — 1966 . This publication includes the presentations 
given at the fertilizer conference and was included in the March Agricultural Releases Single 
copies are available to those who did not receive one. „ T „ 

Approved Pra ctice s --Oats, Soybeans, and Wheat- -Revised Single copies of these 4-page 
revisions were included in the March Agricultural Releases Quantity copies are available at 
4 cents each, plus postage RT C 

1 965 Illinois Farmer Exper i ences with Na rrow -Row Corn This report is a summary of the 
results of a four-page questionnaire mailed to farmers who had grown corn in narrow-rows 
during the 1965 season A single copy was included in the March Agricultural Releases. Quant 
copies are available at 3 cents per copy, plus postage RLC 

Contr o lling Weeds with S e lected Herbicides in Fore st and Chr ist mas T ree Plantations was in- 
cluded in the March Agricultural Releases This was prepared by Professor W .. F Bulkley . 
Extension Forester Single copies are available to those who did not receive one rt r 

Agricu l tural Industrie s Forum The 8th Agricultural Industries Forum, conducted by Agricul- 
tural Economics and University Extension, is to be held at the Chicago Circle Campus. 750 Sout 
Ralsted, on March 22 and 23 The program has been planned in cooperation with representative 
from various industries Registration fee is $5 00 Programs and registration cards are avail 
able from: Dr Robert P Bentz, 427 Mumford Hall, Urbana, Illinois. 

JHH 

Farm Man a gement Manual This item has now been revised, duplicated, and included with the 
March Agricultural Releases We have obtained 350 copies beyond Agricultural Release needs 
and will sell them in quantity at 15 cents each, Copies of the Income Possibilities forms to go 
with the Manual are still available at 3 cents each You may use the tear sheet for convenience 
in ordering jtttt 

AIDS, March 1966 -2- 



Meat and Milk Judging Contests will be held at the U of I campus, April 2, starting at 10:00 a,m, 
Plea,se register at the Stock Pavilion in time for your boys to be at their respective places before 
judging time.. 

There will not be a milk judging demonstration prior to judging time. An exhibit of items, prop- 
erly placed, scored, or criticized will be set up for coaches and boys to see and discuss, We 
think this will be more educational to the contestants than the demonstration was. 

Attached to this copy of the AIDS is a self-addressed card for you to return if you plan to bring 
a team. This is not a preregistration, but a means of determining the number of teams to pre- 
pare for. Please return this card immediately if you expect to bring one or both teams. 

It is doubtful if the 1966 judging rules will be in your hands before this time. The rings are the 
same as last year. The meat and milk judging booklets will answer most of your questions. If 
they do not, please let us know immediately. Last year's judging rules are still correct in the 
listing of the rings. 

The revised meat identification slidefilms were announced last fall. Practice films to supplement 
the identification films were announced last month. All of these are still available if you are inter 
ested and have not already ordered them. 

WHW 



AIDS, March 1966 -3- 




AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION / COLLEGE OF EDUCATION / UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



1966 SUMMER SESSION , The 1966 Summer Program in Agricultural Education will empha- 
size the "new" program of agricultural education in high schools and junior colleges The 
dates for the four-week session are June 20 to July 15 Plan now to attend, making your 
course selections from the following: 

Votec 459 (G) Workshop in Curriculum Development — Ornamental Horticulture 
(| unit) 1-3 MTWTF .Hemp 

Votec 459 (H) Workshop in Curriculum Development—Agricultural Business and 
Industry (| unit) , 1-3 TWTF . . Warmbrod 

Votec 473 Vocational Education in Agriculture for Adults (g unit), 8-10 TWTF 

Fuller 

Votec 474 Supervised Agricultural Experience in Vocational Agriculture 

(iunit), 3-5 TWTF Phipps 

Votec 47 6 Guidance in Agricultural Education (| unit), 10-12 TWTF. . Krebs 

Hp Ed 305 History of Educational Ideas (|unit), 10-12 TWTF . Willers 

Ed Psy 312 Psychology of Learning for Teachers (| unit), 1-3 TWTF. . Jones 

Se Ed 448 Adult Education (| or 1 unit), 1-3 TWTF , Anderson 

Ag Econ 332 Livestock Marketing (3/4 or 1 unit), 10-12 MTWTF Broadbent 

Agron 301 Soil Fertility (| unit), 8-10 MTWTF . .Kurtz 

An Sci 305 Genetics and Animal Improvement (| unit), 1-3 MTWT. . DeFries 
and Touchberry 

Rural Soc 477 Rural Community Organization and Development (1 unit), 10-12 
MTWT Lindstrom 

JRW 

E370 Agricultural Education for First -Year Teachers Teachers employed at mid -year who 
are teaching in Illinois for the first time or returning to teaching are invited to attend the 
small group meetings of this extramural course Formal enrollment in the course will occur 
next fall, but participation this year will count toward completion of the course requirements 
The date, time, and place of the nearest meeting can be obtained by writing Gerald It Fuller, 
361 Education Building. 

GRF 



AIDS, March 1966 



Post-High School Teachers Attend E37 Workshop A special section of E37 has been estab- 
lished to meet the needs of teachers, men and women, who are employed for the first time to 
teach junior college vocational agriculture courses The first of three workshops for this group 
was held on the University of Illinois campus, Saturday, January 15, 1966 The following 
teachers participated in the workshop: 



Paul Hillis, Instructor 
Jesse Bradshaw, Technician 
Harold Huber, Instructor 
Edward Kaiser, Technician 
(Mrs. ) Alice Dries, Technician 
MaxKuster, Instructor and 

Chairman of Department 
Robert Jurgens, Instructor and 

Coordinator of Agricultural 

Supply Curriculum 
Maynard Boudreau, Instructor 
Ronald Seibel, Instructor 
Robert Irvin, Instructor and 

Chairman of Department 
John Yarbor. Technician 
Edwin Glass, Technician 
Joseph Dallon, Instructor and 

Chairman of Department 



Canton Community College 
Canton Community College 
Canton Community College 
Canton Community College 
Danville Junior College 



Joliet Junior College 



Joliet Junior College 
Joliet Junior College 
Joliet Junior College 

Wabash Valley College 
Wabash Valley College 
Wabash Valley College 
Chicago City Junior College, 
Woodrow Wilson Branch 



GRF 



Placement Report As of February 10, 1966, there were four vacancies for the second semester 
of the 1965-1966 school year eight vacancies for the 1966-1967 school year, and three junior 
college vacancies listed with the placement service NDF 

Student -Teacher Assignment s Twelve seniors will be participating in the student -teaching 
program during March 21 to May 7 . 1966 Names of student teachers plus other information 
are presented below: 



Name 

1 , Robert DeWolfe 

2 Alan Nay lor 

3 David Berg 

4. Gene Bork 

5. John L Huston 

6 Chas W Rayburn 

7 . Jerry Theobald 

8 Bruce L, Fryman 

9 Thomas J Marron 
10 Arnie Parchert 

11. Allen N Hornbrook 

12, Phillip L Landes 



Home 


High School 


Years of 


Cooperating 


High School 


Ag Teacher 


Vo_-_Ag 


Center 


LaFayette 


None 





St Joseph-Ogden 


Ashton 


H J McPheron 


4 


St Joseph-Ogden 


Paxton 


Robert Rohlfing 


4 


Rochelle 


Piper City 


H A Warner 


4 


Rochelle 


Roseville 


B A Tomlin 


4 


Henry 


Champaign 


J A Twardock 


3 


Henry 


Tri-City 


Jack Taylor 


4 


Sycamore 


Edwards Co 


H. C. Hendren 


3 


Sullivan 


Senior 


Steve Pollock 






Ml Carmel 







Joliet 


Sherrard 


Duane Gregory 


4 


Minonk 


Young America 


Banta Bundy 


4 


Sullivan 


Paris 


R J Smith 
H D Jensen 


2 


Minonk 



PEH 



AIDS, March 1966 



Pilot Teachers' Meeting Teachers of agriculture and guidance counselors from the four 
Illinois schools conducting pilot programs in agricultural occupations met with the agricultural 
education staff on January 29, 1966, Mr. James Smith, Chief of Vocational Guidance, and 
Mr. Ralph Guthrie, Chief of Vocational Agriculture made presentations to the group The 
general theme of the meeting was "How Can We Help High School Students Establish Occupa- 
tional Objectives?" Teachers of vocational agriculture attending the meeting were Mr. Donald 
Whitten and Mr. Roland Meyer of Cissna Park; Mr. Bill Washburn and Mr, Bobby Whittington 
of Olney; Mr. Richard Lowe of St. Elmo; and Mr George Forgey and Mr. Bill Pictor of 
Woodstock , 

PEH 

Votec 474, Sup e rvised Agricultural Experience in Vocational Agriculture, to Dis t rict I Next 
FalL Votec 474 will be available to District I teachers the first semester of the 1966-67 
school year. The course will be offered in two sections. The section for the northern part 
of the district will be offered on Tuesday evenings; and the section for the southern part of the 
district will be offered on Wednesday evenings 

The course description is as follows: 'Supervised agricultural experience programs as an 
educational strategy; planning, conducting, supervising, and evaluating agricultural experience 
programs; relation of supervised agricultural experience programs to establishment and 
advancement in an occupation; keeping" and using records. " \ unit 

Teachers interested will be asked to send a post card, by June 1, 1966, stating that they plan 
to enroll, to: 

A. H Krebs 
356 Education Building 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 

AHK 

Graduate Assistantships in Agricultural Education Division , The following persons are grad- 
uate assistants in agricultural education. Information concerning six graduate assistants was 
presented in the February issue of the Agri cultural Education News . Information regarding 
four additional assistants follows: 

Jam es Marshall was born and reared near Hamilton. Illinois He graduated from 
Hamilton High School in 1962, followed by two years of undergraduate work at Western Illinois 
1'niversity. He transferred to the University of Illinois where he received his B S in agri- 
culture. While doing undergraduate work he was a member of the Agricultural Education Club 
and is an alumnus ot the WIU Alpha Zeta Chapter He is currently working on a Master of Edu- 
cation Degree in agricultural education He is married to the former Helen Newman of Hamilton 

Gerald W May berry was born and reared in Hamilton County near McLeansboro, Illinois, 
He graduated from the Norris City-Omaha High School in 1961 He received a B S, m agricultu 1 1 
from the University of Illinois His student teaching was done at Belvidere. While doing under- 
graduate work, he was a member of the Agricultural Education Club He is a research assistant 
working for a Master of Education Degree in agricultural education. 

Vicente A Quiton was born and reared in Dolores, Samar, Philippines He obtained his 
secondary education at the Dolores High School, his B.S degree in agriculture at Silliman 
University, Dremoquete City and his M. S degree in Agricultural Education at the University 
of the Philippines, College of Agriculture at Los Bonos, Loguna. He taught agricultural economics 
at Silliman University for one semester and was granted a Graduate Research Fellowship for two 

AIDS, March 1966 -3- 



years at the University of the Philippines Tn 1964 he joined the Farm and Home Development 
Office of the UP. College of Agriculture as a researcher for the 'Pilot Study of a Cooperative 
Approach to Rural Development in Two Areas of Loguna Province, Philippines " He is a mem- 
ber of the Farm Gentries Club of Silliman University and the Alpha Tau Alpha, Eta-A Chapter 
of the UP College of Agriculture He is presently working toward a Doctor of Education Degree 
in agricultural education. 

Michael J .. Still was born and reared in Macon County near Mi Zion, Illinois He 
graduated from Mt Zion High School in 1962. While doing his undergraduate work at the 
University of Illinois, he was a. member of the Agricultural Education ( lub. Alpha Tau Alpha, 
and Alpha Zeta. He is now a research assistant in agricultural education at the University of 
Illinois, working towards a Master of Education Degree in agricultural education 

DEV 



AIDS, March 1966 -4- 



ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRIC 

NORMAL, ILLINOIS 61761 




AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



Student Teac hers for t he Second Semester Fourteen men are enrolled for student teaching the 
second semester and will report to the teaching centers for nine weeks of student teaching 
April 4 and complete their assignment on June 11, 1966 The men are enrolled for the first 
nine weeks in Methods and Procedures in Agricultural Education, and complete requirements 
in teaching and are available for teaching positions for the 1966-67 school year. 



Bartmess, Stephen B. 
Bitting, Donald 
Brucker, Gary Allen 
Dixon, George D 
Ginder, George 
Hickenbcttom, Loren 

Kwain, Dennis 

Maxwell, Robert 
Martin, Larry 
Mittelstaedt, Carl 
Patton, Gregory 
Shaffer, David 

Sigler, Leonard 
Stevens, James 



Home 


High School 


Years of 


Student 


High School 


Vo-Ag Teacher 


Vo -Ag 


Teaching 
( enter 


Hutsonville 


Mr Edwards 


1 


Streator 


Kewanee 


James L. Golby 


4 


Normal Com 


Octavia 


T R Miller 


4 


Morris 


Colchester 


Wayne Kern 


4 


New Lenox 


Glenwood 







Wapella 


V I T 


Ralph Hunter 


4 


Washington 


Table Grove 








Peotone 


Glen Shippy 
Gordon Sarb 


3 


Farmer City 


Wapella 


('has Shettler 


4 


Dwight 


Clinton 


Clyde Fry 


4 


Noi^mal Com. 


University High 







Flanagan 


Edinburg 







Pontiac 


McLean - 








Waynesville 


Elbert Mclntire 


4 


Eureka 


Normal Com 


C J Kuster 


4 


Williamsville 


Warsaw 


Carl Ceisler 


3 


Maroa 



KEJ 



Coop erativ e Teache r Con fe rence The Supervising Teachers Conference in Agricultural 
Education for the schools participating in the smdent teaching program at Illinois State 
University for the first semester met on campus January 18, 1966 Dr. Benton Bristol served 
as secretary for the meeting and Dr Kenneth James served as chairman The supervising 
teachers participating were: John Olson, Kirkland; Melvin Nicol, Maroa; Donald Kaufman, 
Morris; Robert R Van Rheeden, (Lincoln-Way) New Lenox; Daren Cox, Pontiac; Donald Higgs, 
Streator; E L Rice, Princeville Allan Utech, Supervisor in Agricultural Education, Voca- 
tional and Technical Education Division, Springfield also participated in the meeting 

KEJ 

Teache r Placement. A number of schools have already listed their needs for the 1966-67 
school year Three of the graduates for this year have already accepted teaching positions 
Several schools are anticipating a second teacher Schools wishing to list available teaching 
positions in vocational agriculture with Illinois State University should do so by writing or 
calling the Bureau of Appointments, Illinois State University, Normal, Phone 309-453 -2237 

KEJ 
AIDS, March 1966 




IAVAT 



NEWS 



ILLINOIS ASSN. OF VO-AG TEACHERS 



SPECIAL NOTE: 

It is with deep regret that I report the loss of one of our members 
Ernest R Lamkey, teacher of vocational agriculture at Oakland, passed 
away suddenly on February 10, 1966 Mr Lamkey received his 25-year 
award at the June Conference last year Our sincere sympathy goes to the 
members of his family 



* ** 



Mr Ralph Guthrie, Chief of Agricultural Education, Springfield, has been working in 
our behalf regarding the sanction of FFA and vocational agriculture activities by the Illinois 
High School Association It is my opinion that we have been well represented by Mr Gutnrie 
and through his efforts a favorable agreement has been reached More details about this 
agreement will be reported in the next issue of the AIDS 



A letter of resignation has been received from John Sweeney, Director of District III. 
John joined Mr Guthrie's staff as supervisor on February 15 to fill the vacancy left by 
H F Engelking Mr Guthrie has inlormed me that John Sweeney will be the supervisor in 
Sections 20, 21, 23, 24 and 25 Congratulations to John' I know he will make a good super- 
visor Mr St ru binger, who formerly had that territory, is now treasurer of the FFA 
Foundation and secretary to the State Sponsoring Committee He will also supervise Sections 
4, 11 and 12 

I would like public relations officers from Sections 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20 to send news 
for the April issue of our newsletter The news should reach me not later than March 15 

I am grateful to the sectional reporters for their regular news items 

^ T T 'T* T~ *T 

I would like a list of those teachers of vocational agriculture who are retiring at the 
end of the year It is necessary that we have the names of our retiring men in order to make a 
recognition at June Conference Please, fellows, send in your name to your president as soon 
as you have reached the decision to retire 



AIDS. March 1966 



This is a revised list of our teachers who are eligible for awards. I hope it is final 

Vo-Ag Teachers - 10, 20, 25, 30, 40 
(Information Secured from Annual Information Reports) 

1965-66 



10 -Year 



Aviston, Leon Luber 
Bluffs, Bernard Goetz 
Brownstown, Maurice Watkins 
Christopher, Leavell Swink 
LaMoille, Harlan Ehmen 
LaSalle, Don Wiechman 
Mascoutah, E L. Sandusky 
Canton Jr. College, Harold Huber 



Mendon, Morton W Evans 
Mt. Carroll, Elmer C Gerlach 
Newton, Dwight Mobley (9^ 
Oakwood (Fithian), W A Hockett 
(10 + 4 in service) 
Pecatonica, Ronald Welling 
San Jose, Robert Albers 
Streator, Don Higgs 



20 -Year 



Cai'mi, Ernest O Johnson 
Carthage, Ben Schroder 
Fairview, Charles L Ham (21) 
Leaf River, W. C, Asbury 
Maple Park, T W. Anderson (19^) 
Mulberry Grove, Russell Weger 
U of I, R F Espenschied 



Oblong, Carl E. Chapman 

Rochester, Dale Barthel 

Table Grove, Ralph Hunter 

Vandalia, Max Grinnell 

Woodstock, George Forgey 

Joliet Jr. College, Maynard Boudreau 



2 5 -Year 



Carrollton, Arthur Eicken 
Colfax, T R. Miller 
Dallas City, James A Webb 
Gibson City, Charles Crowley(24 4) 
Greenville, Carl S Brock 
Benton, B. L Finley 



Mt. Vernon, Carl Gaston (25 1/3) 
Palestine, Paul Walker 
Polo, Keith McCuire (24^ 
Saybrook, Albert Bain 
Taylorville, Albert Schutte 



30 -Year 



Galesburg, Ray Dunn (29^) 
Hinckley, Leslie Saddoris 
State Office, H M Strubinger 



Normal, C J Kuster 



Highland, R D. Eiler 



40 -\ ear 



* * , f * . 



At our June Conference the IAVAT will recognize members of the Association who 
have earned 'Thirty Minute Club" cards 

In order to be eligible for this club a teacher must have had articles or pictures pub- 
lished in farm or professional magazines that have national or regional circulation in at least 
three states Editors of state newsletters and winners of an NVATA Exchange of Ideas contesi 
are also eligible 

I would like any eligible member to notify me concerning his eligibility for the club 
At present James Guilinger, Williamsf ield , is the only one I have listed [ am certain this 
is not a complete listing. ****** 



AIDS, March 1966 



-2- 



George Irvine, the dependable Section 7 reporter, announces a Style Show for the 
wives on Thursday, June 9, during the Annual Ag. Teachers Conference 

The luncheon and style show will be held at the Illini Union 

In addition, other activities are being planned by a committee composed of 
Mrs George Irvine, Mrs Mervin Mixer, Mrs Clifford Sichta. Mrs John Baker and 
Mrs George Richter 

George says "Looks like a nice affair for the spouse, so let them know they are 
welcome at the conference " 

ifc jfc +- Jf + * 

I L Brakensiek and his committee are working on a new history of the IAVAT It 
will be distributed at June Conference, according to present plans The new history was 
authorized by your executive board last July 'Brak" and his committee deserve a lot of 
credit for their efforts 

Section 7 News 

Section 7 had 100% participation in the FFA Foundation Awards program held 
February 3 at Waterman, 

Vo. ag teachers in the LaSalle area held a breakfast meeting at the Holiday Inn in 
LaSalle Saturday, February 5 Arrangements were made by Don Wiechman, LaSalle vo 
ag. teacher. Mr. Dolan, of the LaSalle -Peru Junior College, discussed the "ins" and 'buts" 
of the new proposed Junior College for the area It was good to hear that agriculture is being 
considered in the plans 

Sixteen vo. ag teachers and their wives met at the Holiday Inn in LaSalle on 
January 26 for their annual Winter Meeting Sectional Chairman Don Kaufman of Moi 
conducted the business meeting following the dinner. 

Mr. Alan Utech of the state department was present Mr and Mrs Norman B McCTuie 
were also present. He is the new teacher at Lostant Carl Nelson, an ex-ag teacher, who has 
been substituting at Lostant was also present 

Don Wiechman, grain show committee chairman, gave a report Fred Morris was added 
to this committee. 

Fair Chairman Clarence Tipton gave a repoi^t and suggested that teachers contact local 
business men for more trophies for the sectional livestock fair At present eleven trophies 
presented at the livestock fair 

The Section 7 Foundation Committee was approved as follows: 

Charles Lane, Rochelle Bill Strong, Ottawa 

Bud Leone, LaSalle OwenStrine, Streator 

Lon Borger, Morris Lewis Barr, Tonica 

Bob Strong, Earlville Don Kaufman, Vo Ag. Teacher 

Fred Swanson, Mendota Gary Hensel, Section 7 FFA V Pres 



AIDS, March 1966 -3- 



Schools of Section 7 with new Ag. Occupational Experience Programs and their enroll- 
ments are as follows: 

Morris - 12 

Streator - 14 

Lostant - 1 

Mendota - 18 

Earlville - 5 

Woodland - 4 

New 'little ones" in Section 7 

In October Mr and Mrs Ken Eike of Ottawa welcomed a little girl to their home. 

In December it was Mr. and Mrs Don Wiechman, LaSalle, who welcomed a little boy 

There are possibilities of other little ones to appear in 1966 

George Irvine 

Section 7 

Public Relations Officer 

I have learned from Wayne Wolfe, president of the Missouri Association, that vo. ag 
teachers in Texas pay one-half percent of their salary in association dues Figure this on the 
basis of your salary and see how it compares with your present dues. 

The Texas association has also had an Executive Secretary for many years and is 
presently building a state headquarters for the association 



Section 5 News 



Section 5 held an Ag Teachers -Administrators -School Board member Banquet on 
January 19 at the Club 116 in Roanoke Mr A. A Redding, Assistant Director of Vocational 
Education in Illinois, spoke to an audience of approximately 80 persons about the implications 
of the Vocational Education Act of 1963 and what some of the school districts in Illinois arc- 
doing to implement it Mr Redding mentioned that two million dollars have been appropriated 
to develop area vocational schools and that at the present time less than one million has been 
spent 

This banquet is a regularly scheduled event for Section 5 and is held every two y< 
The members of Section 5 feel this is an excellent way to present our suite -wide programs to 
the administration and school board and that it is very good public relations work. 

Lynn Gosnell 

Section 5 

Public Relations Officer 

r * - ■ 

Section 12 News 

On Saturday, November 20, 1965, the Section 12 Grain Show and Crop Judging Contest 
was held at Mason City High School There were over five hundred entries in the show, and 
twenty teams participating in the judging contest, which was won by the Morton Chapter 

AIDS, March 1966 -4- 



The Ag teachers from this section met at The Prairie Trails Restaurant and Smorgasboarc 
on Thursday Evening, January 20, 1966 with host, Bob Albers of San Jose. After a bounteous 
Smorgasboard dinner the group enjoyed comments by Mr. Coil from the State Office, on Founda- 
tion Awards changes, changes in the Public Speaking Rules, and on news from the state office. 
Plans were made for the Summer Workshop in Animal Nutrition to be held in Pekin on August 1. 
at the First Nntiona.l Bank. The date of April 16 was announced for the Section 12 Dairy and 
Livestock Judging Contest to be held at Western Illinois University at Macomb, 

Lewistown High School served as host to the Section 12 Productive Foundation Awards 
Contest on Saturday February 5. Mr. Strubinger was present to represent the state staff in 
assisting with this contest. 

Morton High School serves as the host to the Non Productive Foundation Awards Contest 
and the Star and State Farmer interviews on February 12, 

Canton will be the site of the Section 12 Parliamentary Procedure Contest on March 21, 
and Pekin will host the Public Speaking Contest on March 31. 

The Section 12 Officers and Sponsors Banquet will be held at the Forrest ( ity Community 
Church on Thursday night, February 24, with the Forman FFA serving as hosts. 

The vo ag teachers from Section 12 all regret the loss of our State Supervisor for the 
past three yea.rs, Mr. Harold Engelking to Southern Dlinois University, but we wish to con- 
gratulate him on his new advisory position in the area of adult education We wish him well 

Fourteen agriculture teachers from Section 12 completed Votec 474 at Williamsville 
this winter under the capable instruction of Dr. Phipps, and Dr\ Hemp. Now, most of us are 
knee deep in Adult Agriculture Classes on a schedule somewhat later than usual. 

Paul W Cranfill 

Section 12 

Public Relations Officer 

Section 14 N ews 

Max Muirheid advisor of the Hliopolis FFA chapter, reports they have started a sheep 
project to provide livestock experience for the boys who live in town. The chapter pays all 
expenses and provides a place for the sheep. The town beys provide the lahot and are in 
charge of cue ewe per individual. They are paid $, r ; each lot the lambs from their ewes, 
which are returned to the chapter al the end ot school 

One of the teachers from Section 14 reporting on the Vo. Tech. 474 course taken at 
Williamsville says "I believe 474 was a helpful course in tha' i.1 certainly gave guide lines 
follow for setting up the ag. occupations type of course. How feasible this type o1 course is 
in the smaller community is somewhat questionable." 

Harold Elliott, vo ag teacher at Atlanta reports 5 boys working in Ins ag oc< upations 
program. Three are at a fertilizer plant, one at a hybrid seed corn company and one at a farm 
implement company They usually work from two to live hours on a. school day. 

Lee D. West 

Section 14 

Public Relations Officer 

* ijc ?(c ifc Jp ^ 

AIDS, March 1966 -5- 



Section 15 News : 

In order to get some Section 15 VO-AG AIDS news, I asked some of the teachers to 
comment briefly on this statement. "Some recent Vo-Ag accomplishment of which I am proud." 
Here are their comments: 

'1 am proud of two former students that are now teaching vo-ag--one with me here at 
Jerseyville " Charles Hamilton, Jerseyville. 

"I am proud of the new vo-ag facility we moved into last November The new building 
initiated something new in financing school buildings in that it is leased from the builders for 
a few years, after which it becomes the property of the school " Ray Da.A [s Bunkei Hill 

"I am proud of our American Farmer, John Wolff who received his degree last fall 
He is the first American Farmer ever to come from this chapter " Lee Ashby. Gillespie 

"I am proud of the $2000 worth of new tools purchased for the vo-ag shop Other 
notable accomplishments of our department in the past year have been, delegates from the 
chapter represented us at the National FFA Convention for the first time our chapter had 
its first sectional production award winner, and this year one of our chapter members won 
a State Farmer degree--the first ever to be won by a membei from our chapter We have 
also completed an adult farmer class in Rural Elec trificat ion and we now have an adult Corn 
C lass underway." Arley Van Doren, Southwestern High School, Piasa, 

'Our chapter has an annual pest eradication contest This year, as a community 
service, the FFA members killed pests which would have caused over $5000 damage to grain, 
buildings, and livestock The dollar estimate oi damages done are based upon Purdue 
University calculations. " Victor Funk, Franklin. Illinois 

'We have received sufficient copies of the new book Modern Corn Producti on b\ 
Aldrich and Lang and another new addition Combines and Combi ning, published by the Dept 
of Agriculture, Ohio State University, for use in classroom work 1 toe! the two books will 
be a great help in teaching these two subjects with the most up -to-date material availa 
Paul Ames. Waverlv 

'Some achievements made by our department oi which ' am pr< ud are (1] sue 
completion of fou i adull classes, (2\ a highly successful parent -son banquet, (3) participation 
and achievement of vo-ag classes in contests and I i A events " Cordon Adamson, Winch 

"We have 46 enrolled in an adult agronomy course relating to coin production We 
have farmers, business, and professional men who have an interest in agriculture enrolled 
Attendance has been high 

"Charles Daum, a senior, won the sectional corn production award this year 

"The Carrollton boys won the sectional parliamentary procedure contest this j 
Arthur Eicken, Carrollton 

Lei and E. Ashby, Jr 

Section 15 

Public Relations Officer 

AIDS, March 1966 -6- 



(tear sheet) 



TO: 



Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 

Please send the following items: 

Number Price* Amount 



Item 



$ 04 Approved Practices for Oats 

04 Approved Practices for Soybeans 

- 04 Approved Practices for Wheat 



1966 revisions 



7.50 



03 



Set of 4 Grain Rings for Judging 
(corn, oats, soybeans, wheat) 

1985 Illinois Fanner Experiences with Narrow-Row Corn 



1 00 



Illinois Custom Spray Operators' Manual — 1966 



15 



Farm Management Manual, 1966 



03 



Income Possibilities Form 



3 00 



1 25 



Safety Glasses with Side Shields 



Flexible Plastic Face Masks 



*Prices do not include postage. 



Name 



Address_ 
Billing- 






School 



AIDS, March 1966 



INDEX TO ITEMS IN VO-AG SERVICE SECTION 

Page 

Agricultural Industries Forum . . ... , „ 2 

Approved Practices » * . ..... .... 2 

Controlling Weeds with Selected Herbicides in Forest 

and Christmas Tree Plantations ... ... .2 

Crop Seed Samples . .. ... ..... 1 

Farm Management Manual , . . . ... .2 

Meat and Milk Judging Contests ... 3 

New Bulletins and Circulars ... . ... . . ... . . 1 

1965 Illinois Farmer Experiences with Narrow-Row Com . , .2 

Northern Illinois Purebred Dairy Calf Sale ..... . . 1 

Proceedings of the Illinois Fertilizer Clinics — 1966 . 2 

Safety Glasses . . . ... ... . . 1 

Sample Grain Rings for Judging 2 

Sheep Shearing Schools . .... . ... 2 

Spring Oats in Illinois for 1966 . . . . . ....... 2 

Summary of Presentations: 18th 111 Custom Spray Operators' Training School . . 2 

Swine Day , ......... . . , „ . .1 



AIDS, March 1966 



PRICE LIST OF FEEDS- 

The feed prices for many of the feedstuffs used in vocational agriculture projects are listed 
below This list is meant to be used as a basis of values for all boys obtaining their feed at 
home. Feed purchased should be recorded at prices paid 

Kind of feed Feb 14 

Corn, shelled, bu. , . ... $ 1.19 

Corn, ground shelled or ear corn, bu .................... 1.29 

Oats, bu ..68 

Oats, ground, bu. ....... ,78 

Barley, (feed) bu. .90 

Barley, ground or rolled, bu. 1.00 

Grain sorghum, cwt , 1.90 

Grain sorghum, cracked, cwt. ........................ 2.00 

Skim and buttermilk, cwt. . 1.50 

Whole milk, Grade B, cwt, 3.00 

Corn silage, ton , 9.50 

Sorghum silage, ton. 8.50 

Haylage, ton . . 14.50— 

Clover and mixed hay) ... , , , .............. 23.00 

Alfalfa All hay and straw prices .25.00 

_. , ' are for baled. Figure 21 00 

Otfor wheat straw ) loose at $5 less per ton. \\ [ [ \ \ \\ \\ \\ \ \ 18 . 00 



— Prepared in cooperation with the Department of Agricultural Economics. 
-Or convert to dry hay equivalent containing 90 percent dry matter., 



2/ 



AIDS, March 1966 



VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE SERVICE 

Unlvenlty of Illinois - Callage of Agriculture 

434 MUMFORD HALL ■ URBANA, ILLINOIS 



SER- - ;vJT 

UNIV Ov ILL LIBRARY 



SSHL 



'OR 1 , 




VO-AG AIDS 



Volume 24, Number 9 
April 1966 



Uswad {olnHy by 
Vocational Agriculture Service, College of Agriculture 

and 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

in Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 



VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 



New Bulletins and Circulars, Two new circulars were released this past month and were in- 
cluded in April Agricultural Releases. They are: 

Cir. 920 Organizing to Improve Your Community Environment, 10£ 
Cir. 929 Soybean Varieties in Illinois for 1966, 10£ 

Prices shown are for quantity distribution out of state, Illinois teachers may request in the 

usual manner. t TT ™„ 

JWM 

Crop Seed Samples . A few teachers have reported one or more bottles broken when their crop 
seed sample sets arrived. We have replaced those without charge and will continue to do so if 
you let us know promptly,. There are a few sets remaining that are available for $3.00 per set, 
plus postage, 

JWM 

Veterinary Medicine Open House . This event will be held on the University of Illinois campus 
at Urbana on Friday and Saturday, May 6-7, 1966, 

Two sets of information for posting and a program of exhibits, etc. are folded in with this issu* 
of the AIDS. You may wish to give one set to your principal or guidance counselor. You and 
your students are cordially invited to attend, 

WHW 

First Shipment of New Units . We expect to have the first shipment of advance order sets of 
new units ready to go in a few days. You should receive them shortly after you receive the 
AIDS , This shipment will include about half the new units and we plan to send the rest about 
the end of April. 

JWM 

Calendar of Events, 1966-67 . The calendar of events for next school year was included in 
April Agricultural Releases. A number of teachers have requested that they be sent out early 
so that dates can be put on them as they are announced. As usual, additional sets of the 
Calendar of Events are available at 15£ per set, plus postage. This item is included on the 
tear sheet. ^ VM 

Order Form for Agricultural Releases, etc . A copy of the order form for 1966-67 Agricultura 
Releases and . advance order new units, and slidefilms is included in April Agricultural Re- 
leases. These items may be ordered any time before October 1 but many teachers tell us they 
need the form now in order to make the proper budget request. 

JWM 

Visuals in Agricultural Releases . At a recent meeting of our advisory board of teachers it was 
recommended that a number of visuals be prepared for each issue of Agricultural Releases. 
Eleven visuals dealing with livestock, crops and soils are included in the April Releases. They 
are printed on 8-g" x 11" heavy paper suitable for making transparencies for overhead projectioi 
use with opaque projector, etc. You may wish to take them out of Releases and file them with 
whatever system you prefer. We have no plans for additional distribution at present. If there is 
a demand they can be assembled in sets and made available at a later date, JWM 

AIDS, April 1966 -1- 



A Description and Source Listing of Professional Information in Agricultural Education. 
This 20-page publication, included in April Agricultural Releases, was prepared by the 
Professional Information Committee, Agricultural Division of AVA. It lists a large number 
of publications developed in the past year that are available from many states. You will find 
the title, author, a brief description of the publication, and information telling you where 
and how to obtain it. 

JWM 

Livestock Marketing Field Day. Illinois Vocational Agriculture Livestock Marketing Field 
Day will be held on Tuesday, June 7, 1966 at National Stock Yards, Illinois starting at 
8:30 a.m. The following information about the program was sent to Mr. RaJph Guthrie by 
Mr. C. J. Smith, Director of Public Relations, St. Louis National Stockyards Company: 

"Upon arrival, students will be assembled into groups, each group will be 
assigned to a marketing agency salesman for a tour of the Yard's market- 
ing facilities, observing actual trading. 

'10:00 A.M. — Regroup at the Auction Arena for a discussion on open 
competitive public market supervision by representatives of the United 
States Department of Agriculture, with offices at National Stock Yards. 
Namely, the Agriculture Research Service, Animal Health Division; 
The Packers & Stockyards Division, and The Consumer & Marketing 
Service, Market News Branch. 

"12:00 Noon — Lunch (Courtesy of National Stockyards Market Interests/ 

"1:00 P.M. — Livestock grading and quality determination — (live animals; 
cattle, hogs and sheepl. 

'This phase of the program will be conducted by professional livestock 
salesmen and buyers. 



"2:30 P.M. Adjourn. 



WHW 



Beef Cattle Management Suggestions and Beef Cattle Feeding Suggestions. A copy of 1966 
Beef Cattle Management Suggestions and 1966 Beef Cattle Feeding Suggestions were included 
in the April Agricultural Releases. We have a small supply on hand and can accept quantity 
orders as long as the supply lasts. The price is 10£ per copy, plus postage. These are in- 
cluded on the tear sheet. 

The swine management and feeding booklets are at the printers and should be finished in time 
for May Releases. If so, they will be mentioned in the May AIDS. 

WHW 

New Slidefilms. Two new slidefilms have been sent to all schools that have 1965-66 advance 
orders for new slidefilms. This is the final shipment for this year. The new films are: 

439 - Using the Level to Stake Out a Building Site, $ .73 
498 - Using Power Lawn Mowers Safely (color), 3.45 

If you have an advanced order and did not receive these films, please let us know. These 
films are now available for general sale and are listed on the tear sheet for those who may 
wish to order 

RLC 



AIDS, April 1966 -2- 



Custom Spray Operator's Licensing Meetings. These meetings are being scheduled to provide 
information on the application of insecticides, fungicides, nematocides, and herbicides. De- 
tails on the new custom spray operator's licensing law may be found in the March Agricultural 
Releases in the Custom Spray Manual , The meetings are scheduled as follows. 

April 4 - Carbondale, Muckleroy Auditorium 

Ag, Sci. Bldg. at SIU 

5 - Effingham, K. C, Hall 

6 - Bloomington, Hayden Auditorium 

Metcalf Elem, School, University Street 

7 - Galesburg, Farm Bureau Hall 

8 - DeKalb, Farm Bureau Hall 

The schools will be from 9:00 - 2:30 and the examination will follow the training session. 
Interested persons or applicants are welcome to attend. 

RLC 

In-Service Courses Scheduled. One course has been definitely scheduled as follows: 
Date Course Place Section S tarting Time 



April 16 Small Engines Teutopolis 20 8:30 a.m. 

Teachers in this section will be notified directly. If you are outside the section and wish to 
attend, please notify Vocational Agriculture Service. 

RFE 

Cattle Feeders Day will be held on April 14 at the University Auditorium. The morning session 
includes reports by the beef division staff on gain efficiency of cattle fed to different market 
weights, experiences with urea, fortifying corn silage with non-protein nitrogen, feeding all 
concentrate rations, controlling insects on beef cattle, and present status of vitamin A. The 
afternoon session includes presentations on the beef cattle of tomorrow contest, and a panel 
of feeders discussing why we feed cattle the way we do. 

If you are interested in a copy of the printed program, please let us know and we will get you 
one. All teachers and/or students are welcome to attend. , 

NEW BOOKS 



The following have been added to our library since the last 
issue of the AIDS. All of our books are available for re- 
view in our office by thossinterested. As long as the edi- 
tions are current, they will be included in such exhibits as 
the one at the Annual Conference of Vocational Agriculture 
Teachers. 



RAFTER LAYOUT WITH THE FRAMING SQUARE FOR SCHOOL AND HOME WORKSHOP Bear 
and Hoe me r, 1966. $1.50 (quantity discount), Ho bar Publications, 1305 Tiller Lane, St. Paul, 
Minn. 

The following is quoted from the introduction: 

'This manual on rafter layout and construction procedures has been written for the 
vocational agriculture instructor, the 4-H project leader, and the home handyman. 
This booklet, containing the step-by-step procedures snould also be used by the 
high school student and 4-H club member. The booklet contains facts and expla- 
nations on how to use the framing square as well as the basic principles involved." 

AIDS, April 1966 -3- 



H" 



3 



HI 



i 




AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION / COLLEGE OF EDUCATION / UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Agricultural Education Club Elects. Junior officers were 


elected at the March 3 meeting of 


the Agricultural Education Club, 


Elected to take office in 


September 


of this year were: 


Name 


Office 




Home 


Jack Stork 


President 




Sparta 


Dennis O'Connor 


Vice-President 




Tolono 


Larry Greenwood 


Secretary 




Coffeen 


Roger Smith 


Treasurer 




Findlay 


George Young 


Reporter 




Auburn 


Harlan Hoff 


Agriculture Council 


Thomson 




Representative 







These young men are to be congratulated on the faith the membership of the club has shown in 
them. 

AHK 

Placement Report . As of March 10, 1966, there were 18 high school vocational agriculture 
and four junior college vacancies listed with the placement office. 

NDE 

Alpha Tau Alpha Initiation. On March 13 Alpha Tau Alpha, professional honorary fraternity, 
initiated 22 students. The banquet was in the Illini Union Colonial Room and initiation 
ceremonies were in the General Lounge. The names of the new members, their home high 
schools, and vocational agriculture teachers are: 



Name 

Allaman, Gail 
Carleton, James 
Carnes, Gregg 
Croft, John 
Dow, Robert 
Greenwood, Larry 
Hoff, Harlan 
Huschle, Don 
Johnson, Steven 
Kennedy, Jack 
Leman, Philip 
Landes, Phil 
Maybe rry, Gerald 
Rayburn, Charles 
Riffey, Ron 
Schoney, Ed 



High School 

Roseville 

Broadlands 

Pittsfield 

Leaf River 

Flora 

Mulberry Grove 

(York Comm.) Thomson 

(Cathedral) Belleville 

Newark 

Seneca 

Roanoke 

Paris, Brocton 

Norris City 

Champaign 

Virden 

Lena 



Teacher 

Don Coordes 
B. R. Littlefield 
Charles Fisher 
Wilbert Asbury 
G. S. Zimmerman 
Russell Weger 
William Gengenbach 

George Richter 
Sherwood Jackson 

H. Dean Jensen 
Jerry Kuykendall 
J. A. Twardock 
James Corgan 
Carl Miller 



(continued) 



AIDS, April 1966 



(continued) 



Name 

Schoonover, Dale 
Smith, Roger 
Stevens, James 
Taylor, Dick 
Whitson, David 
Young, George 



High School 

Louisville 

Findlay 

(Central) Camp Point 

Catlin 

Nauvoo 

Auburn 



Teacher 

Grove r Burkett 
Jerry Kuykendall 

Gordon Combs 

Mervin Mixer 

Mo V.. Heiderscheid 



PEH 

Participated in Central Regional Conference. Shaw Terwilliger, teacher of agriculture at 
Virginia, recently participated in a panel discussion at the Central Regional Conference in 
Chicago o This region is composed of 13 states in the central part of the United States. 
Mr. Terwilliger and other members of the panel, from Minnesota and Ohio, discussed the 
efforts they are making to provide vocational education in agriculture for disadvantaged youth. 

GRF 

1966 Summer Session . The 1966 summer program in agricultural education will emphasize 
the "new" program of agricultural education in high schools and junior colleges. The dates 
for the four-week session are June 20 to July 15. Plan now to attend, making your course 
selections from the following: 

Votec 459 (G) Workshop in Curriculum Development — Ornamental Horticulture 
(iunit) 1-3 MTWTF. .... Hemp 

Votec 459 (H) Workshop in Curriculum Development — Agricultural Business 
and Industry (iunit), 1-3 TWTF. .... Warmbrod 



Votec 473 

Votec 474 

Votec 476 

Hp Ed 305 
Ed Psy 311 



Vocational Education in Agriculture for Adults (i unit), 
8-10 TWTF. .... Fuller 

Supervised Agricultural Experience in Vocational Agriculture 
(I unit), 3-5 TWTF. .... Phipps 

Guidance in Agricultural Education (i unit), 10-12 TWTF 
..... Krebs 



History of Educational Ideas (|unit), 10-12 TWTF., . . . 

Psychology of Learning for Teachers (^ unit), 1-3 TWTF 
..... Jones 



Willers 



Se Ed 448 Adult Education (| or 1 unit), 1-3 TWTF. .... Anderson 

Ag Econ 332 Livestock Marketing (3/4 or 1 unit), 10-12 MTWTF 
..... Broadbent 

Agron301 Soil Fertility (\ unit) , 8-10 MTWTF Kurtz 

An Sci 305 Genetics and Animal Improvement (^unit), 1-3 MTWT 
.... DeFries and Touchberry 

Rural Soc 477 Rural Community Organization and Development (1 unit), 10-12 
MTWT, ..... Lindstrom 



JRW 



AIDS, April 1966 



-2- 



VQTE C 47 4, Sup ervis ed A gricultural Experience in V ocationa l Agriculture, to Distric t I Next 
Fall . Votec 474 will be available to District I teachers the first semester of 1966-67. The 
course will be offered in two sections The section for the northern part of the district will be 
offered on Tuesday evenings; and the section for the south ern part of the district will be offered 
on M^inasdajL evenings 

The course description is as follows: 'Supervised agricultural experience programs as an 
educational strategy; planning, conducting, supervising, and evaluating agricultural experience 
programs; relation of supervised agricultural experience programs to establishment and 
advancement in an occupation; keeping and using records " \ Unit. This is the course used 
to qualify teachers of agriculture to conduct cooperative education programs in agriculture 

Teachers interested are asked to send a postcard, stating that they plan to enroll by June 1, 
1956, to: 

A H Krebs 
356 Education Building 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 

AHK 



AIDS. April 1966 -3- 




I f- 



NEWS 



ri v^ 



ILLINOIS ASSN. OF VO-AG TEACHERS 



I am enclosing a report from Mr. Ralph Guthrie, Chief of Agricultural Education, 
Springfield, regarding the Illinois High School Association sanction of FFA and vocational 
agriculture activities, Included are excerpts from a letter to him from Mr. Albeit Willis 
of the I.H.S.A. 

By now all teachers are probably aware of the contents of the report, since adminis- 
trators were informed of the action in a periodical put out by the I.H.S.A. to school adminis- 
trators Ma,rch 1, Please check with administrators to see if they are aware of this action, 

IHSA SANCTION OF FFA AND VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE ACTIVITIES — 

A concerted effort is being made to schedule all contests and activities, which involve 
high school students, at a time which will not conflict with the regular school day. Pursuant 
to this effort, we have been asked by the Illinois High School Association to cooperate by 
scheduling FFA and Vocational Agriculture activities at a time when school is not in session. 
All sections in the state are already cooperating in this respect. Many sections have no 
activities or contests on school time. Saturday or evening time is being used. Other sections 
are making plans to eliminate any conflict with school time. 

Occasionally, the nature of the contest or the situation under which it will be conducted 
makes it almost imperative that it be conducted partly on school time. The contests most 
affected are the Land Use Selection and the Livestock Judging Contests. Consequently, we 
contacted the Illinois High School Association concerning the sanctioning of these activities. 

In our contact with Mr, Willis, we agreed to encourage the teachers to "hold the line" 
on the Sectional Land Use Selection and Livestock Judging contests and other activities which 
are presently being held on Saturday or at other times when school is not in session. May 
we solicit your cooperation. 



The following are excerpts from a letter dated January 31, 
concerning the board action taken on these contests: 



1966 from Mr. Albert Willis 



'The Board fully recognized the importance of field trips and related 
activities in connection with Land Use and Livestock Judging. The members 
were, however, of the unanimous opinion that insofar as possible, inter- 
scholastic contests of all kinds should be held at times when they would not 
require the participating students and teachers to be absent from their regular 
classroom activities. 



AIDS, April 1966 



"The Board voted to authorize me to sanction Sectional Land Use 
and Livestock Judging contests held under the following conditions: 

1. That no more than one Sectional Land Use contest and one 
Sectional Livestock Judging contest shall be held during a 
school year. 

2. That no Sectional Land Use or Livestock Judging contest 
shall begin earlier than 1:00 P.M. on a school day. 

3. That in the sections where Land Use and Livestock Judging 
contests are held on a school day, no participating student 
or teacher shall request or be granted permission to be 
absent from regular classroom work scheduled prior to 
1:00 P.M. that day. 

"It is the desire of both the Board and I to cooperate in every possible 
way with the Vocational Education Division but because of the strong feelings 
which school administrators have regarding the use of school time for inter- 
scholastic contests, it is of the utmost importance that we have your coopera- 
tion in the supervision and administration of the Sectional Land Use and Live- 
stock Judging contests." 

Section 13 News 

Twelve ag teachers from Section 13 completed Vo. Tec. 474 at Mt. Sterling this winter 
under the capable instruction of Drs. Phipps and Hemp. 

National officers of the FFA were in Quincy on Feb. 24 for a panel discussion for the 
benefit of 300 FFA boys and advisors from the area. It was held at the Holiday Inn and was a 
National FFA Week feature. The officers were hosted by the Moorman Mfg. Company. 
Several schools from Section 13 had representation on the panel. 

Raymond Dunn 

Section 13 

Public Relations Officer 

Following is a report of the judging contest committee dealing with the state livestock 
judging contest. 

When this report was presented to the executive board at their Chicago meeting they 
took action to adopt the report as you see it . 

This means that the recommendations will be followed at our June contest this year. 

Further details will be in the judging contest rules that will be sent to all ag teachers 
in the near future, according to Harold Witt. 

Your editor feels that the committee has come up with some excellent recommenda- 
tions, and that they are to be commended. 



AIDS, April 1966 -2- 



IAYA1 COMMITTEE MEETING ON CONTESTS AJ ARDS 

The Committee met at the IVA Convention in Chicago, Illinois on March 11, 1966, 
The following recommendations were made: 

1, Replace ring of sheep with ring of young boars with litter information, 

2. That purple ribbons, with word "Superior" printed on it, be given to top ten students in each 
division and also to top ten teams in each division 

3 That all vo-ag departments be surveyed this fall to determine inter - m Mechanics 
Contest on state level. 

4 That 10 slaughter hogs be used for grading with live hog evaluation card based on percentage 
of lean cuts to live weight Final placings will be made on carcass This cla - - ill replace 
grading of ten hogs based on U.S. grades. 

5 That production class of gilts be substituted for ring of s - Use data from litter wl 
include back fat probe, growth rate and size of litter. 

Orville BottrelL Chairman 
Ray He:: Seers 
Stanley Kl 
Henry Slinker 
H C. Hendren 
O C Floyd 
W H. W 
. , . 

There will again be an Exchange -of -Ideas contest and displa I _ Ag - ..ice 

Shop and Storage building during June Conference The cor ill be divided into two cate- 

gories as follows: 

1) Field and Shop Aids 
2 1 Classroom Ai - 

Three prizes will be awarded in each class An entry blank is included in this issue 
of the AIDS Please make your entry early Send entries to Vo, Ag, Service. Send plans or 
type material for the display so they can be reproduced Send t th your entry. 

The contest will be judged by the Special Projects Committee — Tom Phelps, Plymouth, 
is chairman 

The Production Credit Association will again be our hosts at breakfast on Thursday, 
June 9 at 7:30 a m in the Illini Room. Union Building. U si :>f Hlinc;:; 

Each teacher will receive a special imitation by mail prior to the June Conference 

H. M. Strubinger is chairman of the program planning committee for June Conference 
I believe an excellent program will be in store for you a: r.nual IAVAT Conferer. 

June 8-10 Keynote speaker will be Mr Homer Edwards. Field Representative. U S Office 
of Education Chicago. Illinois Gerald Page, Region IV NVATA vice president from Nix 
Missouri, will also be en the program 

AIDS. April 1966 



Those of us in attendance at the IVA Convention in Chicago were treated to an excellent 
program at the ag section arranged by John Baker, vice-presidents 

At the morning session a panel composed of Mr. Leo Deutsch, International Harvester, 
Mr Robert Swan, F S ; Dr. Lloyd Phipps U of I- ; Dr. Eugene Wood, SIU, and Ralph Guthrie, 
Chief, Agricultural Education, Springfield, discussed "Training Needed for Post -High Teaching " 

The afternoon session opened with a talk by Mr_ Irvin B Johnson. Chicago Board of 
Trade on "Urban-Rural Relations," 

Also on the afternoon program was a panel composed of Don Rodgers, Huntley: 
Don Higgs, Streator; Don Kaufman, Morris; Dale Smith, Erie; and Roland Meyer, Cissna Park 
They discussed "Progress of New Programs." 

The IAVAT Judging Contest Committee has completed a survey of sectional judging 
contests They have received replies from 22 sections Mr Stanley Klaus has provided me 
with a summary of the conclusions of this survey. I thought it might be of interest and value 
to IAVAT members, so I am running it in this issue of the newsletter, I might add that this 
committee has been most active and productive, and should be commended 

ILLINOIS JUDGING CONTEST SURVEY 1966 

Conclusions of 22 Surveys returned: 

1 17 sections have livestock judging or 77 .27% 
17 sections have 90% of the school participate 
17 sections have 1842 boys participate 

2, None have only a grading livestock contest 

3 . 10 sections have livestock judging and grading 45,45% 
10 sections have 85% of the schools participate 
10 sections have 890 boys participate 

4, 17 sections have dairy judging or 77 ,27% 

17 sections have 85% of the school participate 
17 sections have 1459 boys participate 

5 1 section has milk products with dairy judging 

6 2 sections have meats judging 

2 sections have 82% of the schools participate 
2 sections have 320 boys participate 

7 , 9 sections have grain and crops Judging Contest or 42 85% 

9 sections have 64 3% of the schools participate 
9 sections have 431 boys participate 

8 5 sections have Poultry Judging Contest or 22.7% 

5 sections have 47% of the schools participate 

5 sections have 139 boys participate 

(continued) 

AIDS, April 1966 -4- 



9 21 sections have Soil Selection Contest or 95,45% 
21 sections have 82% schools participate 
21 sections have 1801 boys participate 

10 3 sections have Farm Shop Skills Contest 13.6% 
3 sections have 65% schools participate 
3 sections have 164 boys participate 

11 , Of the 9 sections that have a grain and crop contest: 
88. 88% use crop seed identification 
9 00% use crop plant identification 
66.66% use weed seed identification 
18 o 18% use weed plant identification 
100% use hay selection 
31 8% use silage selection 
66.66% use small leg seed selection 
66 66 use small grass seed selection 
100% use oats seed for selection 
88 . 8% use wheat seed for selection 
100% use soybean seed for selection 
88 . 8% use market corn 
None use seed corn 

12 Of the 17 sections holding a livestock Judging and Grade Contest: 
14 sections use breeding sheep 
None use Prod Tested Boars 
None use Prod. Tested Bulls 

10 sections use fat lambs 

9 sections use feeder pigs 

11 sections use feeder cattle 

14 sections use slaughter cattle 

12 sections use slaughter hogs 

13 Of 14 sections that hold a Dairy Judging Contest: 
2 sections use dairy bulls 
14 sections use dairy with Production Records 

14. One section conducts a Tractor Operators Contest 

15 One section conducts a Surveying Contest 

16 One section conducts a Small Motors Contest 

17 One section includes Dressed birds grading and egg judging in their 
Poultry Contest 

18 Three Farm Shop Skills contests all include: 

1) Tractors 

2) Electricity 

3) Welding 

4) Carpentry 

****** 

AIDS.. April 1966 -5- 



Mr, Clyde E. Fry, Clinton vocational agriculture teacher, has announced his retire- 
ment, effective July 1 Since his record is of such great length and of such an outstanding 
nature. I thought I would run a story on him in this newsletter, 

Clyde has served as an inspiration to your editor for many years. The retirement 
of such a dedicated man will be a great loss to vocational agriculture.. We wish him continued 
health and happiness. 

Clyde has served as a high school teacher for 41 years, 39 of these in vo. ag, He 
started departments of vo, ag, at Minier, Polo, and Clinton. He is a past president of 
IAVAT and was a speaker on the program of the ag. section at the AVA Convention in 
San Antonio, Texas, in 1936. At this convention he presented Mr. J. E. Hill a life member- 
ship to the AVA in behalf of the IAVAT . 

Mr. Fry received the Honorary American Farmer Degree in 1954, the first year it 
was awarded on the "point system." He is a "charter advisor" of FFA, since he was teaching 
at Minier when FFA started in Illinois. Mr. William Kuhfuss, now president of the Illinois 
Agricultural Association, was first president of the Minier chapter. 

Clyde has B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Illinois and lists membership 
in Alpha Zeta, Alpha Tau Alpha, Kappa Delta Pi and Delta Sigma Rho fraternities 

Looking into his record we find Clyde has had five state championship judging teams, 
three in fatstock and two in grain; four state champion individual judges, two in fatstock and 
two in grain; 42 state farmers, five American Farmers, one Star State Farmer, three 
Sectional Star Farmers, eight State FFA officers, including President Glyndon Stuff and 
Secretary-Treasurer Ivan Heiser. 

Mr, Fry was advisor to Glyndon Stuff, the first National FFA president from Hlinois. 

Perhaps you think of Clyde Fry as "Mr. Public Speaking Himself." He has had four 
state champions and four second-place winners in public speaking. He has taken an entry 
through to the state finals 14 times. He boasts 20 sectional winners. He had a contestant in 
the first state contest in 1930 and has had a sectional entry 34 different years since that time. 

ENTRY BLANK - IAVAT E XC H AN GE - -O F - -ID E AS CONTEST 

I propose to display the following item(s) in the IAVAT Exchange-of -Ideas Contest at the 
June Conference: 

Class 1 — Field and Shop Aids 



Class 2 — Classroom Aids 



Signed School 



Return this entry blank to Vocational Agriculture Service, 434 Mumford Hall, Urbana, before 
May 15, 1966. Include plans or copy if you wish to have them duplicated for distribution 

AIDS, April 1966 -6- 



(tear sheet) 

TO: 

Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 

Please send the following items: 

Number Price* Amount Item 

$ 15 Calendar of Events 

10 Beef Cattle Management Suggestions 



. 10 Beef Cattle Feeding Suggestions 

73 Slidefilm 439 -"Using the Level to Stake Out a Building Site" 

3 45 Slidefilm 498 -"Using Power Lawn Mowers Safely" (color) 



*Prices do not include postage 






Name School 

Address 

Billing 



AIDS, April 1966 



INDEX TO ITEMS IN VO-AG SERVICE SECTION 

JPage_ 



A Description and Source Listing of Professional 

Information in Agricultural Education . ....... . . . 

Beef Cattle Management Suggestions and Beef Cattle Feeding Suggestions . . . . 2 

Calendar of Events , 1966-67 . . ...... . . . . 1 

Cattle Feeders' Day . . . 3 

Crop Seed Samples ... ...... ...........,,, 1 

Custom Spray Operators' Licensing Meetings .... ........... 3 

First Shipment of New Units . . ............ . . . . 1 

In-Service Courses Scheduled ... . ..... 3 

Livestock Marketing Field Day ... . . .......... 2 

New Books ............ ............. 3 

New Bulletins and Circulars ............ ........ 1 

New Slidefilms . 2 

Order Form for Agricultural Releases, etc.. 1 

Veterinary Medicine Open House . . 1 

Visuals in Agricultural Releases . 1 



AIDS, April 1966 



PRICE LIST OF FEEDS- 

The feed prices for many of the feedstuffs used in vocational agriculture projects are listed 
below. This list is meant to be used as a basis of values for all boys obtaining their feed at 
home, Feed purchased should be recorded at prices paid 

Kind of fee d Mar. 15 

Corn, shelled, bu, . . . . , $ 1.16 

Corn, ground shelled or ear corn, bu , , . . . . 1,26 

Oats, bu . . . . , , . ,67 

Oats, ground, bu ....... .... .............. .77 

Barley, (feed) bu., „ . . . ....,..,, .. , . , ,. .90 

Barley, ground or rolled, bu ... . , . . . . 1,00 

Grain sorghum, cwt. , ....................... 1 90 

Grain sorghum, cracked, cwt. , . . . , . 2.00 

Skim and buttermilk, cwt 1.50 

Whole milk, Grade B, cwt ... ... . 3.00 

Corn silage, ton . . ........ ...... 9,50 

Sorghum silage, ton ......... ......... .... 8.50„ , 

Haylage, ton . , 14.50- 

Clover and mixed hav) .... n . ............. 24.00 

Alfalfa ") All hay and straw prices ......... . 25 .50 

Timothy are for baled. Figure 

Oat or wheat straw loose at $5 less per ton. lg QQ 



— Prepared in cooperation with the Department of Agricultural Economics 

2/ 

— Or convert to dry hay equivalent containing 90 percent dry matter 



AIDS, April 1966 



VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE SERVICE 

Unlvaralty of UHnoli - Call*?* sf Agricultur* 

434 MUMFORD HALL • URBANA, ILLINOIS 






SERIALS DEPARTMENT 
UNIV Oi ILL LIBRARY 



SSHL 









CocZ. 



y* 



VO-AG AIDS 









! I if n 



s 



Volume 24, Number 10 
May 1966 



MAY 2 7 1 



luued jolnHy by 
Vocational Agriculture Service, College of Agriculture 

and 

Agricultural Education Division, College of Education 

University of Illinois 

In Cooperation with 

Illinois State Board of Vocational Education 



VO-AG SERVICE 

Announcements & Notes 



Billing for Agricultural Releases and Advance Orders . As soon as we can calculate the cost 
of the May Agricultural Releases, we will send out statements for the 1965-66 Releases, 
advance order units, and advance order slidefilms. We will also add to the statement any 
open account charges that have accumulated since the last billing. Accompanying the state- 
ment will be a multilithed letter giving more detail about these charges than can be put on 
the statement. Please certify these charges promptly and submit the statement to the proper 
school authority for payment. If you have any questions or did not receive any of the items 
for which you are charged, please let us know. 

JWM 

Final Shipment of Agricultural Releases , The final shipment of Agricultural Releases for the 
year (May issue) may be delayed somewhat waiting for assembly of the new units. It is diffi- 
cult to say how much delay there will be at this time (April 20) but we will get Releases to you 
as soon as possible. „,.. 

a W iVl 

Final Shipment of New Unit s. The final shipment of new subject-matter units will be made soon 
after May AIDS and Agricultural Releases have been sent. One copy of each of the new units is 
included in May Agricultural Releases, These new units will then be available for anyone who 
wishes to purchase them and are listed for your convenience on the tear sheet at the end of this 

issue of the AIDS, tit™* 

JWM 

New Bulletins an d Circulars. Five new publications have been received since the last issue of 
the AIDS. They are: 

Cir. 925 Insect Pests of Cattle 10£ 

Cir. 930 Flowering Annuals for Sun and Shade IOC 

Cir. 931 Planning for a Better Community Landscape, IOC 

Cir. 932 Using Preemergence Herbicides, IOC 

Cir. 933 ABC'S of County Government, 15£ 

Bui. 716 Controlling Root -Feeding Insects of Corn, 25£ 

Copies of the five circulars were included in May Agricultural Releases. BuL 716 was not 
included because of its technical nature, Prices shown are for quantity distribution out-of - 

state. Illinois teachers may order in the usual manner. t^?™ 

J JWM 

Return of Surveying Kits . A special letter is going to the teachers in charge of surveying kits 
asking them to arrange to have the kit brought in to the June Conference. If you are driving a. 
station wagon and have room, you may wish to volunteer to pick up the kit and bring it in from 
your section. If so, please contact the teacher in charge in your section. 

JWM 

Replacement Lens for Plastic Face Masks . We anticipate that some of you who have purchased 
the plastic mask safety goggles may wish to replace the lens before next year. We have obtain- 
ed a quotation on them and will order a supply if there is a demand for them. They will be 
priced at 60^ each, plus postage. This item is included on the tear sheet for your convenience. 
If we receive sufficient orders in time, we will try to have them in stock by Conference time. 

JWM 
AIDS, May 1966 -1- 



Housing for June Conference, We have been informed that, due to final examinations con- 
tinuing through June 8, there will be no space available in University dormitories for 
teachers attending the June Conference, June 8-10. We have made tentative arrangements 
with the Ag„ fraternities and cooperative houses, and information about these is contained 
on a special insert going with copies of the AIDS addressed to Illinois teachers. Also 
enclosed is a list of local hotels, motels and some private accommodations, We URGE 
you to make your reservation at once so that you will be assured of a place to stay 

JWM 

Judging Rules , Judging rules for the 1965-66 contests were mailed on April 1, If you did 
not receive your copy, please let us know and we will send you another one. 

Please note the changes in the Livestock contest. They are as follows- 

1. The production ring of sows has been replaced with a ring of 5^- to 6- 
month-old gilts with litter data. 

2. One ring of sheep has been replaced with a ring of 5g- to 6 -month -old 
boars with litter and growth data. 

3. The grading ring of market hogs has been changed to a live hog 
evaluation of 10 market hogs on the percentage of four lean cuts 
to live weight, Please note the sample card as shown on page 8 
of the rules. 

Some additional information on the evaluation ring has been prepared and is being included 
with copies of the VO-AG AIDS going to Illinois vocational agriculture instructors. Others 
that are interested may get a copy by requesting it from Vocational Agriculture Service. 

Further information on swine evaluation may be obtained from the June Conference course 
by that title. Prof. Carlisle will try to show animals in the different percentage groups 
and explain his reasoning in the course. If you are interested in this phase of judging, you 
may want to consider this when registering for the courses, 

WHW 

Meat and Milk Judging Co n test . About 50 schools participated in the Meat and Milk Judging 
Contest on April 2, Wenona was the winner of the Meats contest and will represent Illinois 
at the national contest at Kansas City on October 12, Shelbyville won the Milk contest and 
will participate in the national at Waterloo, Iowa on September 23, 

The top ten teams and individuals and their scores in Meat were as follows- 

Teams 



Wenona 


1022 


Shelbyville 


1007 


Farmer City 


981 


Rock Falls 


980 


Orangeville 


967 


Hillsboro 


949 


Lawrenceville 


948 


Sterling 


948 


Roc he lie 


933 


Virginia 


930) 


Clinton 


930) tie 


Joliet 


930) 



AIDS, May 1966 -2- 



Individuals 

Terry Reiterman, Virginia 349 

Buster Eversole, Shelbyville 346 

Bill Baker, Wenona 345 

Bill Niehaus, Hillsboro 342 

Len Corzine, Assumption 341 

Ron Monroe, Fairbury 340 

Steve Bailey, Farmer City 340 

Dan O'Brien, Wenona 339 

Don Nelson, Wenona 338 

Melvin Betts, Rock Falls 337) 

Bill Rutledge, Farmer City 337) tie 

Scotts Niemann, Hillsboro 337) 

The top ten teams and individuals and their scores in Milk were as follows: 

Teams 



Shelbyville 


113 


Sterling 


195 


Bismarck 


198 


Joliet 


219 


Assumption 


223 


Geneseo 


235 


Tonica 


236 


Rock Falls 


246 


Arthur 


258 


Forrest 


265 


Individuals 



Darrell Gregg , Shelbyville 
Robert Hudson, Shelbyville 
Terry Reedy, Shelbyville 
Arlyn Johnson, Sterling 
Gregg Kane, Cullom 
Earl Lindsey, Bismarck 
Keith Hinrichs, Milledgeville 
Jim Philippart, Lockport 
Dennis Throne, Assumption 
Larry Ebersole, Sterling 



31 

34 
48 
50 
54 
56 
62 
62 
62 
62 



WHW 



Weed Cont ro l -Visuals , A set of 24 visuals on controlling weeds in corn and soybeans was 
included in the May Agricultural Releases, These are 85 x 11 inch instructional illustrations 
for use in making overhead projection transparencies, for direct use with an opaque projector, 
or for use as charts, For those who did not get them in Agricultural Releases, this packet of 
visuals is available at a cost of 50<p plus postage, They are included on the tear sheet 

RLC 



Approved Practices— Alfalfa and Com - Revised^ Single copies of these 4 -page revisions 
were included in the May Agricultural Releases. Quantity copies are available at 4£ each, 
plus postage. It is listed on the tear sheet with the other revised approved practices that 
were previously announced. 



RLC 



AIDS, May 1966 



FFA Roadside Signs . New aluminum FFA roadside slogan signs are still on hand for the 
following schools: 

Beason St, Elmo 

Dwight Somonauk 

Edwardsville Southwestern (Piasa) 

Gibson City Sparland 

Havana Spoon River Falley (Fairview) 

Macon Wapella 

Metropolis Wesclin (Trenton) 

Newton Williamsfield 

Northwestern (Palmyra) Yorkwood (Little York) 

Olney 

They may be picked up at Conference time or before, or we will send them if you authorize 
us to do so. Please be sure to return old signs if you have not done so. 

We have requests on file for replacement and new sets for next school year from the 
following: 

Byron Magnolia-Swaney 

Chandlerville Mid-County (Varna) 

Century (Ullin) Mt. Pulaski 

Dakota Northwestern (Sciota) 

Geneseo Paxton 

Gibson City Pontiac 

Huntley Tri-City (Buffalo) 

Jacksonville West Pike (Kinderhook) 

If your chapter would like a set of signs for next year, please send in your request, using 
the special tear sheet, We will add your chapter to the above list and present it to the 
Board of Trustees, Illinois Foundation FFA, at their summer meeting when they budget 
funds for this purpose. TWM 

Veterinary Medicine Open House , This is a reminder of the Veterinary Medicine Open House 
at the University of Illinois to be held May 6-7, 1966. A program and other information 
concerning the open house was sent to you with the April AIDS, 

WHW 

Agricultural Release a n d Advance Or d er Form , An order form for 1966-67 Agricultural 

Releases and other Advance Order materials was included in the April Agricultural Releases: 

This month, one is included in the AIDS. Please note deadline date is October 1, 1966 but 

order can be sent in anytime before that, .,,„, 

J JWM 

Future Demands for Teachers of Vocat ional Agr iculture. Dean K E. Gardner called our 
attention to the efforts of the AVA committee on Professional Personnel Recruitment that 
is studying the critical shortage of teachers. Details of this committee's report and recom- 
mendation is found on page 3 of the LAV AT news. This is a matter of intense concern to the 
profession and we are assured of Dean Gardner's cooperation in any effort to solve the problem. 

JWM 

Spotlight. A copy of 'The Spotlight," a publication of Alpha Tau Alpha and the Agricultural 
Education Club at the University of Illinois, is included in May Agricultural Releases, This 
may be of interest to your students, particularly those who may be considering a career in 
agricultural education. t\vm 

AIDS, May 1966 -4- 



Presentations from Swine Day and Cattle Feeders' Day . Copies of the presentations made 
at each of these days on the campus of the University of Illinois were included in the May 
Agricultural Releases. If you did not receive a copy and wish one, there are a few remain- 
ing and available on request. Quantity copies are not available. 



wm 



Designs for Nailed Trusses. This set of plans prepared by Midwest Plan Service was in- 
cluded in May Agricultural Releases. Additional copies are available at $1.00 per copy. 
Readers in other states should order from the Department of Agricultural Engineering at 
their state university. Illinois readers may order from our office. 



JWT\ 



NEW BOOKS 



The following have been added to our library since the last 
issue of the AIDS. All of our books are available for re- 
view in our office by those interested. As long as the edi- 
tions are current, they will be included in such exhibits as 
the one at the Annual Conference of Vocational Agriculture 
Teachers. 



TRACTOR HYDRAULICS 1966. $1. 50 (quantity discount). American Association for 
Agricultural Engineering and Vocational Agriculture . Agricultural Engineering Building, 
Athens, Georgia. 

This publication was issued jointly by the Farm and Industrial Equipment 
Institute and the American Association for Agricultural Engineering and 
Vocational Agriculture. It has 48 pages, 57 illustrations, three colors 
and is 8|"x 11" in size. It explains the simple scientific principles in- 
volved in a hydraulic system, discusses the principles as applied to tractor 
hydraulics, the merits of different types of hydraulic pumps and valves, 
the types of hydraulic cylinders and how they work. 

THE TRACTOR ELECTRICAL SYSTEM 1966. $2. 00 (quantity discount). American 
Association for Agricultural Engineering and Vocational Agriculture. Agricultural 
Engineering Building, Athens, Georgia. 

This publication, also prepared jointly by FIEI and the American Association 
contains 64 pages, 105 illustrations, three colors and is 8|"x 11" in size. 
It is a practical presentation of electricity as it applies to the tractor 
ignition system, the starter, the generator and the storage battery. Alter- 
nators and transistorized regulators are included in the discussion. 

BALL AND ROLLER BEARINGS 1966. $. 50 (quantity discount). American Association 
for Agricultural Engineering and Vocational Agriculture. Agricultural Engineering 
Building, Athens, Georgia. 

This publication, also prepared jointly by FIEI and the American Association 
contains 32 pages, 80 illustrations, 1 color, and is 85" x 11" in size. It 
deals with bearings commonly found on farm equipment, discusses their 
capabilities and limitations for use with thrust, radial or combination loads 
and the effects of misalignment. It includes classifications of ball and roller 
bearings, bearing removal and installation, maintenance and lubrication 
procedures and causes of bearing failures. Detailed illustrations make the 
information clear and easily understood. 

AIDS, May 1966 -5- 






I 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION / COLLEGE OF EDUCATION / UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Ornamental Horticulture Summer Institute . A summer institute to upgrade the competency 
of teachers in the area of vocational ornamental horticulture will be held at the University 
of Illinois during the summer of 1966. The institute is a part of a training proposal funded 
by the U. S. Office of Education under the provisions of Section 4(c) of the Vocational Educa- 
tion Act of 1963 . 

The institute will include four weeks of instruction in ornamental horticulture and curriculum 
development,, Participants will be enrolled in Ornamental Horticulture 200c and Votec 459. 
Stipends amounting to $300 for subsistence and additional amounts to pay for travel expendi- 
tures, tuition and fees will be awarded to teachers who are selected for the institute. 

The Institute Selection Committee will give top priority to teachers who plan to teach a voca- 
tional ornamental horticulture course or to incorporate instructional units in ornamental 
horticulture in their regular vocational programs during the 1966-67 school year. 



After reviewing the applications and making the final selections , 
mittee will notify applicants of action taken about May 15, 1966. 



the Institute Selection Com- 



PEH 



Votec 474, Supervised Agricultural Experience in Vocational Agriculture, to District I Ne xt 
Fall. Votec 474 will be available to District I teachers the first semester of 1966-67 . The 
course will be offered in two sections. The section for the northern part of the district will 
be offered on Tuesday evenings; and the section for the southern part of the district will be 
offered on Wednesday evenings. 

The course description is as follows: 'Supervised agricultural experience programs as an 
educational strategy; planning, conducting, supervising, and evaluating agricultural experi- 
ence programs; relation of supervised agricultural experience programs to establishment 
and advancement in an occupation; keeping and using records." \ unit. This is the course 
used to qualify teachers of agriculture to conduct cooperative education programs in agriculture. 



Teachers interested are asked to send a postcard, stating that they plan to enroll to: 

A. H. Krebs 
356 Education Building 
University of Illinois 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



AHK 



Placement Report , As of April 5, 1966, there were 31 vacancies for high school teachers of 
vocational agriculture and six vacancies for junior college teachers of vocational agriculture 
in Illinois. There are 18 candidates at the University of Illinois who will qualify to teach voca- 
tional agriculture in June. 

NDE 



AIDS, May 1966 



1966 Summer Session , The 1966 summer program in agricultural education will emphasize 
the "new" program of agricultural education in high schools and junior colleges. The dates 
for the four-week session are June 20 to July 15. Plan now to attend, making your course 
selections from the following: 

Votec 459 (G) Workshop in Curriculum Development — Ornamental Horticulture 
(i unit) 1-3 MTWTF. . . . . Hemp 

Votec 459 (H) Workshop in Curriculum Development — Agricultural Business 
and Industry (i unit) , 1-3 TWTF. . . . . Warmbrod 



Votec 473 

Votec 474 

Votec 476 
Hp Ed 305 
Ed Psy 311 
Se Ed 448 
Ag Econ 332 
Agron 301 
An Sci 305 



Vocational Education in Agriculture for Adults (h unit), 
8-10 TWTF. . . . . Fuller 

Supervised Agricultural Experience in Vocational Agriculture 
(iunit), 3-5 TWTF. .... Phipps 

Guidance in Agricultural Education (|unit) s 10-12 TWTF. .... Krebs 

History of Educational Ideas (f unit), 10-12 TWTF. .... Willers 

Psychology of Learning for Teachers (J unit), 1-3 TWTF. .... Jones 

Adult Education (J or 1 unit), 1-3 TWTF. .... Anderson 

Livestock Marketing (3/4 or 1 unit), 10-12 MTWTF, .... Broadbent 

Soil Fertility (iunit), 8-10 MTWTF. .... Kurtz 

Genetics and Animal Improvement (| unit) 1-3 MTWT 
..... DeFries and Touchberry 



Rural Soc 477 Rural Community Organization and Development (1 unit), 10-12 
MTWT. .... Lindstrom 



JRW 



Honored for Scholastic Achievement . Gamma Sigma Delta, Honor Society in Agriculture, 
recently held a recognition meeting for junior students in the College of Agriculture who had 
outstanding scholastic averages. Among those honored were; 



Nam e 
John L. Abell 
David S. Bechtel 
John C. Dittmer 
Donald Huschle 
William B. Johnson 
Stephen C. Rinkenberger 
James Stevens 
Jack N. Stork 
Paul R. Wesbecher 
David Whitson 
George J. Young 



High School 
Eldorado 
Eureka 
Bowen 

Cathedral -Belleville 
Kaneland 
Paxton 

Central Camp Point 
Sparta 
Sparta 

Nauvoo -Colusa 
Auburn 



Stephen Rinkenberger and William Johnson were also honored for being in the top 10 percent 
of their class. 

GRF 

Undergraduate Employees in Agricultural Education. The Division of Agricultural Education, 
University of Illinois, expanded its research program this year to the extent that more help 



AIDS, May 1966 



-2- 



was necessary. Hence, nine undergraduates were added to the payroll. The young men work 
during spare hours and contribute five to ten hours of work per week. Information regarding 
the new employees follows: 

Jack Stork was born and reared near Walsh, Illinois, and was graduated from Sparta Township 
High School in 1963. He is now a junior in agricultural education. Jack is a member of ATA 
and Agricultural Education Club. He is at present secretary of both organizations and presi- 
dent-elect of the Agricultural Education Club. 

David Whitson was born and reared on a farm near Nauvoo, Illinois. He graduated from 
Nauvoo -Colusa high school in 1963. Following high school graduation he completed two years 
of undergraduate work at Western Illinois University before transferring to the University of 
Illinois where he is now a junior majoring in agricultural education. He is a member of the 
Agricultural Education Club, Alpha Tau Alpha, Cooperative Extension Service Club, and is 
serving on the Agricultural Council. 

Bill Johnson was born and reared near Sugar Grove, Illinois. He graduated from Kaneland 
High School in 1963. He is currently a junior in agricultural education at the University of 
Illinois. He is a member of the Agricultural Education Club and Alpha Tau Alpha. Bill was 
recently honored for being in the top ten percent of the junior class in the College of Agricul- 
ture. 

George Young was born and reared near Auburn, Illinois. He graduated from Auburn High 
School in 1963. He is currently a junior in agricultural education at the University of Illinois. 
He is a member of the Agricultural Education Club and Alpha Tau Alpha. 

John Hillison is from Lee County and has lived in the rural Amboy area all his life. He is a 
1962 graduate of Amboy High School. John did his student teaching with Jesse Keyser at 
Lawrenceville Township High School this past fall semester. John is a member of the ATA, 
Agricultural Education Club, Alpha Zeta, and Illi-Del Co-op House. John plans to work to- 
ward his Master's of Education Degree next year at the University of Illinois, He will have a 
graduate assistant ship in agricultural education. 

Ronald Wesbecher was born and reared near Walsh, Illinois. He graduated from Sparta High 
School in 1963. He is presently a junior majoring in agricultural education. He is the current 
President of Alpha Tau Alpha, and a member of the Agricultural Education Club and Alpha Zeta. 

Roger Allaman was born and reared near Roseville, Illinois. He graduated from Roseville 
High School in 1962, and will receive a Bachelor of Science Degree in agriculture in June 1966. 
He is currently a senior -graduate student. Roger is active in the Agricultural Education Club, 
Alpha Zeta, Alpha Tau Alpha, Agricultural Council, and Ma-Wan -Da. Roger is engaged to 
Miss Jule Miller, a senior in home economics. A July 17 wedding is planned. 

John E„ Croft was born and reared near Oregon, Illinois. He graduated from Leaf River High 
School in 1964 and is now a sophomore at the University of Illinois where he is a member of the 
Agricultural Education Club and Alpha Tau Alpha. As an undergraduate he represents agricul- 
tural education on a newly formed Student Advisory Board for the Urbana-Champaign Council 
on Teacher Education, on which he is serving as vice-president and official liaison officer be- 
tween the students and the council. 

Peter Cahill was born and reared in Peoria County near Brimfield, Illinois. He was graduated 
from Brimfield High School in 1962 and completed two years of study at Western Illinois Uni- 
versity. He is currently a junior at the University of Illinois. He will receive a Bachelor of 
Science Degree in agricultural education and farm management in January 1967. He is a mem- 
ber of Alpha Gamma Rho Fraternity, Alpha Tau Alpha, Agricultural Education Club, Hoof and 
Horn Club, and a representative on the Agricidtural Council. 

DEU 

AIDS, May 1966 -3- 



ILLINOIS STATE UNIVERSITY 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRIC 

NORMAL, ILLINOIS 61761 




AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION NEWS 



Placement Report : As of April 20, six beginning teachers had accepted positions to teach 
vocational agriculture, two non-teaching positions, one enlisted in service, one planning to 
do graduate work leaving a total of 10 teachers available. 

Cooperating Teachers Conference : The Supervising Teachers Conference in Agricultural 
Education for the schools participating in the student teaching program at Illinois State 
University for the second semester will meet on campus May 10, 1966. The supervising 
teachers participating the second semester are: R. Glenn Willard, Dwight; Arthur Phillips, 
Eureka; Gene Elliott, Farmer City; Howard E. Cotter, Flanagan; Harold Lindley, Hopedale; 
Donald Bateman, LeRoy; Melvin Nicol, Maroa; Donald Kaufman, Morris; Robert Van Rheeden, 
New Lenox; Clarence Kuster, Normal; Daren Cox, Pontiac; Donald Higgs, Streator; Charles 
Schettler, Wapella; Frank Young, Washington. 

KEJ 



Alpha Tau Alpha News : 

Alpha Tau Alpha Officers. The following are the students who have been serving as officers 
for Xi Chapter, Illinois State University, their home school, and vocational agriculture 
teachers: 



Office 
President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Membership 
Publicity 
Advisors: Dr. A. A. Culver and Mr. R. K. Litherland 



Student 
Richard Hein 
Steve Bartmess 
Gary Brucker 
Danny Kuipers 
Larry Durham 
Fred Perry 



Home High School 
Kirkland 
Hutsonville 
Colfax 
Gilman 
Walnut 
Monticello 



Vo- 



Ag Teacher 



John Olson 
Earnest Edwards 
T. R. Miller 
William Lubben 
Dale Baxter 
N. J. Smith 



Alpha Tau Alpha Invitational Livestock Judging Contest: The Sixth Annual Invitational Live- 
stock Judging Contest was held on April 30 with 34 teams competing. Members of the ATA 
functioning as committees plan and carry out the entire contest. Following the contest an 
awards banquet was held to honor the high scoring individuals and teams. 

Holbert Medal Banquet : The Thirty -third Annual Holbert Medal Banquet was held Sunday, 
April 24, to honor the outstanding senior in agriculture. This year's award was a tie and 
the committee made a double award. The winners were Don Bitting of Kewanee and Gary 
Brucker of Colfax. Dr. Benton K. Bristol of the Department of Agriculture gave a slide 
presentation on "India — From the Desert to the Tropics." 

KEJ 



AIDS, May 1966 



Mr. Robert Battin, Public Relations Director, A. O. Smith Harve store, Inc., 
Arlington Heights, Illinois, has advised the NVATA office that application forms for the 
Harvestore Travel Awards will be mailed to all teachers of vocational agriculture by 
April 15, 1966. 

Applications must be completed and returned to State Association presidents no 
later than May 15, 1966. 

State Associations are urged to announce the state winner at the time of their annual 
conference. 

Six regional winners will be selected from the list of state winners with the regional 
winners receiving a trip to the NVATA Convention in Denver plus a tour of the U. S. in the 
summer of 1967. 

Section 7 News 

Representatives of the LaSalle County Farm Bureau and five Section 7 vo. ag. 
teachers held a dinner meeting March 29 at the Steak House in Ottawa to organize the FFA- 
Farm Bureau acquaintance program. 

April 20 was set as the date for FFA chapters in LaSalle County to send representa- 
tives to Ottawa for a dinner meeting and to become better acquainted with the County Farm 

Bureau and affiliated companies „ -. 

George Irvine 

****** Section 7 

Public Relations Officer 
Section 11 News 

There hasn't been much unusual activity in this section this year. None of the 
teachers got married, none had any new arrivals. Nobody caught any big fish and no one 
went deer hunting. 

Seven teachers attended E474 at Mt. Sterling to qualify as supervisors of work experi 
ence programs. 

On February 24, ten ag. teachers and forty FFA members, along with other teachers 
and FFA members from Illinois, Missouri, and Iowa, met with Illinois State FFA officers 
and the National FFA officers. The meeting was sponsored by Moorman Manufacturing Co. 
and was held in the Holiday Inn in Quincy. 

Ways to get rich: One of the section 11 agriculture teachers is drilling for oil on his 
farm. One of the unmarried agriculture teachers is courting a future heiress to considerable 
wealth. 

Our congratulations to Bushnell -Prairie City FFA Chapter. They have a first-place 
extemporaneous speaker and a second-place prepared speech entrant — both to compete in the 
District III competition. 

There are two agri-business students at Colchester, both apparently working out 
quite well. I appeared on a radio program 'The King and I" on behalf of Section 11 vocational 
agriculture teachers on December 4, over Radio Station WKAI, Macomb, 

Earl A. Traver 

Section 11 

Public Relations Officer 

AIDS, May 1966 -2- 



Section 23 News 

Vo-Ag teachers here welcome Frank Barbre to the section. Frank is the new teacher 
at Lawrenceville. Congratulations are in order for Jesse Keyser as he assumes new responsi- 
bilities as assistant superintendent and vocational director at Lawrenceville. We are hoping 
that the new job will not completely remove Jesse from sectional agricultural education activi- 
ties. 

Everyone connected with agriculture education and FFA activities was saddened by the 
news of the passing of John Hunley's father. John is Section 23 FFA V. P. and District V 
Director. Our sympathy goes out to John, his mother, and other children ., 

Efforts are being made to get an Extension course in agriculture for the fall of 1966 
here in S.E. Illinois. A survey sheet has been sent out to several agricultural leaders in the 
area. The early returns indicate a preference for Ag. 303 Soil Fertility and is a toss up to be 
located at Olney or Flora. Anyone that may not have received a questionnaire may contact me 
or your own public relations officer and have him write „ Dr. Matthews has indicated that most 
of the courses offered this spring should be available this fall. 

B. L. Whittington 

Section 23 

Public Relations Officer 

A special committee on Professional Personnel Recruitment has been appointed by the 
Executive Committee of the Agricultural Division of the AVA, This was done in anticipation 
of shortages of teachers in vocational agriculture. 

State supervisors last fall reported a shortage of 120 vocational agriculture teachers 
in the Nation when school opened. Of 1,038 agricultural education majors qualified in 1965, 
only 671,or 64.6%, entered teaching. Figures from the U„ S. Office of Education show that 
the number of agricultural education majors in the Nation has declined every year since 
1961. when there were 759, to 691 in 1964-65. 

Looking ahead for the next three years, supervisors estimate the number of newposi- 
tions will rise to 1,318 per year. These openings, they predicted, would occur in the 
following types of teaching: teaching production agriculture, 39%; teaching for off -farm 
agricultural occupations, 23%; teaching agricultural technicians, 8%; teaching adults and 
young farmers only, 8%; teaching disadvantaged youth, 5%; all other specialized teachers, 
18%, This suggests that not only will more teachers be needed, but they will be teaching 
in new programs. 

The committee believes that only through a concerted National effort involving each 
state, can an adequate supply of well -trained teachers be provided. They suggest the fol- 
lowing activities: 

1. Presenting information on the supply and demand for teachers of voca- 
tional agriculture to all those concerned in your state. 

2. The establishment in each state of a commission on Professional Personal 
Recruitment for Agricultural Education. 

3. Providing teachers with suitable brochures, folders, posters, etc. , to aid 
them in contacting students and parents. 

4. Recognition of "Teachers of Teachers" through a special award to be made 
at state teachers conferences. 

AfDS, May 1966 -3- 



5. The coordination of our recruitment efforts for agricultural education with 
those of the Land-Grant Colleges and universities and other interested 
agencies. 

I would like comments from any member of our Association as to what steps we might 
take immediately concerning teacher recruitment. I would also like to hear from those 
teachers who have had a large number of former students who became teachers of vocational 
agriculture. Let me know how many of your former students entered teaching. Please' 

Following are some facts and figures on agriculture I obtained from Chief Ralph 
Guthrie. I thought they might be of interest and value to Association members: 

What is Agriculture - 

To the city worker, agriculture is expected to continue supplying a neverending stream of 
food, fiber, wood, and other products. 

To 6.5 million American workers, on 3.5 million farms, agriculture is a way of life , a 
job, a business, a chore or pleasure. 

To 6 million workers, agriculture is a customer. These workers supply the farmer with 
tools and materials for farm producticn; they supply his family's daily needs. Farmers 
bought $41 billion worth of goods and services in 1963; $29 billion for production supplies 
and $12 billion for family living. 

To 10 million workers,, agriculture is a supplier of raw materials, the workers whc trans- 
port, process, manufacture and sell farm goods. In 1961, manufacturers of food products 
alone had 1.7 million employees and a payroll of $8.4 billion. Farmers sold nearly $37 
billion worth of farm products in 1963 and earned $7 billion off the farm. 

To 192 million Americans, agriculture is three square meals a day, most of the clothing 
we wear, the wood in our homes. 

To the 3 billion people on earth, American agriculture is a magnificent example of abundant 
production, one proof of our successful democratic system. But, while world farm pro- 
duction continues to rise, population is increasing even faster and per capita food output is 
still inadequate in many countries. 

TO ALL OF US, AGRICULTURE IS ALL OF US. 



AIDS, May 1966 -4- 



(tear sheet) 



TO: Vocational Agriculture Service 
434 Mumford Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 

Please send the following items: 
Number Price* Amount 



S£(6£) _ 

12?(9£)_ 
8£(6£)_ 
20<?(16£) 
20^(16^)" 
20<?(16£)~ 
8?(6£) i 



8«6fl. 



VAS 
VAS 
VAS 
VAS 
VAS 
VAS 
VAS 
VAS 
VAS 

VAS 



Item 
NEW AND REVISED SUBJECT-MATTER UNITS 

1038, Feed Additives, 8 p. 

1039, Systems of Swine Breeding, 8p. 
2004a, Field Arrangement Principles, 8p. 
2012a, Fitting Livestock to the Farm, 12p. 
2014a, Choosing the Livestock System, 8p. 

2039, Fitting Machinery and Equipment to the Farm, 20p. 

3018, Air Compressors, 20p. 

3019, Small Engines - Repair and Overhaul, 2 Op. 

4048, Pruning and Training Bramble Fruits and 
Highbush Blueberries, 8p. 

4049, Maize Dwarf Mosaic of Corn, 8p. 



Price in parentheses applies if total order is for more than 1,000 pages. Otherwise 
price is l£ per page. 



4£ 
4? 
4? 
4? 
4£ 

50£ 



Approved Practices for Alfalfa 
Approved Practices for Corn 
Approved Practices for Oats 
Approved Practices for Soybeans 
Approved Practices for Wheat 

Set of Weed Control Visuals 



1966 revisions 



*Prices do not include postage 






Name 



School 



Address_ 
Billing 



AIDS, May 1966 



(tear sheet) 
Number Price* Amount COMPOSITE ORDER 

60c: Replacement lens for plastic safety face masks 



*Price does not include postage. 

Name School_ 

Address 

Billing 



I wish to apply for a set of FFA roadside signs (for school year 1966-67) 
This would be a 



new set replacement set 

Name School 



Address 



ENTRY BLANK - IAVAT E X CH A NGE - -O F - -ID E AS CONTEST 

I propose to display the following item(s) in the IAVAT Exchange -of -Ideas Contest at the 
June Conference: 



Class 1 - Field and Shop Aids 



Class 2 - Classroom Aids 



Signed School_ 



Return this entry blank to Vocational Agriculture Service, 434 Mumford Hall, Urbana, before 
May 15, 1966. Include plans or copy if you wish to have them duplicated for distribution. 
Bring entry to Vocational Agriculture Service Shop and Storage Building when you come to 
the Conference. 

WIVES AT JUNE CONFERENCE 

I plan to bring my wife to the June Conference to participate in the special programs being 
planned by the local committee. 

She will arrive She will stay until 

Signed School 



Return to Vocational Agriculture Service, 434 Mumford Hall, Urbana, before June 1, 1966. 
AIDS, May 1966 



INDEX TO ITEMS IN VO-AG SERVICE SECTION 

Page 

Agricultural Release and Advance Order Form . 4 

Approved Practices - Alfalfa and Corn Revised 3 

Billing for Agricultural Releases and Advance Orders 1 

Designs for Nailed Trusses 5 

FFA Roadside Signs 4 

Final Shipment of Agricultural Releases . 1 

Final Shipment of New Units 1 

Future Demands for Teachers of Vocational Agriculture 4 

Housing for June Conference 2 

Judging Rules 2 

Meat and Milk Judging Contest 2 : 3 

New Books . 5 

New Bulletins and Circulars . 1 

Presentations from Swine Day and Cattle Feeders Day . 5 

Replacement Lens for Plastic Face Masks . 1 

Return of Surveying Kits. 1 

Spotlight 4 

Veterinary Medicine Open House 4 

Weed Control Visuals 3 



AIDS, May 1966 



PRICE LIST OF FEEDS- 



The feed prices for many of the feedstuff s used in vocational agriculture projects are listed 
below. This list is meant to be used as a basis of values for all boys obtaining their feed at 
home. Feed purchased should be recorded at prices paid. 

Kind of feed Apr. 14 

Corn, shelled, bu. .......... $1.19 

Corn, ground shelled or ear corn, bu 1.29 

Oats, bu. .66 

Oats, ground, bu. 76 

Barley, (feed) bu. .90 

Barley, ground or rolled, bu. . 1.00 

Grain sorghum, cwt. . 1.90 

Grain sorghum, cracked, cwt. 2.00 

Skim and buttermilk, cwt. 1.50 

Whole milk, Grade B, cwt. 3.00 

Corn silage, ton .............................. 9.50 

Sorghum silage, ton 8.50- / 

Haylage, ton 14.00— 

Closer and m *ed hay, An „ loes 22.50 

m- , u v are for baled. Figure 01 _ n 

Timothy ) , i^r-i * ..............21.00 

~ , J , ' loose at $5 less per ton 10 „» 

Oat or wheat straw ) w ^ 18.00 



— Prepared in cooperation with the Department of Agricultural Economics 



26 



r convert to dry hay equivalent containing 90 percent dry matter. 



ADDS, May 1966 



VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE SERVICE 

University of Illinois - Collogo of Agriculture 

434 MUMFORD HALL ■ URBANA, ILLINOIS 



SERIALS DEPARTMENT SSHL 

UNIV OF ILL LIBRARY 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 
Q 630 7305 ILL C002 » 23 24(1964 19 

Vocational-agriculture aids. 



3 0112 089588864